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Posts from ‘July, 2005’

The Independent on Sunday: The week that was: Investors get the jitters as lenders are hit by bad debts

The Independent on Sunday: The week that was: Investors get the jitters as lenders are hit by bad debts

“Meanwhile, Royal Dutch Shell unveiled half-year profits of £5.8bn, or £1.3m an hour. But it doesn’t plan to stop there. Shell plans to increase the money spent on exploring for oilfields to £1bn both this year and next year. Investors had been concerned that Shell wasn’t doing enough to replace its falling oil reserves.”

Sunday 31 July 2005

Fears that consumers have been over-extending themselves resurfaced again last week with Lloyds TSB reporting a jump in bad debt charges. While first-half profits increased 9 per cent, the market got a little jumpy when Lloyds said impairment losses on bad loans were up 52 per cent to £670m.

Statistics released by the Bank of England also suggested that consumers were getting nervous. UK lending to households rose in June by the second-smallest amount this year, the bank found.

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The Observer: The marketing of Blairism

The Observer: The marketing of Blairism

“You could be forgiven for thinking that think-tanks exert more influence on the Prime Minister than business and unions combined.”: “There is lingering suspicion that think-tanks are skewed by the financial backing of big business. The SMF has a business group that companies like pharmaceuticals giant GlaxoSmithKline and oil major Shell pay over £10,000 to join.”

Sunday July 31, 2005

Nick Mathiason meets Ann Rossiter, head of the Social Market Foundation think-tank, and leading light in the Third Way

Last May, Philip Collins, director of the Social Market Foundation (SMF), was parachuted into Number 10 as Tony Blair’s top speechwriter and strategic adviser. There to greet him was his old friend Matthew Taylor, former head of the Institute of Public Policy Research, now Blair’s chief policy guru.

You could be forgiven for thinking that think-tanks exert more influence on the Prime Minister than business and unions combined.

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The Observer: And they call this the silly season?

The Observer: And they call this the silly season?

“Corporate giants like Vodafone, Rolls-Royce, BP, Shell, and AstraZeneca all came out with results that were – with the exception of beleaguered Shell – rather better than the market had a right to expect.”

Sunday July 31, 2005

Frank Kane

Whoever called it the silly season? It’s the end of July, just when businessmen, investment bankers and fund managers are supposed to be heading to the beach, but just look at the wall of corporate and investment news that hit us last week, when newspapers – business sections included – are supposed to be screaming for an event, any event, to fill up the space.

Corporate giants like Vodafone, Rolls-Royce, BP, Shell, and AstraZeneca all came out with results that were – with the exception of beleaguered Shell – rather better than the market had a right to expect. All paid top-notch dividends, to shareholders’ delight.

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End of an Auto Sale

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL: End of an Auto Sale

Exxon Mobil and Shell said earnings climbed more than 30% amid soaring oil prices, but both saw production decline

Sunday July 31, 2005

THIS WEEK

GM Discount Ends: General Motors plans to end its successful “employee discounts for everyone” promotion this week. The company also signaled that it will embark on a new pricing strategy for 2006 models that will attempt to focus on permanently lower sticker prices instead of big rebates.

Auto Sales: Tomorrow we find out what impact the Big Three’s discount programs have had, as the July motor-vehicle sales figures come out. Results could influence whether Ford and Chrysler extend their discount programs into August.

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Yuppies mark Rossport card

The Sunday Times: Yuppies mark Rossport card

“A city-centre rally in support of the Rossport Five, the jailed Shell pipeline protesters, was heckled by a counter-demonstration staged by four young crusaders styling themselves as “pro-capitalists”. “…the impertinent interlopers really seemed to annoy the various Green, Labour, Sinn Fein and independent TDs who have leapt aboard the Rossport bandwagon.”

Sunday 31 July 2005

Wit is the last weapon one expects to see used in the guerrilla war between the far-left, environmentalist and anarchist factions that sputters away on the fringes of Dublin’s growing protest community. Last weekend, however, we caught a glimpse of a small but intrepid group that seemed determined to put the card into placard.

A city-centre rally in support of the Rossport Five, the jailed Shell pipeline protesters, was heckled by a counter-demonstration staged by four young crusaders styling themselves as “pro-capitalists”.

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The Sunday Times: And Finally … If Shell is driven away who else will invest in Mayo?

The Sunday Times: And Finally … If Shell is driven away who else will invest in Mayo?

“THE people of Mayo know all about boycotts, having coined the word in 1880…”: “In all the fuss surrounding the jailing of the so-called Rossport Five it is easy to lose sight of the fact that Shell is acting entirely within the law.”: “With the world’s media picking up the efforts being made to prevent Shell proceeding with its legally approved project we can’t see the region’s fortunes improving any time soon.”

Sunday 31 July 2005

Frank Fitzgibbon

THE people of Mayo know all about boycotts, having coined the word in 1880 following a famous confrontation with Captain Charles Cunningham Boycott, a hated land agent for Lord Erne. Boycott, acting on behalf of the absentee landlord, refused to accept reduced rent from tenants as proposed by the Land League. The locals responded by shunning Boycott, refusing to work for him or serve him in the shops.

Today, more than a century later, a small number of locals and opportunistic politicians accompanied by the usual rag-tag of protesters, have decided that Shell, the oil multinational, is the modern-day equivalent of Lord Erne. Some are even trying to punish Shell by encouraging the public to give the company’s Irish interests Boycott-syle treatment. The company might have an earl on its board but with quarterly profits of more than €3.8 billion we don’t imagine the top dogs at Shell’s Dutch headquarters are quaking at the prospect.

