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Royal Dutch Shell: History vs Present Behavior

“Mr V enjoys a new +22% salary up from 3.2M in ’09 to 4.4M. Now don’t get me wrong, he did an excellent job of getting rid of ~6000 employees and made sure all who followed the rules were also rewarded, whether they drank too much, sexually accosted their underlings, had sex on company property, or perhaps circumvented environmental regulations…”

Posting on Shell Blog by “alwayswary” on Dec 2nd, 2010 at 1:29 am

We can look at this history vs present behavior in another way. As I stated previously, the move from whole system/eco-sustainability toward dominance of the fittest, is where corrupt ethical and moral practices displace responsibility. The ‘dialogue’ that is taking place has been loud and clear for the past couple of years: managers play with US regulators, managers indulge in hedonistic self-centered activities, we indulge in the pursuit of energy profits even in Iran, AND rewards keep flowing for top leaders.

Mr V enjoys a new +22% salary up from 3.2M in ’09 to 4.4M. Now don’t get me wrong, he did an excellent job of getting rid of ~6000 employees and made sure all who followed the rules were also rewarded, whether they drank too much, sexually accosted their underlings, had sex on company property, or perhaps circumvented environmental regulations. …so… do you hear the ‘dialogue’ of alignment?

Are we behaving much different than any other time energy extraction and profit became the idol. We are behaving like this at all levels in the organization (internally) and in our relationship with the world. Dialogue no longer takes place. The conversation for alignment becomes one-sided, and all who want to survive in the big-oil game, become servant to the indulgences required to compete.

Don’t look to see a change in Shell’s moral or ethical behavior, internally or as a world citizen, unless it is a change that serves someone, and ultimately the organization. I agree, greed is the evil that replaces responsibility. But let’s face it; the rewards for the skilled and greedy, far outweigh any motivation to care for anything beyond self and the enterprise.

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