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Posts from ‘October, 2005’

ROYAL DUTCH SHELL NEWS HEADLINES OCTOBER 2005

ROYAL DUTCH SHELL NEWS HEADLINES OCTOBER 2005

AFX Europe (Focus): Royal Dutch Shell proposes to pay minority shareholders 52.21 eur/shr: “Royal Dutch Shell also said eligible UK resident shareholders can receive loan notes exchangeable into Royal Dutch Shell ‘A’ shares.”: Tuesday October 31, 2005: READ

Grampian TV (Scotland): Shell admits failures led to the deaths of two men: “Earlier this year Shell was fined a record nine hundred thousand pounds after admitting health and safety breaches.”: Monday 31 October 2005: READ

Financial Times: No case for a windfall tax on the oil industry: “In Britain, fear of a tax raid has led some analysts to warn against investing in UK oil producers.”: Monday October 31 2005: READ

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From our Shell News Archive for Tuesday 31 October 2005

From our Shell News Archive for Tuesday 31 October 2005

AFX Europe (Focus): Royal Dutch Shell proposes to pay minority shareholders 52.21 eur/shr: “Royal Dutch Shell also said eligible UK resident shareholders can receive loan notes exchangeable into Royal Dutch Shell ‘A’ shares.”: Tuesday October 31, 2005: READ

Grampian TV (Scotland): Shell admits failures led to the deaths of two men: “Earlier this year Shell was fined a record nine hundred thousand pounds after admitting health and safety breaches.”: Monday 31 October 2005: READ

Financial Times: No case for a windfall tax on the oil industry: “In Britain, fear of a tax raid has led some analysts to warn against investing in UK oil producers.”: Monday October 31 2005: READ

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From our Shell News Archive 30 October 2005

From our Shell News Archive 30 October 2005

Irish Times: Cassells to be mediator in Corrib gas dispute: “Shell is still pursuing a permanent injunction against opponents of the onshore pipeline.”: Monday October 31, 2005

Gulf Times: Irish villagers risking prison to protest Shell gas pipeline: “The Corrib gas reservoir, discovered in 1996, contains an estimated 1tn cu ft of gas and was the first significant offshore find in Ireland in 25 years.” Published: Sunday, 30 October, 2005

The New York Times: Big Oil, Big Bucks: “The companies are making money far faster than they can spend it.”: “On Thursday, Senator Bill Frist, the Republican leader, said the Senate should call executives of major oil companies to testify about high prices.”: Sunday 30 October 2005

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Shell news 29 October 2005

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL: Backlash Spreads As Profits Surge At Oil Companies: “Exxon, Shell Net $19 Billion, Fueling Calls for Profit Tax, Efforts to Boost Stockpiles”: “If there are those who abuse the free enterprise system to advantage themselves and their businesses at the expense of all Americans, they ought to be exposed, and they ought to be ashamed,”: Posted Saturday 29 October 2005: READ

Financial Times: Volcker report implicates big oil companies in oil-for-food scandal: “Well-known international oil companies used traders to distance themselves from the illegal surcharges being paid under the United Nations oil-for-food deal in Iraq, the final Volcker report has concluded.”: “BP of the UK, Anglo/Dutch Royal Dutch Shell, Total of France, and Spain’s Repsol were all named as examples of “established oil companies” involved in the oil-for-food programme before surcharges began in 2001.”: Saturday 29 October 2005: READ

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Shell’s performance beats expectations

Financial Times: Shell’s performance beats expectations

“Shell has been reviewing its leading projects since the cost of its Sakhalin 2 project in Russia doubled to $20bn earlier this year. The enthusiasm of some analysts was tempered by their expectation that its capital expenditure budget would have to rise when it is announced in December.”

Friday 28 October 2005

By Thomas Catan and Sharlene Goff

Royal Dutch Shell made the largest quarterly profit in its 98-year history this summer, despite a severe beating from the storms in the Gulf of Mexico.

The world’s third-largest oil company by market value saw its third quarter profit soar 68 per cent on the back of high oil prices and a pipeline sale in the Netherlands. The results far exceeded market expectations, sending Shell’s “B” shares up 14p to £17.91.

The company’s third-quarter “current cost of supply” (CCS) net profit – a closely watched measure that excludes gains from rising fuel stock values and one-off charges – was $5.8bn (£3.3bn) against expectations of about $5bn.

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Green groups call for windfall tax as Shell reports record earnings

The Independent: Green groups call for windfall tax as Shell reports record earnings

“Shell’s fortunes this year, on the back of soaring oil prices, are in marked contrast to last year when it was embroiled in a reserves reporting scandal that plunged into one of the worst periods in its long history. The scandal cost Sir Philip Watts his job as chairman and the company was ordered to pay fines of $120m in the US and £17m in the UK. The company agreed to pay $90m in damages to US employee shareholders who brought a class action lawsuit against the oil giant.”

Friday 28 October 2005

By Damian Reece, City Editor

Royal Dutch Shell is facing calls for a windfall tax on oil companies’ profits after announcing a 68 per cent increase in third-quarter earnings to $7.4bn (£4.1bn).

A record quarter for oil prices helped Shell deliver results that beat City expectations but prompted the ire of environmental groups and politicians.

Shareholders will benefit from Shell’s performance to the tune of $15bn, which the company is returning to investors this year in the form of share buy-backs and increased dividends. Jeroen van der Veer, the chief executive, said: “Our operational performance is paying off with good results.”