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Mayo council ‘to get Shell windfall’

The Sunday Times (UK): Mayo council ‘to get Shell windfall’

“Supporters of the Rossport Five — the local landowners who have spent the past month in jail — want Shell to move its operations offshore, but it has emerged that the council, which granted planning permission for an inland terminal, has a strong vested interest in keeping Shell on land.”: “The council will be paid €2m in rates… for downfall pipes, some of which will run through land owned by the Rossport Five.”: “…Mayo county secretary, confirmed last week that conditions laid down… in Shell’s planning permission will result in total payments to the council of about €6.5m from the firm.”

Sunday 31 July 2005

Aine Ryan

MAYO county council is in line for a substantial financial windfall if Shell processes its Corrib gas find on land.

Supporters of the Rossport Five — the local landowners who have spent the past month in jail — want Shell to move its operations offshore, but it has emerged that the council, which granted planning permission for an inland terminal, has a strong vested interest in keeping Shell on land.

The council will be paid €2m in rates for the terminal building at Bellanaboy, and for downfall pipes, some of which will run through land owned by the Rossport Five.

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Gulf Times: Shell loses appeal to restore LNG jetty approval

Gulf Times: Shell loses appeal to restore LNG jetty approval

“The Royal Dutch Shell Plc-led venture on Russia’s Sakhalin Island may face delays on plans to sell liquefied natural gas to Asia after losing an appeal to reinstate an environmental approval”: “Talks with the European Bank of Reconstruction and Development about funding for the project stalled after the bank found environmental problems”

Sunday, 31 July, 2005

By Torrey Clark

MOSCOW: The Royal Dutch Shell Plc-led venture on Russia’s Sakhalin Island may face delays on plans to sell liquefied natural gas to Asia after losing an appeal to reinstate an environmental approval, ecologists said.

The Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk court earlier this week upheld a previous decision that annulled a favourable environmental impact review for a temporary jetty built by Sakhalin Energy Investment Co, the project operator, California-based Pacific Environment has said in an e-mailed statement.

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ROYAL DUTCH SHELL NEWS HEADLINES JULY 2005

ROYAL DUTCH SHELL NEWS HEADLINES JULY 2005

Gulf Times: Shell loses appeal to restore LNG jetty approval: “The Royal Dutch Shell Plc-led venture on Russia’s Sakhalin Island may face delays on plans to sell liquefied natural gas to Asia after losing an appeal to reinstate an environmental approval”: “Talks with the European Bank of Reconstruction and Development about funding for the project stalled after the bank found environmental problems”: Sunday, 31 July, 2005: Read the article

The Sunday Times (UK): Mayo council ‘to get Shell windfall’: “Supporters of the Rossport Five — the local landowners who have spent the past month in jail — want Shell to move its operations offshore, but it has emerged that the council, which granted planning permission for an inland terminal, has a strong vested interest in keeping Shell on land.”: “The council will be paid €2m in rates… for downfall pipes, some of which will run through land owned by the Rossport Five.”: “…Mayo county secretary, confirmed last week that conditions laid down… in Shell’s planning permission will result in total payments to the council of about €6.5m from the firm.”: Sunday 31 July 2005: Read the article

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Further delays and soaring expenditure in big energy projects emerge at Royal Dutch Shell

The Times (UK): That was the week: “Further delays and soaring expenditure in big energy projects emerge at Royal Dutch Shell after the oil group admits that the start-up of Bonga, a giant offshore Nigerian oilfield, has been pushed back until late this year.”

Saturday 30 July 2005

Further delays and soaring expenditure in big energy projects emerge at Royal Dutch Shell after the oil group admits that the start-up of Bonga, a giant offshore Nigerian oilfield, has been pushed back until late this year.

AstraZeneca announces that David Brennan, head of the Anglo-Swedish drug group’s US operations, will replace Sir Tom McKillop as chief executive from next January, ending months of speculation. In another management overhaul, Jürgen Schrempp, architect of the controversial merger between Daimler-Benz and Chrysler, agrees to step down as chief executive of DaimlerChrysler at the end of the year. Sony, the Japanese electronics company, stuns investors with a dramatic cut to its earnings forecast and its first back-to-back quarterly loss in four years.

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Daily Telegraph: Not bad results this half but UK plc could do better

Daily Telegraph: Not bad results this half but UK plc could do better

“… Jeroen van der Veer, chief executive of Shell, whose sums have given so much trouble recently, admitted: “It is clear we must improve our project management.”

Saturday 30 July 2005

(Filed: 30/07/2005)

Although company figures are encouraging, economists know the truth, says Philip Aldrick

School’s out for the City. The summer holidays have arrived and corporate Britain has been packing up its pencil case to head off on a well-earned break. A total of 21 blue chip companies published their half-term reports this week, 14 of them on Thursday, and the figures show that only one or two have been slacking.

“Things do look quite rosy at the moment,” says Richard Buxton, head of UK equities at Schroders. “Aside from the companies directly facing the consumer on the high street and feeding off the housing market, the corporate sector is in good health.

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Daily Telegraph: A summary of this week’s main business stories

Daily Telegraph: A summary of this week’s main business stories

“Shell declared a 27pc increase in first-half profits to $10.17billion (£5.8billion) but admitted that its oil and gas production had fallen by 129,000 barrels a day over the period.”

