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Shell to axe 380 finance jobs in Glasgow in favour of cheaper offices overseas

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By Emily Gosden, energy editor: 16 NOVEMBER 2016 • 1:38PM

Royal Dutch Shell is to axe 380 jobs in Glasgow as it shuts its only UK finance operations office in favour of cheaper locations in Poland, India, South Africa, Malaysia and the Philippines.

The oil giant’s announcement that it plans to close its Bothwell Street office in the city as part of its cost-cutting drive brings the total number of jobs shed from its UK operations over the past 18 months to more than 1,350.

Staff in the Glasgow office, who undertake back-office administrative tasks such as processing invoices and managing travel and expenses, face “involuntary severance” as Shell moves their work to other offices in its “global Shell Business Operations network”.

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Shell jobs axed as report warns on future for oil market

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Wednesday 16 November 2016

Shell is to axe its Glasgow operation with the loss of 380 jobs as a new report warns of a “boom/bust” cycle in the oil industry.

The cuts are in response to the low oil price – which is already hurting the Scottish economy amid thousands of job cuts in North Sea production.

Shell said the decision to close its finance operation in Glasgow, which will take place by 2018, came about as it was taking “difficult choices” in order to remain competitive.

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Oil chiefs under fire over ‘pathetic’ new climate investment fund

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Emily Gosden, energy editor: 4 NOVEMBER 2016 • 7:53PM

Oil giants including BP and Shell have been pilloried by climate campaigners after disclosing their annual contributions to a much-hyped new green investment fund would be less than BP chief Bob Dudley earned last year.

Mr Dudley and Royal Dutch Shell chief executive Ben van Beurden were among industry heavyweights who appeared at an event in London to announce plans by the Oil and Gas Climate Initiative (OGCI) to invest $1bn in “innovative low emissions technologies” over the next ten years.

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Hold the champagne

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screen-shot-2016-11-03-at-14-50-16By Ed Crooks, November 4, 2016

If you are looking forward to the oil industry recovery, you shouldn’t break out the champagne just yet.

Over the past eight days, the world’s largest listed oil companies have released third quarter earnings reports. From all of them, the message was that while the worst might be over, they were still facing a long hard road ahead.

The snap reactions from the stock market were mixed: positive for  ChevronRoyal Dutch ShellTotal and ConocoPhillips; negative for ExxonMobilBPEniStatoilPetrochina and Cnooc.

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Shell, Total CEOs Question Solar in Room Full of Solar Investors

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By Anna Hirtenstein: 3 November 2016

When executives from some of the world’s biggest oil companies question the ability of solar energy to make money in a roomful of renewables investors, awkwardness ensues.

That’s what happened Thursday at the Energy for Tomorrow conference in Paris, where the chief executive officers of Royal Dutch Shell Plc and Total SA said solar power isn’t profitable.

“Growth of renewables has been remarkable but capacity of industry to make money in that segment has been remarkably absent,’’ Shell CEO Ben van Beurden said during a panel discussion. “The 10 largest solar companies collectively never paid a cent of dividends.’’

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Big Oil Slowly Adapts to a Warming World

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By CLIFFORD KRAUSSNOV. 3, 2016

In a warming world, Big Oil doesn’t look quite so big anymore.

A global glut of oil and natural gas has sent prices tumbling over the last two years, and profits are evaporating. Improving auto fuel efficiency standards threaten to depress oil consumption eventually, and fleets of electric vehicles are gradually emerging in China and a few other important markets.

Perhaps most troubling for oil companies over the long term is the goal — agreed to last December by virtually every country in the world at a climate conference in Paris — of staving off a rise in average global temperatures of more than 2 degrees Celsius above preindustrial levels.

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Oil majors join forces in climate push with renewable energy fund

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By Ron Bousso | LONDON

Top oil companies including Saudi Aramco and Shell are joining forces to create an investment fund to develop technologies to promote renewable energy, as they seek an active role in the fight against global warming, sources said.

