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Shell takes cautious approach to green energy transition

by Andrew Ward, Energy Editor: 1 Oct 2017

Mr van Beurden, chief executive of Shell, allows himself only the briefest self-congratulation. “All the milestones, we are either ahead or on track,” he tells the Financial Times, referring to targets set at the time of the takeover. “But you are never done in this industry because everything is always in continuous decline.” The Dutchman is talking about the relentless pressure to find new resources… FULL ARTICLE

Shell plans $1B/year toward electric vehicle charging, energy management

|By: , SA News Editor

  • Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A, RDS.B) is working on developing new energy technologies such as smart electric vehicle charging and models to reduce customers’ energy use, says Mark Gainsborough, head of the company’s New Energies division.
  • Goldman Sachs has predicted that oil demand could peak as early as 2024 due to the rollout of electric vehicles and rising fuel prices, and Shell says it plans to invest up to $1B/year through the New Energies division by the end of the decade as it seeks to ramp up involvement in technologies that are changing the market.
  • Gainsborough says Shell already has started to provide fast-charging for electric vehicles at its gasoline stations and is working on developing “smart charging” to help even out demand on the electricity grid.
  • read more

    Dyson to make electric cars from 2020

    Dyson, the engineering company best known for its vacuum cleaners and fans, plans to spend £2bn developing a “radical” electric car. The battery-powered vehicle is due to be launched in 2020. Dyson says 400 staff have been working on the secret project for the past two years at its headquarters in Malmesbury, Wiltshire.

    However, the car does not yet exist, with no prototype built, and a factory site is yet to be chosen. Sir James declined to give further details of the project. “Competition for new technology in the automotive industry is fierce and we must do everything we can to keep the specifics of our vehicle confidential,” he told staff in an email. read more

    It’s Not Just The CEO’s Car: Shell Converts Corporate Fleet To Plug-In Hybrids

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    Shell CEO Ben van Beurden made headlines worldwide when he told an interviewer in July that his next car would be an electric vehicle, but he stopped short of a full disclosure: van Beurden’s new car is part of a company-wide conversion of the corporate fleet.

    Shell Technology Director Harry Brekelmans clarified this month that he too is getting a plug-in vehicle, though it’s a hybrid:

    “Indeed Ben’s next car is electrical, but what he also says time and again is that fossil fuels will remain a part of the energy mix for decades to come, so his next car’s a hybrid, not a full EV,” Brekelmans said in appearance at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “And I know because my next car also will be a hybrid, because we’re changing the corporate fleet.” read more

    Shell plans UK’s first ‘no-petrol’ station as journey towards clean motoring continues

    Jillian Ambrose: 

    Royal Dutch Shell is preparing to open Britain’s first “no-petrol” service station in the capital next year as part of its drive towards cleaner motoring.

    The forecourt is expected to offer motorists biofuels, electric vehicle charge points and hydrogen cell refuelling instead of traditional petrol and diesel pumps. Meanwhile, the buildings are due to be powered by ­renewable energy from solar panels on the forecourt roof.

    Sources close to the Anglo-Dutch oil giant told The Telegraph that a central London site had been chosen, but the project was still at a very early stage. A spokesman for Shell declined to comment. read more

    Shell to Expand Presence in Asia and Alternative Fuel Market

    September 20, 2017, 01:35:00 PM EDT By Zacks Equity Research,

    Per Reuters, integrated oil and gas company, Royal Dutch Shell plc RDS.Aintends to increase its marketing operations in Asia region. The company’s effort to de-carbonize the energy system was reconfirmed as it targets to attain 20% of its global fuel station sales from electric vehicles recharging and fuels with a lower level of carbon by 2025.

    Expanding Asia Operations

    The oil major has 43,000 fuel stations in 80 countries and is now trying to reach the fuel markets of China and India, the two most populous countries in the world with high demand for energy. Shell is also eyeing the Indonesian fuel market. The company believes there will be continued growth in the Asian market over the next decade. read more

    Oil firm Shell planning to open its first UK electric car charging point next month

    Oil firm Shell is planning to open its first UK electric car charging point next month.

    Cars will be able to re-charge at a yet-to-be disclosed location in London. Bosses are trying to adapt as transport and other industries move away from fossil fuels. Demand for electric cars is expected to soar, with about 150m on the roads by 2040.Shell expects to open around 10 electric charging points around London by the end of the year. More will follow depending on customer demand. The firm ultimately wants 20 per cent of its retail fuel margins globally to come from non-diesel or petrol cars. In July Shell boss Ben van Beurden admitted his next car would be electric as he set out the future of the company. FULL ARTICLE read more

    Big Oil Becomes Greener With Cuts to Greenhouse Gas Pollution

    The five biggest oil companies — Exxon Mobil Corp., Royal Dutch Shell Plc, Chevron Corp., BP Plc and Total SA — collectively curbed their pollution by an average of 13 percent between 2010 and 2015, the report said. BP cut the most at 25.5 percent. Exxon, the largest emitter among listed companies, pushed it down by 14 percent. FULL ARTICLE