Saturday 30 July 2005

• Sir Tom McKillop, chief executive of Astrazeneca, said he would step down in January and be replaced by US head David Brennan, as second-quarter pre-tax profits at the pharmaceutical giant rose 7pc to $1.75billion (£1billion) on sales up 16pc to $6.13billion.

• Glaxo Smithkline, Britain’s biggest drug company, reported a 7.8pc rise in first-half pre-tax profits to £1.66billion on sales up from £4.97billion to £5.35billion, despite problems at its Puerto Rico plant which led to the disruption in supply of two key drugs.

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RTE (Ireland): Shell announces 56 more Corrib lay-offs

RTE (Ireland): Shell announces 56 more Corrib lay-offs

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Irish Examiner: Shell axes 56 jobs as a result of pipe protests

Irish Examiner: Shell axes 56 jobs as a result of pipe protests

“Mark Carrigy, operations manager for Shell EP Ireland, claimed protesters had been obstructing non-pipeline work and as a result the sub-contractors were forced to cut employee numbers.”: “The job losses come as five men jailed over their protests against the pipeline brothers Philip and Vincent McGrath, Micheal O’Seighin, Willie Corduff and Brendan Philbin were completing their fifth week behind bars.”

Saturday 30 July 2005

By Ed Carty

A TOTAL of 56 jobs are to be axed at the site of a controversial gas pipeline on the Mayo coast, it was confirmed yesterday.

Petroleum giant Shell revealed the cuts were being made on top of 35 lay-offs announced earlier this week.

The staff were involved in engineering and land works on the 70km pipeline running from the Corrib gas field to a proposed terminal at Bellanaboy.

Mark Carrigy, operations manager for Shell EP Ireland, claimed protesters had been obstructing non-pipeline work and as a result the sub-contractors were forced to cut employee numbers.

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Irish Examiner: Shell axes 56 jobs as a result of pipe protests

Irish Examiner: Shell axes 56 jobs as a result of pipe protests

“Mark Carrigy, operations manager for Shell EP Ireland, claimed protesters had been obstructing non-pipeline work and as a result the sub-contractors were forced to cut employee numbers.”: “The job losses come as five men jailed over their protests against the pipeline brothers Philip and Vincent McGrath, Micheal O’Seighin, Willie Corduff and Brendan Philbin were completing their fifth week behind bars.”

Saturday 30 July 2005

By Ed Carty

A TOTAL of 56 jobs are to be axed at the site of a controversial gas pipeline on the Mayo coast, it was confirmed yesterday.

Petroleum giant Shell revealed the cuts were being made on top of 35 lay-offs announced earlier this week.

The staff were involved in engineering and land works on the 70km pipeline running from the Corrib gas field to a proposed terminal at Bellanaboy.

Mark Carrigy, operations manager for Shell EP Ireland, claimed protesters had been obstructing non-pipeline work and as a result the sub-contractors were forced to cut employee numbers.

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Irish Independent: Pipe protests are costing fuel giant 100,000 a day

Irish Independent: Pipe protests are costing fuel giant 100,000 a day

“Last week, Minister Noel Dempsey said he believed that the company had breached the permissions it was granted and had asked Shell for an immediate response, which is currently being considered by the minister.”

Saturday July 30, 2005

PROTESTS over the laying of a controversial pipeline in Co Mayo are costing oil giant Shell 100,000 a day, the company claimed yesterday.

Announcing 56 redundancies, bringing the total number of people laid off by the company to 91 this week – after Tuesday’s laying off of 35 workers – the company said its workers had not been able to access sites due to ongoing protests. And it warned that further jobs could be lost unless work can go ahead.

In a statement yesterday Shell said that following consultations with sub-contractor SICIM-Roadbridge, it had decided that 56 workers involved in engineering and land works at four sites within the project were to be made redundant.

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Daily Telegraph: Fish protest forces Shell to delay oil terminal

Daily Telegraph: Fish protest forces Shell to delay oil terminal

“Shell ran into another obstacle on its Sakhalin project yesterday after a Russian court ruled against the construction of a quay on the island.”: “The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development is mulling over whether to continue lending money to the project, in the face of furious environmentalists who have taken full-page newspaper advertisements to protest against Shell.”

Saturday 30 July 2005

By Malcolm Moore (Filed: 30/07/2005)

Shell ran into another obstacle on its Sakhalin project yesterday after a Russian court ruled against the construction of a quay on the island.

The Sakhalin project, which aims to tap 4billion barrels of oil and gas under the frozen seas off Russia’s east coast, has enraged environmentalists and is running 100pc over budget.

After agreeing to move a pipeline earlier in the year to safeguard a population of Pacific grey whales, Shell is now being accused of destroying local fish populations.

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Daily Telegraph: The Sakhalin Island indicator to oil prices

Daily Telegraph: The Sakhalin Island indicator to oil prices

Protest forces Shell delay: “Sakhalin is already 100pc over budget at $20billion and contractors are demanding more and more cash. Given that one of them was found stabbed in his apartment last week, they probably deserve it.”

Saturday 30 July 2005

Let us hope that the kamikaze whale that beached itself at Sakhalin Island yesterday was not a female. According to the World Wildlife Fund, if the remaining 23 female grey whales at Sakhalin die at the rate of “just one a year”, the whole species will be extinct shortly.

The environmentalists blame Shell, which is trying to get at four billion barrels of oil and gas in the region, but it seems the whales are perfectly capable of self-immolation. For its part, Shell seems to have behaved with all the corporate social responsibility that might have been lacking if, say, Gazprom or the Russian government had been running the show.