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Shell rakes in £1.5m per hour

Channel 4 News: Shell rakes in £1.5m per hour

Thurs 27 October 2005

Last Modified: 27 Oct 2005
Source: ITN

Oil giant Shell is making profits of around £1.5 million an hour, results have revealed.

The company has nearly bettered its record 2004 haul in the space of just nine months.

Surging oil prices helped to generate profits of £9.86 billion between January and September compared with £9.88 billion in the whole of 2004.

This performance was also spurred by one-off gains on the sale of assets and was in spite of lost production and damage to rigs from the summer of hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico.

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Shell’s Dutch workers threaten to strike over pensions

Forbes/AFX News Limited: Shell’s Dutch workers threaten to strike over pensions

“Workers of the Royal Dutch Shell PLC in the Netherlands have threatened to strike over planned changes in the group’s pension scheme.”: “Industry followers are worried that the strike, should it proceed, will shut Shell’s major facilities, including the 416,000-barrel-per-day Pernis refinery, the Groningen gas field, and the Moerdijk chemical plant.”

Wednesday 26 October 2005

LONDON (AFX) – Workers of the Royal Dutch Shell PLC in the Netherlands have threatened to strike over planned changes in the group’s pension scheme.

Dutch trade unions led by CNV and FNV have agreed to strike next week if Shell insists on implementing a plan to raise the retirement age of employees and force workers to contribute to their pensions.

The proposed reforms are to take effect on Jan 1 next year.

‘We gave Shell an ultimatum that by 6 pm on Oct 31, if they don’t give in to our demand (to drop the proposed changes), there’ll be a strike,’ a CNV spokeswoman told AFX News.

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Shell’s Dutch pension talks reach impasse

Investment & Pensions Europe: Shell’s Dutch pension talks reach impasse

“The main sticking point is the fact that Shell has changed the pension age from 60 to 65, while all employees will have to start paying part of the pension premiums.”

Wednesday 26 October 2005

IPE.com 26/Oct/05: NETHERLANDS – The year long negotiations between Shell Nederland and the Dutch trade unions FNV Bondgenoten and CNV Chemie have reached an impasse.

The unions have refused to accept a proposal the company has made to the Central Staff Council, where unions and employee representatives discuss issues.

According to the official statement by the unions, Shell will have until October 31 to reassess the situation and change its proposal or it will face strikes at several of its Dutch plants.

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Irish Independent: Rossport 5 must wait to learn fate

Irish Independent: Rossport 5 must wait to learn fate

“The Mayo men have already served 94 days in jail for refusing to obey a High Court order not to interfere with construction of the Corrib gas pipeline.”

Wednesday Oct 26, 2005

THE Rossport Five must wait another two weeks to see if the High Court is to punish them further over their pipeline protest.

The Mayo men have already served 94 days in jail for refusing to obey a High Court order not to interfere with construction of the Corrib gas pipeline.

Brothers Philip and Vincent McGrath, Willie Corduff, Michael O Seighin and Brendan Philbin have become heroes to many since they were jailed for contempt of court in June.

High Court President Mr Justice Joseph Finnegan told the men yesterday that he would rule in two weeks what sanction if any should be imposed on them for disobeying the court.

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Shanghai Daily news: Efforts made to reduce pollution

Shanghai Daily news: Efforts made to reduce pollution

“The city of Shanghai and Shell International Gas International Ltd will cooperate to develop clean energy and reduce air pollution by 2010 for the World Expo.”

Wednesday 26 October 2005

www.chinaview.cn 2005-10-26 09:36:34

BEIJING, Oct. 26 — The city of Shanghai and Shell International Gas International Ltd will cooperate to develop clean energy and reduce air pollution by 2010 for the World Expo.

Officials yesterday signed a cooperation agreement with Shell International Gas, forming a partnership to get rid of emission-caused air pollution.

The agreement, which does not include concrete investments from both parties, cites areas of cooperation such as joint studies on clean alternative fuels and cost-effective ways to reduce emissions, particularly for the city’s 40,000-plus cabs and 18,000 buses.

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Irish Villagers Say Shell Pipeline Is Health Hazard, Risk Jail

Bloomberg: Irish Villagers Say Shell Pipeline Is Health Hazard, Risk Jail

“Shell, which said in 2002 it expected to bring gas onshore within two years, now can’t say when it expects to begin tapping the field.”

Tuesday 25 October 2005

Oct. 25 (Bloomberg) — Willie Corduff, a farmer from Rossport in western Ireland, spent 94 days in prison for obstructing Royal Dutch/Shell Plc’s plans to build a pipeline near his village. A court will rule today on whether he needs to serve more time.

“I don’t want to go back to jail, but I will if I have to,” said Corduff, 51, as he drove from Bellanaboy to Rossport, a 30-house village perched on the edge of Broadhaven Bay in Mayo. Corduff, wearing blue jeans and green wellington boots, says he’ll do anything “within the law” to prevent the project.

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Irish Times: Dempsey accused of Corrib ‘ploy’

Irish Times: Dempsey accused of Corrib ‘ploy’

“Three weeks after their release from jail, the men told a press conference in Castlebar, Co Mayo, yesterday that neither Noel Dempsey nor his officials had made any contact with them in relation to proposed mediation.”: “Shell is still seeking a permanent injunction against opposing landowners.”

Tuesday October 25, 2005

Lorna Siggins, Marine Correspondent

The five Mayo men who return to the High Court today over their opposition to the Corrib gas onshore pipeline have accused the Minister for the Marine of using mediation as a “ploy”.