    Shell Sees Opportunity in Clean Hydrogen Production

    Sep 13, 2017 at 7:06AM The dream for those of us following renewable energy is to someday be able to produce 100% of the world’s energy from renewable sources. Wind and solar power could easily provide enough energy to replace every power plant and barrel of oil in the world, if only there were a cheap, easy way to store it. Batteries are expensive and chemically intensive, so hydrogen was always seen as a top-option for long-term energy storage. Royal Dutch Shell (and ITM Power) may have taken a small step toward building a hydrogen-fueled renewable future earlier this month by announcing a 10-megawatt  electrolyzer complex in Germany that will supply hydrogen to its refining plant. The hydrogen could also be used to help balance the grid or be sold to customers for their own uses. FULL ARTICLE

    Shell eyes Asia, aims to expand vehicle recharging at fuel stations

    By Ron Bousso and Dmitry Zhdannikov

    LONDON, Sept 12 (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell aims to expand marketing operations in Asia and wants 20 percent of sales from its fuel stations worldwide to come from recharging electric vehicles and low carbon fuels by 2025, as the world shifts away from crude. The Anglo-Dutch firm, with 43,000 fuel stations in 80 countries, aims to expand in China and India, as well as Mexico, where it sees fossil fuel growth in the next decade, John Abbott, the head of refining, trading and marketing, told Reuters. But he said Shell remained focused on a future of where demand for alternatives to petrol and diesel cars would rise. “Shell will be part of leading the de-carbonising of the energy system. We have to accept that is the way the world is going,” he said in an interview in London. He said Shell, the world’s top roadside fuel station operator, was “working back from the customer, which is very relevant as we go through the energy transition.” FULL ARTICLE read more

    Shell’s defence of big oil is too hopeful

    Despite growing evidence that the oil era is grinding to an ugly and disruptive halt, Shell remains optimistic. On Sept. 8, the company updated its two core strategic models – labeled Mountains and Oceans – which both come to similar conclusions about the future of crude and liquid hydrocarbon fuels. Although peak demand will happen sometime after 2030, and governments will keep intervening to cut carbon emissions, oil could still account for more than a fifth of all energy even by 2060. This matters to Shell investors. Its $50 billion takeover of BG Group in January 2016 made it the largest shipper of gas amongst its peers. However, oil remains core to its profitability. If oil has a future, it makes sense for Shell to keep investing in it. The problem is that Shell’s projections could easily be proven wrong. FULL ARTICLE read more

    General Motors, Disney, Shell and 1,200 other companies are taking steps to fight climate change, report says

    September 12 at 12:01 AM

    More than 1,200 global businesses, including U.S. companies such as Disney, Shell and General Motors, are moving to embrace a carbon price — even if President Trump isn’t, according to a new report by a Washington climate think tank. While the president has suggested that tackling climate change will undermine the economy and hamstring  businesses, chief executives have been busy voluntarily putting a price on their own carbon dioxide emissions. Pricing carbon, or assigning a dollar value per ton of carbon dioxide emissions, creates a financial incentive for companies to reduce emissions. The report published on Tuesday by the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions is the first major study of corporate carbon pricing since Trump’s election. FULL ARTICLE read more

    Shell Retail Looks to the Future With Car Charging, Clean Fuels

    Rakteem Katakey, Javier Blas: BloombergSeptember 11, 2017

    Royal Dutch Shell Plc wants 20 percent of income from its retail forecourts to come from vehicles that don’t burn diesel or gasoline, as the company anticipates an accelerating transition to clean energy over the coming decade. Shell set up its first hydrogen refueling station in the U.K. earlier this year and will install its first electric car charging point later this month, said John Abbott, the top executive of its downstream business, which includes refining, marketing, retail, trading and chemicals. By 2025, he expects these new operations supplying cleaner fuels, including natural gas, to make up a fifth of retail earnings. FULL ARTICLE read more

    Shell’s long view

    By Ed Crooks: Sunday September 10, 2017

    Royal Dutch Shell this week set out its views on the outlook over the next few decades, in presentations to investors in New York and London. Shell has been thinking deeply for decades about how to model the future. The scenarios it sets out are more explicit about the uncertainties involved than other projections, which sometimes seem to imply that we can be confident oil consumption in 2040 will be 110.8m barrels per day, or with other overly precise figures. READ MORE read more

    Global shockwaves from electric cars will be here sooner rather than later

    Sunday 10 September 2017

    Last week, Shell argued that the fuel savings from the efficiency improvements in internal combustion engines would outweigh those from electric vehicles threefold. The Anglo-Dutch company believes oil demand will not peak until the mid-2030s, despite expecting electric and plug-in hybrids cars to make up 35% of new car sales by then, up from 1% now. “To come radically earlier than the early 2030s [peak oil demand], there has to somehow be a demand change, and it’s not going to come from electric cars,” said Guy Outen, Shell’s executive vice-president of strategy and portfolio. But the company’s actions may tell a different story… FULL ARTICLE read more

    Shell criticises proposed future bans of non-electric cars

    A ban on petrol and diesel vehicles would be counterproductive if it undermines the development of more fuel-efficient engines, Royal Dutch Shell has said, while urging policymakers to let markets determine the best way to tackle climate change. Guy Outen, head of strategy for Shell, said the Anglo-Dutch oil and gas group supported those aims but said governments should not “pick winners” among green technologies.
    Shell’s argument will be seen by many as self-serving… FT ARTICLE

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