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Shell’s woes mount as it admits cost overruns and delays

THE TIMES (UK): Shell’s woes mount as it admits cost overruns and delays

“FURTHER delays and soaring expenditure in big energy projects emerged at Royal Dutch Shell yesterday when the company admitted that the start-up of Bonga, a giant offshore Nigerian oilfield, had been pushed back until late this year.“: “Bonga’s budget has already swelled from a $2.7 billion estimate in 2001 to about $4 billion (£2.3 billion).”: “In a reference to the Sakhalin cost overruns, admitted by Shell a fortnight ago, Mr van der Veer said: “It is clear we must improve project management.”

Friday 29 July 2005

By Carl Mortished, International Business Editor

FURTHER delays and soaring expenditure in big energy projects emerged at Royal Dutch Shell yesterday when the company admitted that the start-up of Bonga, a giant offshore Nigerian oilfield, had been pushed back until late this year.

The billion barrel oilfield was expected to start producing in the summer but Peter Voser, Shell’s finance director, said that production would not get going until the fourth quarter. Bonga’s budget has already swelled from a $2.7 billion estimate in 2001 to about $4 billion (£2.3 billion).

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The Guardian: Shell meets its match in the Rossport Five

The Guardian: Shell meets its match in the Rossport Five

“Suddenly, the issue became one of the biggest news stories of the year and, as the Irish Examiner called it, “a major public relations disaster for the Shell corporation”: “The “Rossport Five” were jailed at the specific request of the company, which had obtained compulsory purchase orders for the land in question – the first time in Irish history that such an order was granted to a private company. The five will remain in jail until they undertake not to obstruct the company.”: “Shell officials misjudged the situation…”: “July has seen huge rallies in support of the men in Co Mayo and in Dublin, the picketing of Shell garages nationwide, and round-the-clock blockades of the refinery construction site.”

William Hederman

Friday July 29, 2005

The residents of the tiny village of Rossport, in the north-west corner of County Mayo on Ireland’s Atlantic coast, have been up in arms for almost five years now. They have spent that time campaigning against a proposal by the petroleum giant Shell to lay a pipeline through their community to carry untreated gas from beneath the sea to a refinery 5.5 miles inland. Their cause secured little or no coverage in the national press until, at the end of June, five of them were jailed for refusing Shell access to their land to begin work on the pipeline.

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Shell’s first results as a single group disappoint

Financial Times: Shell’s first results as a single group disappoint

“Shell, which this month united its Dutch and UK holding companies, is struggling to keep up. It lags behind competitors in production growth, faces lawsuits in the US over false reserves statements and announced a $10bn cost overrun at Sakhalin-2, the flagship Russian project. There was further bad news yesterday from Jeroen van der Veer, Shell chief executive, who said that Bonga, one of Shell’s most important projects in Nigeria, would also be delayed.”

Friday 29 July 2005

By Carola Hoyos in London

Published: July 29 2005

* Oil company’s performance fails to match BP’s

Royal Dutch Shell, the world’s third biggest listed energy group, disappointed investors yesterday as its first earnings report as a unified company revealed weaker-than-expected results.

Second-quarter “current cost of supply” net profit, a closely watched measure which excludes gains from rising fuel stock values and one-off charges, was $5.17bn (€4.29bn), compared with expectations of $5.44bn.

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THE NEW YORK TIMES: High Energy Prices Boost 3 Oil Companies

THE NEW YORK TIMES: High Energy Prices Boost 3 Oil Companies

“Repeated restatements of its oil reserves last year cost Shell, one of the world’s largest oil producers with BP PLC and Exxon Mobil, almost $150 million in fines imposed by U.S. and British regulators and led to the dismissal of three senior executives.”

Friday 29 July 2005

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DALLAS (AP) — Two of the world’s largest oil companies, Exxon Mobil Corp. and Royal Dutch Shell PLC, said Thursday that second-quarter profits rose by about one-third, buoyed by high energy prices and higher worldwide consumption. The companies improved their earnings despite rising costs and lower output of oil and natural gas.

Marathon Oil Corp., a smaller player in the energy business, also benefited from soaring energy prices in the second quarter, achieving 91 percent earnings growth.

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Exxon, Shell Profits Climb Sharply

The Wall Street Journal: Exxon, Shell Profits Climb Sharply

“The company, which earlier this month disclosed budget overruns and a half-year delay at its massive Sakhalin II gas project in Russia, said yesterday that production at its giant offshore oil field in Nigeria, Bonga, would be delayed once again, though just by a few months.”

Friday 29 July 2005
High Oil Prices Lift Results,
But Declines in Production
Reflect Industry’s Challenge

By JEFFREY BALL and BENOÎT FAUCON
Staff Reporters of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
July 29, 2005; Page A3

In the latest sign of the oil industry’s current success and future challenge, Exxon Mobil Corp. and Royal Dutch Shell PLC said their second-quarter net income shot up more than 30% amid soaring oil prices, but both saw production fall as aging fields continued to decline.

Cash-rich Exxon also announced a further increase in its rate of share buybacks, its preferred method of rewarding shareholders, even as some investors renewed calls for a dividend boost. The company — the largest U.S. company by market value, ahead of General Electric Co. — said it will spend $5 billion in the third quarter on share buybacks, up from $3.5 billion in the second quarter and $2.5 billion in the first quarter.