Three weeks after their release from jail, the men told a press conference in Castlebar, Co Mayo, yesterday that neither Noel Dempsey nor his officials had made any contact with them in relation to proposed mediation.

In a separate development, Mr Dempsey has been informed that there is no legal impediment if he decides to defer his own order to Shell to dismantle an illegally welded section of onshore pipeline.

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Honesty, integrity, and respect for people are core values in Shell

From our October 2005 Shell News Archive

The Way Ahead: Interview: Jeroen van der Veer: CEO, Royal Dutch Shell: “Honesty, integrity, and respect for people are core values in Shell.”

Posted Monday 24 October 2005

Jeroen van der Veer is Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Royal Dutch Shell, which operates in more than 140 countries and territories and employs more than 112,000 people. Shell is best known to the public for its service stations and for exploring and producing oil and gas on land and at sea, but the company delivers a much wider range of energy solutions and petrochemicals to customers. These include transporting and trading oil and gas, marketing natural gas, producing and selling fuel for ships and planes, generating electricity, and providing energy efficiency advice. Shell also produces and sells petrochemical building blocks to industrial customers globally and is investing in making renewable and lower-carbon energy sources competitive for large-scale use.

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Shell to step up upstream investment in Middle East

Khaleej Times (United Arab Emirates): Shell to step up upstream investment in Middle East

“Global oil giant Royal Dutch Shell said it would significantly boost investments in the Middle East’s upstream sector following the recent signing of landmark business agreements in Abu Dhabi, Qatar, Oman and Libya”

23 October 2005

BY ISAAC JOHN

DUBAI — Global oil giant Royal Dutch Shell said it would significantly boost investments in the Middle East’s upstream sector following the recent signing of landmark business agreements in Abu Dhabi, Qatar, Oman and Libya.

“During the past five years, Shell Upstream alone has invested some $2 billion in the region, and this figure is set to increase significantly,” said Raoul Restucci, Executive Vice-President for Shell Exploration & Production for the Middle East and the CIS.

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Shell cost over-runs in Russia, Nigeria, Qatar, Canada and Kazakhstan

From our October 2005 Shell News Archive

Times Online: Capital expenditure will be a key number in Shell’s results. Citigroup expects capex to rise by $5 billion to $20 billion a year because of cost over-runs at facilities in Russia, Nigeria, Qatar, Canada and Kazakhstan. Such spending will not help earnings.”

Posted Saturday October 22, 2005

EXTRACT FROM BUSINESS WEEK ARTICLE

Times Online’s guide to the week’s business stories. By Bryce Elder

Shell seems as good a place to start as any. Third-quarter earnings growth at Europe’s second-largest oil company is expected to show the effects of hurricane-hit lower production.

Net income for the quarter is expected at between $4.37 billion and $5.92 billion, up 18 per cent at the median compared with $4.38 billion previously. That would be the slowest growth since the second half of 2004, when quarterly earnings surged by as much as 200 per cent as oil prices rocketed. Like BP two days earlier, Shell’s annual production target of between 3.5 million and 3.8 million barrels of oil equivalent per day may be at risk due to stoppages.

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Irish Times: Corrib gas project talks under threat

Irish Times: Corrib gas project talks under threat

“The future of mediation talks over the 900 million Corrib gas project for north Mayo hung in the balance last night, as the five recently released opponents of the onshore pipeline expressed serious concern about the Government’s latest action.”

Friday October 21, 2005

Lorna Siggins, Marine Correspondent

The future of mediation talks over the 900 million Corrib gas project for north Mayo hung in the balance last night, as the five recently released opponents of the onshore pipeline expressed serious concern about the Government’s latest action.

The men are due to meet today following confirmation by the Minister for the Marine that he is “considering legal issues” which would allow him to defer his own order to dismantle an illegally welded section of the high pressure pipeline.

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WIPO refuses to order transfer of domain names critical of Shell

Legalupload.co.uk: WIPO refuses to order transfer of domain names such as tellshell.org that were critical of Shell

“The WIPO panel found that Shell clearly had rights in the Shell brand in 190 countries and the domain names were confusingly similar to Shell’s brand. However, Donovan had a legitimate interest in the names and had not registered them in bad faith as he was using them to exercise his right to free speech and criticise Shell.”

Posted Friday 21 October 2005

Shell, the multinational petrol business, has failed to persuade the World Intellectual Property Organisation to order the transfer of various Shell domain names to it under the Uniform Domain Name Dispute Resolution Policy. The Uniform Dispute Resolution Policy provides a quick arbitration procedure for disputes over top level domain names such as ‘.com’ and ‘.org’. WIPO is one of the accredited arbitration bodies that can hear domain name disputes under that procedure.

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Irish Times: Judge rejects pipeline claim against Shell

Irish Times: Judge rejects pipeline claim against Shell

“Yesterday, Mr Justice Finnegan rejected claims by the Rossport Five Campaign that Shell had breached an undertaking to the court that it would not carry out works on lands owned by three of the five and other parties which were linked to the pipeline development.”

Thursday Oct 20, 2005

The president of the High Court yesterday declared he was satisfied Shell had carried out no unauthorised works on lands owned by some of the Rossport Five, who were jailed for breach of court orders made after they objected to works linked to the installation of the high-pressure Corrib gas pipeline.

However, the issue of whether there were unauthorised works by Shell relating to the laying and welding of pipes on other lands was a matter between the company and the Minister for the Marine, Mr Justice Joseph Finnegan said. This issue was not one before the court.