The chief executives of seven oil and gas companies — BP, Eni, Repsol, Saudi Aramco, Royal Dutch Shell, Statoil and Total — will announce details of the fund and other steps to reduce greenhouse gases in London on Friday.

The sector faces mounting pressure to take an active role in the fight against global warming, and Friday’s event will coincide with the formal entry into force of the 2015 Paris Agreement to phase out man-made greenhouse gases in the second half of the century.

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Faster transition

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By Ed Crooks: 28 October 2016

The lesson of history is clear: energy transitions take a long time. Sometimes, though, the world passes a milestone that gives a sense of how the energy system is progressing. The news this week that global power generation capacity in renewable energy is greater than in coal-fired plants looked like one of those signs that the industry really is changing.

Now, capacity is one thing and generation is another. Renewables still provided only 23 per cent of the world’s power last year, well behind coal’s 39 per cent.  But the data published by the International Energy Agency are a reminder that, in the words of BP chief economist Spencer Dale, “it’s possible that we will see forces leading to a faster transition coming from a number of different fronts”. He still expects wind, solar and biomass to be only 10 per cent of the world’s energy by 2035, though. 

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Dutch companies want next government to focus on shift to clean energy

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screen-shot-2016-10-20-at-23-00-27Dozens of Dutch companies called on the country’s next government on Tuesday to establish an independent climate authority, environment minister and national investment bank to speed up the shift to clean energy.

The rare call for more government came from 39 companies, including oil giant Royal Dutch Shell, insurer Aegon and engineering consultancy Arcadis.

They argued that future Dutch leaders must adopt a comprehensive “climate law” after the general elections next March 15 that would establish bodies to oversee policies needed to meet targets set out in the 2015 Paris climate accord.

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Survival in the harsh conditions of the oil downturn

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By Ed Crooks: October 21, 2016

The mood at the Oil and Money conference in London, the big energy event of the week, was a case of mixed emotions: cheer over signs of a near-term pick-up in the market, and concern over longer-term threats to demand.

The headlines were made on Wednesday by a clash between two of the biggest names in energy: Khalid al-Falih, energy minister of Saudi Arabia, and Rex Tillerson, chief executive of ExxonMobil. In his keynote speech, Mr al-Falih warned of the risk of “a shortage of supply” in future years because of plunging investment in oil production. Speaking minutes later, Mr Tillerson suggested he did not expect a collapse in supplies, because US shale provided “enormous spare capacity” to meet rising demand.

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Fitch: Batteries could be key disruptor to oil industry in “investor death spiral”

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Oct 18 2016, 12:45 ET | By: Carl Surran, SA News Editor

Oil producers such as ExxonMobil (NYSE:XOM), Chevron (NYSE:CVX) and Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A, RDS.B) must prepare for radical change as adoption of new technologies like electric cars could happen faster than originally anticipated, according to a new report from Fitch Ratings.

“Widespread adoption of battery-powered vehicles is a serious threat to the oil industry,” and an acceleration of the electrification of transport infrastructure could create an “investor death spiral” as investors flee the oil patch, Fitch warns.

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Shell May Snag 95% Discount on Next-Generation Ethanol Plant

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cropped-Screen-Shot-2016-09-09-at-20.58.10.jpgBy Mario Parker: 13 October 2016: Updated onOctober 14, 2016

Royal Dutch Shell Plc is set to pay $26 million for Abengoa SA’s ethanol plant that cost it and taxpayers about $500 million to build.

Shell’s so-called stalking-horse bid, which is subject to court approval, was disclosed in documents filed Wednesday with Kansas District’s U.S. Bankruptcy Court. If Abengoa receives competing bids, an auction will be held Nov. 21 for the 25 million-gallon-a-year-plant, the filings show. The bid was confirmed by Mark Kisler, managing director at Ocean Park Advisors, Abengoa’s consultant.

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