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Daily Mirror: GROTESQUE: Union blasts Shell’s £372 a second profit

Daily Mirror (UK): GROTESQUE: Union blasts Shell’s £372 a second profit

“SHELL sparked outrage yesterday by revealing profits of £372 a second.”: “Union Amicus called the profit “grotesque” and accused Shell of putting cash before staff safety. The company was fined £900,000 in April for health and safety lapses over the deaths of two Scottish workers in 2003. Keith Moncrieff, 45, and Sean McCue, 22, were overcome by gas on the Brent Bravo platform.”

Friday 29 July 2005

SHELL sparked outrage yesterday by revealing profits of £372 a second.

The oil giant made £5.85 billion in the first half of the year – up 27 per cent on the same period in 2004.

The firm’s profit is just below the near £6billion – or £422 a second -reported this week by rival BP.

Union Amicus called the profit “grotesque” and accused Shell of putting cash before staff safety. The company was fined £900,000 in April for health and safety lapses over the deaths of two Scottish workers in 2003. Keith Moncrieff, 45, and Sean McCue, 22, were overcome by gas on the Brent Bravo platform.

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The Guardian (UK): Shell’s big profits fail to impress City

The Guardian (UK): Shell’s big profits fail to impress City

“The City was less than impressed with yesterday’s figures, which were below expectations. “Shell has a relatively weak competitive position, limited organic growth opportunities, poor reserve replacement record and its project management is poor,” according to Barclays analyst Andrew Fisher.”

Friday July 29, 2005

Mark Milner and David Teather in New York

Royal Dutch Shell yesterday added its name to the ranks of oil companies posting big profits increases only to find its performance under scrutiny.

The company, which has just completed the merger of the Royal Dutch and Shell holding companies, said second-quarter earning had risen 26% to $4.6bn (£2.6bn) on a current cost of supplies basis.

Chief executive Jeroen van der Veer said the company would continue to concentrate on “more upstream and profitable downstream” and that its strong earnings and cash flow would be used for dividends, investment and a share buyback programme that could be resumed after completion of the unification process.

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Daily Telegraph: Shell gushes to $10bn in face of Sakhalin costs

Daily Telegraph: Shell gushes to $10bn in face of Sakhalin costs

Friday 29 July 2005

By Malcolm Moore (Filed: 29/07/2005)

Shell yesterday declared a 27pc increase in first-half profits to $10.17billion (£5.8billion) but admitted that its oil and gas production had fallen by 129,000 barrels a day over the period.

Shares in the newly-restructured Royal Dutch Shell fell 31p to £17.59. Analysts said that Shell’s upstream oil and gas unit had underperformed – even though it saw profits rise by around 50pc on the back of higher energy prices.

Shell’s main problem in the second quarter was a huge cost overrun on its landmark Sakhalin project, which aims to tap four billion barrels of hydrocarbons in the frozen sea off the east coast of Russia.

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Lloyds List: Investment concern as Shell earnings soar

Lloyds List: Investment concern as Shell earnings soar

Capital expenditure figure for year of $15bn excludes cost overruns on Sakhalin II, writes Martyn Wingrove:

“STRONG oil prices have sent unified Royal Dutch Shell’s earnings into a 26% rise in the second quarter, but there are concerns over rises in capital investments on Russian projects.”

Friday July 29, 2005

STRONG oil prices have sent unified Royal Dutch Shell’s earnings into a 26% rise in the second quarter, but there are concerns over rises in capital investments on Russian projects.

The London-listed oil group reported earnings of $4.63bn in the second quarter compared with $3.66bn for the same period last year, but its capital expenditure climbed 20% to $4.13bn in the quarter, $2.4bn of this in upstream operations.

The Anglo-Dutch group has seen its oil and gas production fall since the first quarter to 3.5m barrels of oil equivalent a day from almost 3.85m in March, although it was flat compared with the second quarter last year.

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Lloyds List: Shell LPG sale process gains momentum

Lloyds List: LPG sale process gains momentum

“Shell is about to take a step forward in the oil major’s efforts to sell its liquefied petroleum gas business, writes Tony Gray. The group will soon open a ‘data room’ to allow serious potential bidders access to all the information needed to assess the business’ value.”

Friday July 29, 2005

Shell is about to take a step forward in the oil major’s efforts to sell its liquefied petroleum gas business, writes Tony Gray.

The group will soon open a ‘data room’ to allow serious potential bidders access to all the information needed to assess the business’ value.

Buying candidates will be selected from those which respond positively to a ‘teaser’ document, effectively an executive summary of the operations.

Shell aims to have an offer in place for the marketing and distribution assets of its branded LPG business by the end of this year and finalise the deal next year.

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EBRD Raps Sakhalin 2 Gas, Oil Project Over Environmental Concerns

RedNova News: EBRD Raps Sakhalin 2 Gas, Oil Project Over Environmental Concerns

“The so-called Sakhalin 2 natural gas and oil development project involving Japanese trading houses has suffered a fresh setback after the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development said the project lacks environmental awareness.”

Posted Friday 29 July 2005

Jul. 28–TOKYO — The so-called Sakhalin 2 natural gas and oil development project involving Japanese trading houses has suffered a fresh setback after the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development said the project lacks environmental awareness.

According to sources close to the matter, the EBRD has been considering funding the project but recently called on Sakhalin Energy Investment Co., the project’s operator, to improve on the lack of environment protection measures after conducting inspections at project sites off the island of Sakhalin in Russia’s Far East.