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Olomoro community alleges dumping of toxic waste by Shell

From our October 2005 Shell News Archive

Olomoro community alleges dumping of toxic waste by Shell

“Olomoro Community in Delta State led by renowned Environmentalist, Dr George Idodo-Umeh, yesterday raised an alarm over the spread of strange diseases in the area due to the illegal dumping of toxic waste in the River Areba by the Shell Producing and Developing Company”

Thursday 20 October 2005

By Osaro Okhomina

BENIN CITY — Olomoro Community in Delta State led by renowned Environmentalist, Dr.George Idodo-Umeh, yesterday raised an alarm over the spread of strange diseases in the area due to the illegal dumping of toxic waste in the River Areba by the Shell Producing and Developing Company (SPDC), alleging that over 50 persons were killed due to the consumption of fishes contaminated with heavy metals and other toxic chemicals.

The elders of the community, who were led to the Benin Office of Vanguard yesterday by Dr George Idodo-Umeh and armed with a survey conducted by him on the damage done to the river by the alleged deposition of liquid and solid waste, challenged the Federal and State Governments and the oil company to conduct a joint survey on the waste and come out with a control measure to save the lives of their people.

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Rossport Five ‘constrained’ by pending High Court case

Western People (Ireland): Rossport Five ‘constrained’ by pending High Court case

Wednesday 19 October 2005

Mr Micheal Ó Seighin, one of the Rossport Five, made a brief appearance at the public consultation where Dr Mark Garavan, Spokesperson for Shell to Sea made a statement on behalf of the men.

Dr Garavan explained that the statement was the men’s way of indicating their willingness to engage constructively in resolving the Corrib Gas crisis. It provided them with a way in which to explain why they felt it was impossible for them to participate. Public consultations should be held prior to decisions being made.

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Shell’s Sakhalin-2 financing package seen delayed

Reuters: Shell’s Sakhalin-2 financing package seen delayed

“LONDON: Royal Dutch Shell Plc looks set to miss a target to agree a $5bn financing package for its Sakhalin-2 gas project by the end of the year…”

Wednesday 19 October 2005

LONDON: Royal Dutch Shell Plc looks set to miss a target to agree a $5bn financing package for its Sakhalin-2 gas project by the end of the year, due to delays in securing a loan from the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD).

EBRD spokeswoman Vanora Bennett said on Tuesday the lender had not yet decided when it will begin a 120-day public consultation period on its part of the package, suggesting overall approval will be in early 2006 at the earliest.

The EBRD is concerned that the project may not meet its environmental policies.

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Shell considers third train at Sakhalin-2

UPI Energy Watch: Shell considers third train at Sakhalin-2

“A huge and diverse array of technical and environmental challenges have surrounded the project, including the need to reroute offshore pipelines to bypass feeding grounds for an endangered species of whale. In July, the Sakhalin Energy partners announced a massive revision to the project budget — to $20 billion from $10 billion — and a delay to first LNG deliveries.”

Wednesday 19 October 2005

Intl. Intelligence

By ANDREA R. MIHAILESCU

United Press International

Shell and Japanese partners Mitsui and Mitsubishi are evaluating options for a third train at their Sakhalin-2 LNG development on Russia’s Pacific Shelf.

Gas to supply a third train could come from a variety of sources, David Greer, deputy chief executive of Sakhalin Energy, the project operating company, said last Thursday during a presentation to an industry gathering in Scotland.

“The issue is getting the additional gas that would be required,” Greer said. “We are looking at deeper prospects in (the) Lunskoye (gas field). We have some space for a third train. It will be a question of earmarking the most appropriate reserves.” But a third train “wouldn’t be available much before 2012,” he said.

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Ousted dictators

From our October 2005 Shell News Archive

The Seoul Times: NOC of Libya, Shell Agree on Major Gas Deal

“Shell’s Executive Director for Exploration and Production, Mr Malcolm Brinded, said: We are delighted to be back in Libya and honoured to work together with NOC…”: “I am excited about concluding this major agreement.”

Tuesday, October 18, 2005

By Jamal Al Majaida
Middle East & Africa

The National Oil Corporation of the Great Socialist People’s Libyan Arab Jamahiriya (NOC) and Shell Exploration and Production Libya GmbH have reached a long-term agreement for a major gas exploration and development deal.

The agreement covers the rejuvenation and upgrade of the existing LNG Plant at Marsa Al-Brega on the Libyan coast, together with exploration and development of five areas located in the heart of Libya’s major oil and gas producing Sirte Basin.

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Ex-Shell employees suit within time frame

New Straits Times (Malaysia): ‘Ex-Shell employees’ suit within time frame’

“On Sept 20, 2004, the High Court in Miri ruled in favour of the ex-employees and said the retirement benefit under the Retirement Benefit Fund was ultra vires the Act. Sarawak Shell Berhad and Sabah Shell Petroleum Company Ltd filed an appeal.”

Tuesday 18 October 2005

PUTRAJAYA, Mon. – The Court of Appeal today ruled that it has the jurisdiction to decide whether former employees of Sabah and Sarawak Shell had filed their civil action within six years.

A total of 398 ex-employees had sought a court ruling on whether their employers’ decision to deduct their contributions before paying out retirement benefits to them was against the Employees Provident Fund Act.

On Sept 20, 2004, the High Court in Miri ruled in favour of the ex-employees and said the retirement benefit under the Retirement Benefit Fund was ultra vires the Act.

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Irish Times: Minister will consider deferral of order

Irish Times: Minister will consider deferral of order

“The Mayo-based Shell to Sea campaign described the proposal yesterday as “incredible”. It has been calling on the company for weeks to follow the ministerial order and dismantle the illegally welded section – which was reported by The Irish Times last July.”

Tuesday October 18, 2005

Lorna Siggins, Marine Correspondent

Minister for the Marine Noel Dempsey says he will “consider” a call by some north Mayo residents for a deferral of his dismantling order for the illegally welded section of the Shell onshore gas pipeline.

The Minister was responding to a statement issued by the Pro-Erris Gas Group (PEGG) yesterday, in which it proposed the dismantling be postponed until the Minister’s new safety review is published.

The group said that if the safety review endorsed the onshore pipeline, Shell should be fined a minimum of 250,000 instead. This money should be used “exclusively” on “worthwhile projects” within the Kilcommon parish, the group said in the statement, issued by its chairman, Michael Healy.

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Merer says Shell will make billions-dollar investment in Iran oil sector

Tehran Times (Iran): Merer says Shell will make billions-dollar investment in Iran oil sector

“Chairman of the Shell companies in Iran, Yves Merer, said here Sunday the Anglo-Dutch oil giant would make an investment worth billions of dollars in the Islamic Republic’s industry.”

Monday 17 October 2005

Tehran Times Economic Desk

TEHRAN (MNA) – Chairman of the Shell companies in Iran, Yves Merer, said here Sunday the Anglo-Dutch oil giant would make an investment worth billions of dollars in the Islamic Republic’s industry.

Merer, who talked to Fars News Agency, added the demand for energy, including oil, would soar in the future but oil prices would keep fluctuating. He reiterated, “The Shell will inject billions of dollars into Iran’s industry if the country pays more heed to investment.

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Shell’s pipeline costs overflow to $22bn

From our October 2005 Shell news archive

The Observer: Shell’s pipeline costs overflow to $22bn

“The financial crisis has prompted Gazprom, the state-owned Russian energy giant, to delay rubber-stamping a deal that would see it take a 25 per cent stake in Sakhalin-2.”: “Shell is desperately trying to secure bank loans to help finance Sakhalin-2, which it says will generate $45bn worth of oil and liquefied natural gas.”

Sunday 16 October 2005

Nick Mathiason

Sunday October 16, 2005

The escalating financial crisis at one of Shell’s most crucial energy projects, already massively over budget, has taken a turn for the worse.

It is understood that the Sakhalin-2 gas and oil pipeline project, which originally had a budget of $10 billion, could now cost $22bn. The scheme will transport oil and gas from an island off the east coast of Russia.

Last month the Anglo-Dutch energy giant admitted the project would cost around $20bn, but sources close to the Sakhalin Energy Investment Company, which Shell currently controls, suggest the final bill could be even higher.

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Shell vows commitment to Corrib gas field

RTE NEWS (IRELAND): Shell vows commitment to Corrib gas field

It has also announced that work will begin next week on dismantling a section of the pipeline which was welded without the consent of the Department of the Environment.

Posted Saturday 15 October 2005

Shell Ireland said today it remains fully committed to developing the Corrib Gas Field which lies off the Co Mayo coast.

However, it said it has no plans to bow to public pressure to build an offshore terminal or change the route of a controversial onshore pipeline.

The company says it is working to address the safety concerns of local landowners and it welcomes what it describes as ‘an increased level of co-operation’ between all sides over the past two weeks.

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Shell ‘committed’ to solving Corrib issues

Irish Times: Shell ‘committed’ to solving Corrib issues

Saturday Oct 15, 2005

Lorna Siggins, Marine Correspondent

Shell E&P Ireland says it is “fully committed” to completing the 900 million Corrib gas project in Mayo and to finding a solution relating to all the issues raised by some local landowners on the onshore pipeline route.

The company’s managing director Andy Pyle said in Ballina, Co Mayo, yesterday that all sides needed to work together in a constructive manner. He said he welcomed progress made at all of the project sites in Mayo over the past fortnight.

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Shell Says It’s `Committed’ to Controversial Irish Gas Pipeline

BLOOMBERG: Shell Says It’s `Committed’ to Controversial Irish Gas Pipeline

“Five Irishmen spent 94 days in jail for refusing to obey a court order not to interfere with the pipeline to an onshore processing plant. They and their supporters say it’s being built on “unstable bog land” close to homes, and that the proposed refinery will pollute a nearby nature reserve and local water.”

Friday 14 October 2005

Oct. 14 (Bloomberg) — Royal Dutch Shell Plc, Europe’s second-largest oil company, said it plans to proceed with a controversial pipeline in western Ireland to pump gas onshore from the 900 million-euro ($1.1 billion) Corrib field.

Shell is “fully committed both to the completion of the Corrib Project and to finding a solution that will deal with all of the issues concerning some local landowners,” Shell E&P Ireland Ltd. Managing Director Andy Pyle said today in an e-mailed statement.

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BP has greater ambitions for China than any oil major has ever dared to consider possible

Financial Times: BP has greater ambitions for China than any oil major has ever dared to consider possible

“Shell and CNOOC are setting up a $4.3bn refinery and chemicals plant in southern China, which makes the Anglo-Dutch company one of the largest foreign investors in the country.”

Friday 14 October 2005

By Enid Tsui in Hong Kong

Published: October 14 2005

Lord Browne’s ambitions in China goes far beyond what western oil majors have ever achieved in one of the world’s largest energy markets.

If BP gets its way, it may receive a significant stake in Sinopec, marking the first time a state-owned Chinese oil giant allows foreign influence into its boardroom.