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Reuters: Iran: Door open to foreign investors

Reuters: Iran: Door open to foreign investors

“Legislators have accused oil giant Royal Dutch Shell, which operates Iran’s 200,000 barrels per day offshore Soroush and Nowruz oilfields, of “cultural imperialism”.”:

Posted Thursday 28 July 2005

Iran’s incoming President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad will be open to foreign investors and Western companies should not take fright, Foreign Ministry spokesman Hamid Reza Asefi said.

Ahmadinejad, viewed by Western countries as a conservative, takes power next month after he won an election in June in the second-biggest crude exporter of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC).

Some conservatives, who want domestic companies to work on Iranian projects, have been buoyed by comments from the new president that foreign companies will not have preferential treatment.

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Irish Times: Court rules out challenge to Shell planning permission

Irish Times: Court rules out challenge to Shell planning permission

Posted Thursday 28 July 2005

The High Court has refused to permit a local man bring a challenge to An Bord Pleanala’s granting of planning permission to Shell E&P Ireland Ltd to develop a gas terminal in connection with the off-shore Corrib gas field.

Martin Harrington, of Geesala, Ballina, who lives about 20 miles from the proposed terminal, had sought leave to bring the judicial review proceedings arising from his concerns about the granting of permission to develop the terminal at a site at Bellanaboy.

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Chicago Daily Herald, IL: Shell settles suit over tainted landfill soil

Chicago Daily Herald, IL: Shell settles suit over tainted landfill soil

Thursday 28 July 2005

By Patrick Waldron

Daily Herald Staff Writer

Shell Pipeline Co. LP has agreed to pay $155,000 worth of fines — including $50,000 to go to a Kane County recycling program — as a penalty for dumping benzene-tainted soil at Settler’s Hill landfill in Geneva.

“We are pleased that $50,000 will remain in Kane County to support electronic waste recycling,” Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan said Wednesday in a statement announcing the settlement. “Additionally, the $105,000 will support environmental enforcement efforts across the state.”

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BBC TV NEWS: Shell rides on soaring oil prices

BBC TV NEWS: Shell rides on soaring oil prices

“The Anglo-Dutch group was finally unified last week in a bid to rebuild investor confidence after last year’s oil reserves debacle. Previously the company had been co-owned by British and Dutch holding firms.”

Thursday 28 July 2005

Rocketing oil prices have helped Royal Dutch Shell to a more than 20% jump in second-quarter profits.

Shell said current cost of supply (CCS) net profits, excluding gains from the rising value of fuel stocks, were $4.62bn (£2.65bn), up from $3.66bn.

The oil giant said its oil and gas production averaged 3.526 million barrels a day.

It added it was raising the amount it would spend in exploration in 2005 and 2006 to $1.8bn a year from $1.5bn.

The Anglo-Dutch group was finally unified last week in a bid to rebuild investor confidence after last year’s oil reserves debacle. Previously the company had been co-owned by British and Dutch holding firms.

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Reuters: Royal Dutch Shell profits soar on high oil

Reuters: Royal Dutch Shell profits soar on high oil

Thu Jul 28, 2005 7:46 AM BST

LONDON (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell, the world’s third-largest oil firm by market capitalisation, reported a more than 20 percent jump in second quarter profits on Thursday on the back of high oil prices.

Shell said in a statement its second quarter current cost of supply (CCS) net profit, which excludes gains from the rising value of fuel stocks, was $4,626 million (2,654 million pounds), up from $3,663 million for the same period last year.

Excluding a non-operating charge of $545 million, the “clean” CCS result, which is the measure most watched by investors, was $5,171 million.

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MosNews (Russia): Sakhalin-2 LNG Project Under Fire From Environmentalists, Lenders

MosNews (Russia): Sakhalin-2 LNG Project Under Fire From Environmentalists, Lenders

Thursday 28 July 2005

Sakhalin Energy, the operator of the Sakhalin-2 oil and gas project, was compelled to suspend the construction of a liquefied natural gas (LNG) plant because of strong protests from environmentalists.

The information was reported on Wednesday, July 27, by Russian Nezavisimaya Gazeta (Independent Gazette) daily, which quoted analysts as saying that environmental concerns are being used as an instrument in the tough battle for Sakhalin’s vast natural resources.

The Sakhalin Regional Court overruled the State Ecological Expert Commission’s approval to construct a quay in the Aniva Bay. The court’s decision could lead to a revision of not only the investment component of the project, but also of the timeline for the pipeline’s commencement, with 2008 being the deadline. Such a situation cannot satisfy the investors (Royal Dutch/Shell owns 55%, Sakhalin Holdings B.V., a subsidiary of Japane’s Mitsui, owns 25% and Diamond Electric Sakhalin B.V., a subsidiary of Mitsubishi, has 20%) because the greater part of the project’s resources are included in contracts.

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The Guardian: Shell announces £5.8bn profits

The Guardian: Shell announces £5.8bn profits

Thursday 28 July 2005

Mark Tran

Thursday July 28, 2005

Royal Dutch Shell today reported half-year profits of £5.8bn in its first results as a unified company.

The oil giant’s profits – equivalent to £1.3m an hour – were in line with the figures released by its rival BP earlier this week, which established a new record for a UK company.

Shell said it had benefited from high oil prices, which have continued to rise this year because of strong demand, particularly from China.

The company also pledged to increase the amount of money spent on exploring for new oilfields to $1.8bn (£1.03bn) from $1.5bn both this year and next.