The country’s oil and gas sector is dominated by the three national companies – Sinopec, PetroChina and CNOOC. While their dominance has historically overshadowed private sector investment in the sector, these behemoths are no strangers to working with overseas partners.

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Irish Times: Corrib hearing aims for ‘post hoc justification’

Irish Times: Corrib hearing aims for ‘post hoc justification’

“Minister for the Marine Noel Dempsey is trying to provide a “post hoc” justification for Government decisions on the Corrib gas project, according to the five Mayo men who spent 94 days in prison for their opposition to the onshore pipeline.”:”What is crucially important to understand is that our opposition to the proposed pipeline is grounded firmly on our analysis of the consequences of an accident, given the extraordinary proximity of the pipeline to our homes. We say that this would be catastrophic for ourselves and our community,” they said.”

Thursday Oct 13, 2005

Lorna Siggins, Marine Correspondent, in Geesala, Co Mayo

Minister for the Marine Noel Dempsey is trying to provide a “post hoc” justification for Government decisions on the Corrib gas project, according to the five Mayo men who spent 94 days in prison for their opposition to the onshore pipeline.

In a statement read at yesterday’s public hearing into the pipeline, the men acknowledged the principle of consultation and public engagement, but said it should have occurred before key approvals were granted.

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Irish Times: Controversy over Mayo pipeline

Irish Times: Controversy over Mayo pipeline

“I should make it clear that during the course of their imprisonment, my concern was to make constructive proposals to the Government, Shell and the men themselves that might lead to their release.”

Thursday Oct 13, 2005

Madam, – In a letter in your edition of October 11th, five men from Rossport, Co Mayo criticise my attitude to their imprisonment. I want to make it clear that at all times I believe the rule of law must be upheld in a democracy.

If the law is inappropriate or inadequate then it should be changed, but until it is changed it must be upheld.

I should make it clear that during the course of their imprisonment, my concern was to make constructive proposals to the Government, Shell and the men themselves that might lead to their release.

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Shell to pay $10.75 million settlement for gas station violations

From our October 2005 Shell news archive

San Diego Union Tribune: Shell to pay $10.75 million settlement for gas station violations

“County and city officials announced Wednesday they had reached a $10.75 million settlement with Shell Oil Co. over environmental-health violations at its local gas stations dating back to 1999.”

Wednesday 12 October 2005

By Karen Kucher
UNION-TRIBUNE BREAKING NEWS TEAM

SAN DIEGO – County and city officials announced Wednesday they had reached a $10.75 million settlement with Shell Oil Co. over environmental-health violations at its local gas stations dating back to 1999.

“Today the environment in San Diego just got safer,” District Attorney Bonnie Dumanis said at a news conference downtown that also included City Attorney Michael Aguirre, the head of the county’s Environmental Health Department and other county and city lawyers.

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Irish Times: Controversy over Mayo pipeline

Irish Times: Controversy over Mayo pipeline

“…the whole saga, has created a dichotomy between the so-called Rossport Five (“good”) and Shell (“bad”) that could well result in there being no way through the impasse, and in thousands of people (the silent majority, perhaps?) being denied access to natural gas as a source of power”

Tuesday Oct 11, 2005

Madam, – We wish to commend all those who rallied to our assistance this summer. It is important to do this following the nonsensical assertions by Fine Gael leader Enda Kenny on RTE’s The Week in Politics on October 3rd (The Irish Times, October 4th).

He asserted that his office was picketed by Sinn Fein and he rejected criticism of his stance on the Corrib crisis as a Sinn Fein-inspired campaign because of his opposition to a proposed deal over the release of IRA prisoners.

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Geelong Advertiser (Australia): Panel to help Shell do `a better job’

Geelong Advertiser (Australia): Panel to help Shell do `a better job’

“SHELL Geelong will set up a new “expertise-based” community advisory panel, after acknowledging the refinery had failed to meet public expectations.”

Tuesday, October 11, 2005
Geelong Advertiser

SHELL Geelong will set up a new “expertise-based” community advisory panel, after acknowledging the refinery had failed to meet public expectations.

Geelong refinery manager Geoff Ellison said Shell accepted community expectations of the refinery’s performance had not been met, but was “committed to addressing these concerns in the context of a broader consultation and engagement program”.

Mr Ellison said he wanted Shell to play a more active role in the community to address “key stakeholder issues”.

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Responsibility for the disadvantaged lies with all of us

Financial Times: Responsibility for the disadvantaged lies with all of us

“Mr McCredie described the increasing manifestations of insecurity that Shell and other oil companies face around the world. Threats include attacks on oil facilities, corrupt officials, industrial espionage, kidnapping, piracy and the potential for large-scale political instability.”

10 October 2005

By Gordon Thompson

Published: October 10 2005

From Mr Gordon Thompson.

Sir, The FT reports (“Oil groups face rise in threats to security”, October 4) on remarks by Ian McCredie, head of Global Security Services at Shell International, at a conference on political risk.

Mr McCredie described the increasing manifestations of insecurity that Shell and other oil companies face around the world. Threats include attacks on oil facilities, corrupt officials, industrial espionage, kidnapping, piracy and the potential for large-scale political instability. Many of these threats derive from weak governance, but that in turn reflects deeper problems that many societies experience in meeting the demands of the modern era.

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O’Malley concerned by Shell’s Sakhalin-2 project

Sunday Business Post (Ireland): O’Malley concerned by Shell’s Sakhalin-2 project

“Pitted against Shell is an array of international non-government organisations (NGOs), battling on environmental and social issues on the bleak island nine time zones away from Moscow.”: “Does he think the board is likely to reject the Sakhalin-2 project? “I would hope so, if the facts dictate it,” he said.”

Sunday 9 October 2005

By Ann Cahill

For the past eight years, the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) has been mulling over a loan application from a Shell-led conglomerate to develop huge oil and gas reserves in the far east of Russia.

A final decision on a loan package of about $5 billion is expected by Christmas for the contentious Sakhalin Island project. The development is the world’s most expensive – and the single biggest ever considered by the EBRD – so it is not surprising that the bank, of which Ireland is a member, is putting such time and effort into it.

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Royal Dutch Shell Reserves Scandal

The Independent: Jeremy Warner’s Outlook: As it struggles to find its raison d’être, should Cable & Wireless really be buying Energis? “A year ago, the FSA imposed a £17m fine on Shell in full and final settlement of the scandal of mis-stated reserves. To most people this would seem a much more heinous case of market abuse. Apparently knowingly, the company had overstated its reserves over a period of years, yet so far there have been no criminal prosecutions, only a fine which though large is of barely any significance at all for a company of Shell’s size. Shell is a Goliath of a company, with teams of lawyers and compliance officers pawing over everything it says and does, yet still it failed to correct the stream of misleading statements on reserves that were issued from the late 1990s onwards.”

Saturday 8 October 2005

Just nothing as AIT two get harsh justice

Published: 08 October 2005

The Cable & Wireless turnaround story stumbled badly yesterday, raising fresh doubts about the future of this one-time stalwart of the telecommunications world.

C&W was one of the first privatisations of the 1980s and for a while it blossomed in the excitement of telecommunications deregulation which the Thatcher government pushed through, launching Mercury, the first direct rival to the British Telecom monopoly, and later One2One, the mobile phone operator. Yet somewhere in the mid-1990s it lost its way and it has been struggling, both strategically and operationally, ever since.

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Royal Dutch Shell European Fraud

Financial Times: It is vital that we all work together, says SEC

“…Cox… became chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission in August…”: “He highlighted US “scandals” at Enron, WorldCom, HealthSouth, Global Crossing, Qwest and Tyco. But he said they were not unique to the US, and noted “European frauds” at Vivendi, Royal Dutch Shell and Parmalat. “Cross-border collaboration in international enforcement is growing in importance because massive financial frauds by major market participants have rocked the global financial world,” he said.”

Friday 7 October 2005

By Andrew Parker in New York

Published: October 7 2005

The new head of the chief US financial watchdog yesterday pledged co-operation with overseas securities regulators to nurture investor confidence.

Christopher Cox, who became chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission in August, said cross-border collaboration was perhaps most important in dealing with wrongdoing by companies and individuals.

His speech, to a conference of lawyers, was the first time Mr Cox had publicly addressed the international dimension of his work.

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Huge public pressure forced Shell to lift an injunction

FROM OUR SHELL NEWS ARCHIVE OCTOBER 2004

The Guardian (UK): Don’t be defeatist: the power of protest is alive and well

“…in Ireland last week huge public pressure forced Shell to lift an injunction which had seen five anti-pipeline farmers jailed for 94 days.”

Friday 7 October 2005

The government cannot stifle dissent, say Helen Steel and Dave Morris

George Monbiot looked at some of the wide range of repressive measures increasingly being used to undermine the public’s right to protest (Protest is criminalised and the huffers and puffers say nothing, October 4). The government is exploiting every opportunity to extend its powers over us all. Its aim is to try to protect the status quo so that those who have wealth and power can continue to dominate our world, untroubled by anyone fighting back.

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Shell may face contempt proceedings over pipeline breach

FROM OUR SHELL NEWS ARCHIVE OCTOBER 2005

Western People: Shell may face contempt proceedings over pipeline breach

“As the Rossport Five walked to freedom in the High Court on Friday after 94 days in jail, Shell oil company executives, who had demanded their imprisonment in the first place, were themselves having to face potential contempt of court issues.”

Posted Thursday, October 06, 2005

By Ray Managh at the High Court, Dublin

As the Rossport Five walked to freedom in the High Court on Friday after 94 days in jail, Shell oil company executives, who had demanded their imprisonment in the first place, were themselves having to face potential contempt of court issues.

High Court President, Mr Justice Joseph Finnegan, who released the men to the cheers of their families and friends, told counsel for Shell, Mr Patrick Hanratty, he wanted the company to address its breach of an undertaking not to do anything not permitted by the licence of Minister for the Marine, Noel Dempsey.

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Shell And Conservation Groups Face Off

All Headline News: Shell And Conservation Groups Face Off

“Some groups say it may take very little to drive the whales – which now number about 100 animals – to extinction. The Worldwide Fund for Nature (WWF) has slammed Shell – which leads the Sakhalin Energy consortium operating the project – on its decision to push ahead and install the platform for its Sakhalin phase two oil and gas project this summer.”

Posted 6 October 2005

Danielle George

All Headline News Staff Reporter

London, England (AHN) – The UK Export Credit Guarantee Department will continue discussions about financing Shell’s $20 billion project in Russia’s Far East. The project threatens a grey whale feeding ground, resting near the site of an oil platform.

Some groups say it may take very little to drive the whales – which now number about 100 animals – to extinction.