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BLOOMBERG: Shell 2nd-Qtr Profit Misses Estimates as Output Falls (Update4)

BLOOMBERG: Shell 2nd-Qtr Profit Misses Estimates as Output Falls (Update4)

Thursday 28 July 2005

July 28 (Bloomberg) — Royal Dutch Shell Plc, Europe’s second- biggest oil company, posted lower-than-expected profit for the second quarter as production fell. The report was the first since Shell’s British and Dutch parent companies combined.

Profit excluding gains or losses in the value of its oil inventory and a one-time charge rose 22 percent to $5.17 billion, which missed estimates of $5.4 billion, according to a Bloomberg News survey of eight analysts. Revenue, which benefited from higher oil prices, advanced 33 percent to $82.6 billion, Shell said today in a statement.

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Financial Times: Case of ex-Shell chief could make life complicated for FSA

Financial Times: Case of ex-Shell chief could make life complicated for FSA

Thursday 28 July 2005

By Barney Jopson

Published: July 28 2005

The Financial Services Authority and headstrong business executives do not mix. Following a clash with Sir David Prosser, chief executive of Legal & General, at a tribunal earlier this year, the FSA this week crossed swords in the same place with Sir Philip Watts, former chairman of Royal Dutch Shell.

L&G’s criticism of a mis-selling case against it triggered an overhaul of FSA enforcement procedures announced last week. Sir Philip’s action has the potential to prompt even more change at the regulator.

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Shell says asset swap with Gazprom to proceed despite Sakhalin cost overruns

AFX Asia (Focus): Shell says asset swap with Gazprom to proceed despite Sakhalin cost overruns

“Van der Veer told reporters in a conference call that Shell and Gazprom are currently engaged in “detailed negotiations” on the terms of the swap following the signing of a framework agreement on July 7.”: “He was commenting on newspaper reports that Gazprom felt short-changed with the exchange, given that the cost overruns and delays at Sakhalin have effectively reduced the value of the asset.”

Thursday July 28, 2005

LONDON (AFX) – Royal Dutch Shell PLC and Russian gas monopoly Gazprom are proceeding with plans to exchange major assets in Russia despite the massive cost overruns at the giant Sakhalin II gas project, said Shell chief executive Jeroen van der Veer.

Shell announced that Sakhalin-II was 10 bln usd overbudget a few days after it signed a preliminary agreement giving Gazprom a 25 pct in the project.

Shell, in turn, will get a 50 pct interest in Gazprom’s Zapolyarnoye field in Siberia, the world’s fifth largest gas deposit.

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Irish Times: Mayo gas pipeline controversy

Irish Times: Mayo gas pipeline controversy

“Shell now tells us it has been meticulous in observing environmental regulations. Would this be the same Shell oil giant which has removed billions of dollars worth of oil from the Niger delta while flouting environmental regulations for decades?

Thursday, July 28, 2005

Madam, – Shell now tells us it has been meticulous in observing environmental regulations. Would this be the same Shell oil giant which has removed billions of dollars worth of oil from the Niger delta while flouting environmental regulations for decades?

Despite international criticism Shell has yet to be held accountable for its environmental record in Nigeria. Only last month it announced a postponement of its repeated promise to end gas-flaring there.

What evidence is there that Shell can be trusted in Ireland? Royal Dutch Shell posted record profits of $5,548,000,000 in the first quarter of this year while the people of the Niger delta still experience poverty and environmental destruction? Rossport is right to say “No”. – Yours, etc,

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Debacle surrounding the Corrib gas project

Irish Independent: A lack of information

Thursday July 28, 2005

Sir – The debacle surrounding the Corrib gas project is a monument to miscommunication, misinformation and misrepresentation, whether intentional or not. Shell has been less than forthright in offering readily understood explanations of the project. Recently a representative of Shell E&P stated that, even if the processing was moved offshore, the pressure in the pipeline coming ashore would be essentially the same. This is misleading. An offshore platform could readily incorporate pressure reduction equipment and likely would do so as a step in the gas processing. As a matter of safety, there is no requirement for offshore pressure reduction but it would be a consideration in risk mitigation.

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Bumper spending knocks Shell

THE TIMES (UK): Bumper spending knocks Shell: “It said its spending programme would also reflect its involvement in Sakhalin II, the Siberian gas project where the budget has now doubled to $20 billion.”

Thursday 28 July 2005

By Miles Costello, Times Online

Royal Dutch Shell, the world’s third largest oil group, has reported a 34 per cent rise in second-quarter profits to $5.2 billion in its first set of results as a unified company.

But in a gently rising market this morning, shares in Shell had slipped 18p – or more than 1 per cent – to 1,772p.

The stock slipped as Shell confirmed a hike in the amount of capital it had invested in the second quarter to $4.1 billion, from $3.4 billion in the same quarter last year.

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Shell’s Net Jumps 35% On High Oil Prices

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL: Shell’s Net Jumps 35% On High Oil Prices

By BENOIT FAUCON

DOW JONES NEWSWIRES

July 28, 2005 10:37 a.m.

LONDON — Royal Dutch Shell Group PLC posted a 35% rise in net profit for the second quarter, buoyed mainly by high oil prices.

It was the first time the Anglo-Dutch oil giant reported earnings as a single company after unifying its twin parents, Shell Transport & Trading and Royal Dutch Petroleum, last week.

Shell, the world’s third-largest publicly traded oil company by market capitalization, said net profit rose to $5.46 billion for the three months ended June 30 from $4.05 billion a year earlier. The latest quarter’s results included charges totaling $545 million, compared to $573 million in charges for the year-earlier quarter, mostly from the fluctuating value of unrealized gas contracts in Britain and net tax charges.