The Worldwide Fund for Nature (WWF) has slammed Shell – which leads the Sakhalin Energy consortium operating the project – on its decision to push ahead and install the platform for its Sakhalin phase two oil and gas project this summer.

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Controversy over Mayo pipeline

Irish Times: Controversy over Mayo pipeline

“…a presence will be maintained in the area to keep an eye on things and to monitor any breaches of the “ceasefire” which may be perpetrated by Shell or the State.”

Thursday 6 October 2005

Madam, – There have been many unsung heroes (and heroines) in the protracted dispute over the proposed gas terminal at Rossport, Co Mayo. I would like to draw attention to one rarely mentioned group, namely the people from all over Ireland and further afield who have staffed the protest camp which is situated right on the route of the proposed high-pressure gas pipeline at Rossport,

This camp, which is in the middle of an old turf bog, and which has been occupied round the clock since August even though it is gradually sinking into the aforementioned bog, is due to he dismantled later this week owing to the hardships and difficulties in trying to continue occupying it in the face of Atlantic gales and storms. The protesters intend to return in the spring. In the meantime a presence will be maintained in the area to keep an eye on things and to monitor any breaches of the “ceasefire” which may be perpetrated by Shell or the State.

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The Financial Times: Oil groups face rise in threats to security

By Jimmy Burns and Thomas Catan in London
Published: October 5 2005 03:00 | Last updated: October 5 2005 03:00

* Shell warning on risks from terrorism and corruption

* ‘It is very uncomfortable to produce oil with guns’

International terrorism, corruption and local activism are threatening oil operations in many countries, one of the sector’s senior security advisers has warned.

Ian McCredie, head of Global Security Services at Shell International, said the growing risks had forced Royal Dutch Shell to make its own security arrangements in “hostile environments”, covering many of the most important areas in which it operates. He pointed to 14 oil producing regions where local security forces were judged to be “largely ineffective”.

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BP spells out losses from hurricanes

Financial Times: BP spells out losses from hurricanes

“Royal Dutch Shell, BP’s Anglo-Dutch rival, has suffered extensive damage at its Mars platform, of which BP also owns 28.5 per cent. Shell hopes to have 60 per cent of its usual 450,000 barrels a day of production back on line by the end of the year, though it may not be producing from its Cognac field again until next year. Mr Lanstone calculates that Shell is likely to have lost at least 100,000 barrels a day of production this quarter because of the hurricanes, and 60,000 barrels a day of refined output.”

Wednesday 5 October 2005

By Thomas Catan and Carola Hoyos

Published: October 5 2005

BP on Tuesday became the first big oil company to put a price on the hurricanes that have ravaged the Gulf of Mexico in recent weeks.

Its loss of 145,000 barrels of oil equivalent a day in production was double the amount expected by some analysts, and means the company will miss its production target of 4.1m to 4.2m barrels of oil equivalent a day, set out in February.

The problems at the world’s second-biggest oil company by market value sent shock waves through the industry, deepening concern of the impact on rivals.

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Oil groups face rise in threats to security

Financial Times: Oil groups face rise in threats to security

“Shell has faced terrorist threats in Kuwait, Iraq, Saudi Arabia and Pakistan this year. One of its chartered vessels was hijacked in Somalia.”

Wednesday 5 October 2005

By Jimmy Burns and Thomas Catan in London

* Shell warning on risks from terrorism and corruption

* ‘It is very uncomfortable to produce oil with guns’

International terrorism, corruption and local activism are threatening oil operations in many countries, one of the sector’s senior security advisers has warned.

Ian McCredie, head of Global Security Services at Shell International, said the growing risks had forced Royal Dutch Shell to make its own security arrangements in “hostile environments”, covering many of the most important areas in which it operates. He pointed to 14 oil producing regions where local security forces were judged to be “largely ineffective”.

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Hurricanes leave behind £4bn bill for oil giants

Daily Telegraph: Hurricanes leave behind £4bn bill for oil giants

“Similar problems are likely to dent Shell’s third-quarter figures with production from the Gulf down from 450,000 boepd to 160,000 boepd because of the storms at the end of last month.”

Wednesday 5 October 2005

By Christopher Hope, Business Correspondent (Filed: 05/10/2005)

The world’s biggest oil and gas companies are facing a $7.5billion (£4.3billion) bill from the hurricanes that lashed the Gulf of Mexico.

The news emerged as BP, the world’s number two oil and gas company, said the impact of hurricanes Rita and Katrina had knocked $700m (£400m) off its third-quarter profits.

Analysts at Wood MacKenzie estimated that 45m barrels of oil and 220billion cubic feet of gas, worth between $4billion and $5billion in lost revenues, had been “shut in” by the storms.

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Geelong Advertiser (Australia): EPA Slams Shell

Geelong Advertiser (Australia): EPA Slams Shell

THE head of the EPA hit out at Shell Geelong yesterday saying it was failing to meet its environmental obligations.He made the claims as the EPA levied Shell Geelong with a $10,000 fine after two breaches of its licence.”

Saturday October 1, 2005

THE head of the EPA hit out at Shell Geelong yesterday saying it was failing to meet its environmental obligations.

He made the claims as the EPA levied Shell Geelong with a $10,000 fine after two breaches of its licence.

The EPA said an oil leak into Corio Bay and a visible plume from the refinery’s sulphur recovery unit stack were the reason for the fine.

Shell has a month to pay the fine or faces court action.

EPA acting chairman Bruce Dawson said the oil leak occurred in May or June and was picked-up when the environmental body’s analyses of oil from the bay matched oil from the company’s jetty pipe flange.

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