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The Independent: Shell reports £1.3m-an-hour profits

The Independent: Shell reports £1.3m-an-hour profits

By David Winning, PA City Staff

Published: 28 July 2005

The oil giant Royal Dutch Shell unveiled half-year profits of £5.84 billion today, as it posted its first results as a unified company.

The figure – equivalent to £1.3 million an hour – mirrors the profits of rival BP earlier this week, which established a new record for a UK company.

Shell said its profits were boosted by the oil price rising to record highs since January and it pledged to increase the amount of money spent on exploring for new oilfields to 1.8 billion US dollars (£1.03 billion) in both this year and next.

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Financial Times: Disappointment as Shell reveals weak results

Financial Times: Disappointment as Shell reveals weak results

“Shell, which this month united its Dutch and UK holding companies, is struggling to keep up. It lags behind competitors in production growth, faces lawsuits in the US over false reserves statements and announced a $10bn cost overrun at Sakhalin-2, the flagship Russian project.”

By Carola Hoyos in London

Published: July 28 2005 19:20

Royal Dutch Shell, the world’s third biggest listed energy group, disappointed investors on Thursday as its first earnings report as a unified company revealed weaker-than-expected results.

Second-quarter cost of supply net profit, which excludes gains on fuel stock and non-operational charges, was $5.17bn, compared with expectations of $5.44bn.

Jonathan Copus, analyst at Investec Securities in London, said: “This is a disappointing set of numbers and we will be reviewing our forecasts.”

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Sky-high crude price propels Shell to within touching distance of BP

London Evening Standard: Sky-high crude price propels Shell to within touching distance of BP

Thursday 28 July 2005

By Jim Armitage

Shell’s profits surged by more than a third in the first half of the year, thanks to record oil prices.

With crude currently hovering around $60 a barrel, the company enjoyed profits of $10.2 billion (GBP5.8 billion) — up 39 percent on the same period last year. Shell is not alone in enjoying a big boost to earnings on the back of rampant oil prices. BP said earlier this week it made GBP6 billion in its half-year.

Shell is attempting to win back investor confidence following the scandal last year when it was found to have been grossly exaggerating the amount of oil it had in reserves, waiting to be pumped out of the ground. Today it stressed it would be spending $1.8 billion a year for the next two years in its hunt for new reserves.

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Shell blames protests for lay-offs

Shell has announced that it is to lay off 35 workers at the Corrib gas pipeline in County Mayo.

Friday, 26 January 2007

Shell has announced that it is to lay off 35 workers at the Corrib gas pipeline in County Mayo. The company said the decision was made as a result of the continuing protests taking place at its sites in Mayo.

Earlier, a County Mayo electrician lost a High Court attempt to stop Shell developing a gas terminal to cater for the Corrib gas field.

Martin Harrington, from Geesala, Ballina, had sought leave to bring proceedings challenging An Bord Pleanala’s decision to grant planning permission to Shell. The case is separate to the row which has resulted in the jailing of five protesters for breaching a court order in relation to the gas pipeline.

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BBC Russian Service (Western Siberia): Siberian oil far from politics

BBC Russian Service (Western Siberia): Siberian oil far from politics

“Like all the other oil majors, Shell can hardly put Russia, which accounts for almost 10% of the world’s oil, aside – no matter how harsh the weather in Siberia or in Moscow’s high offices.”

Wednesday 27 July 2005

By Alexander Koliandre

Here at the base camp of the Salym oilfield a rare visitor is greeted by a “what to do if you encounter a bear” poster and strong advice to use as much mosquito repellent as possible.

The place seems barely touched by the millions of petrodollars that gush from Russia’s pipelines every year

Standing on the western Siberian taiga (or forest) 500 kilometres from the nearest airport, the world oil markets might as well be another planet.

This unpromising spot is at the sharp end of Russia’s swashbuckling brand of capitalism – but is curiously untouched by the tumults that have shaken the oil business in the past few years.

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THE NEW YORK TIMES: Wasted Energy

THE NEW YORK TIMES: Wasted Energy

“LATELY there has been much grandstanding about the dangers of the bid by a government-backed Chinese oil company, Cnooc, for Unocal.”: ““In August 1934, Walter Teagle of Standard Oil and Henri Deterding of Royal Dutch Shell lobbied Washington to frighten Japan into moderation by hinting at a cutoff of American oil exports. The State Department demurred, but mutual tension over oil supplies escalated into paranoia and contributed to the build-up to World War II.”

By AMY MYERS JAFFE

Published: July 27, 2005

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Ulster TV: Compound linked to Mayo pipeline closed

Ulster TV: Compound linked to Mayo pipeline closed

“Shell To Sea, a group which opposes the building of the pressure pipeline, said the closure of the compound at Glengad, Erris, Co Mayo, was a tribute to the struggle of hundreds of people who had campaigned against the pipeline.”

Wednesday 27 July 2005

By: Press Association

Protesters today hailed the temporary closure of a compound linked to a controversial gas pipeline being developed in the Irish Republic by oil giant Shell.

Shell To Sea, a group which opposes the building of the pressure pipeline, said the closure of the compound at Glengad, Erris, Co Mayo, was a tribute to the struggle of hundreds of people who had campaigned against the pipeline.

Five men from Rossport, Co Mayo, are still in prison for failing to comply with an injunction preventing them from obstructing the development of the pipeline.

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