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Brexit and Brent

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Screen Shot 2016-05-30 at 15.37.19By Ed Crooks: June 24, 2016

In the market maelstrom that followed the UK’s referendum vote to leave the EU, the oil price took some collateral damage, with Brent crude dropping below $48 for the first time in a week. As the country sat up to watch the results come in, National Grid had to cope with the largest ever spike in night-time electricity demand.

The longer-term implications of Brexit for energy in the UK and Europe, like most other consequences of the decision, are highly uncertain. Politico and others sketched out some of the main issues, with news outlets taking a range of differing perspectives. Norton Rose Fulbright published an excellent primer, focusing on some of the key legal questions. BusinessGreen rounded up reaction from environmental campaigners and renewable energy businesses. Christiana Figueres, executive secretary of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, suggested before the result was known that a vote for Brexit would mean the Paris agreement on tackling global warming would “require recalibration”.

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Short term strength

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By Ed Crooks: June 17, 2016

This week has brought evidence of contrasting short-term and long-term trends in the oil market. In the short term, demand and supply are both turning out to be stronger than many had expected. The IEA revised up its forecast for oil demand growth this year in its monthly oil market report, but added that rising production would mean global oversupply could persist into 2017.

There are early indications of an upturn in activity in the US shale industry, still faint so far, but ominous for anyone relying on a sharp rebound in crude. And Iran said its oil production had reached 3.8m barrels per day, confirming the strong growth following the lifting of sanctions that was already visible last month. Iran’s oil exports have tripled since late 2015.

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Latin America must safeguard energy investors: industry leaders

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Thu Jun 16, 2016 5:48pm EDT

Latin America offers ample opportunities for the energy sector, but governments must make changes to protect investors from legal headaches, industry leaders at the World Economic Forum’s Latin America meeting in Colombia said on Thursday.

Judicial rulings regularly halt energy and mining operations in countries including Colombia, sparking worries that legal tangles would spook foreign investors as many Latin American countries battle high inflation and slowing economic growth.

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BP plc, Royal Dutch Shell: A Major Shift in Energy Industry on its Way

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By Gas By Staff WriterJun 13, 2016 at 11:34 am EST

As awareness about the hazardous effects of fossil fuels is increasing, and governments and environmentalist groups are encouraging the use of renewable energy sources, it seems as if a major change in global energy sector is on its way. Over the past few years, the global energy arena has witnessed a number of changes, as coal has lost its dominant position in the industry, while consumption of renewable energy sources has increased in power generation.

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What the future of the petrol station looks like, from renewable energies to driverless cars

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Lauren Davidson12 JUNE 2016 • 11:44PM

It’s a wonder Istvan Kapitany, executive vice-president of retail at Royal Dutch Shell, gets any work done. The view from his office on the 22nd floor of Shell’s headquarters on the South Bank looks out over some of the most impressive landmarks in the capital, including the London Eye and the Palace of Westminster.

Though not at the top level just yet – the Shell Centre has 26 floors – Kapitany has certainly climbed his way through the ranks since joining Shell in 1987 as a petrol station manager in Hungary, his home country.

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Shell says it will limit solar investment until it proves profitable

Screen Shot 2016-05-26 at 21.16.32Shell’s chief executive, Ben van Beurden, insisted the company was ‘not the opposition’ to renewables. Photograph: Bloomberg via Getty Images

Terry Macalister Energy editor: Thursday 26 May 2016 19.35 BST

Shell will avoid investing too heavily in solar or other technologies until they can make financial profits, its chief executive has said.

Ben van Beurden told a meeting of shareholders in London that the oil company was already established in windfarms, a carbon capture plant, and wanted to gradually increase its operations in clean energy.

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Shell risks dividend payments with quick switch to renewables

Screen Shot 2016-05-26 at 19.31.05Written by Reporter – 26/05/2016 6:00 am

Oil major Shell cannot switch too quickly to producing renewable energy without risking its dividend payments according to its chief executive.

More than 97% of Shell shareholders agreed at its annual meeting earlier this month to reject a resolution to invest profits from fossil fuels to become a renewable energy company.

The firm had previously said it was against the proposal.

Shell’s climate change policy has been criticised in recent months including by Dutch pension fund PGGM.

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Royal Dutch Shell plc’s very existence is at risk according to management!

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By Rupert Hargreaves – Wednesday, 25 May, 2016

Shell’s (LSE: RDSB) Chief Executive Ben van Beurden shocked the market yesterday when he revealed that Shell’s dividend payments and even its very existence are under threat if the shift to renewables takes place too fast.

The group’s CEO made these comments at Shell’s annual meeting this week as 97% of the company’s shareholders voted to reject a resolution to invest profits from fossil fuels in becoming a renewable energy company. Speaking at the meeting, Ben van Beurden said: “We cannot [transition to renewables] overnight because it could mean the end of the company.”

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Shell CEO warns renewables shift could spell end if too swift

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By REUTERSPUBLISHED: 15:23, 24 May 2016

By Ron Bousso

THE HAGUE, May 24 (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell cannot switch too quickly to producing renewable energy without risking its dividend payments and even its very existence, the oil and gas group’s chief executive warned.

Major investors, including Dutch pension fund PGGM, have criticised Shell’s climate change policy in recent months, saying it should do more to mitigate climate change risks.

However, 97 percent of Shell shareholders at its annual meeting on Tuesday rejected a resolution to invest profits from fossil fuels to become a renewable energy company. The Anglo-Dutch firm had previously said it was against the proposal.

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Shell says oil sector needs to invest trillions even within climate limits

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By REUTERS: PUBLISHED: 12:47, 24 May 2016

THE HAGUE, May 24 (Reuters) – The oil and gas industry will need to invest up to $1 trillion per year even within the limits of the U.N.-backed goal of curbing global warming to 2 degrees, Royal Dutch Shell’s chief executive said on Tuesday.

“If collectively we find a way to stay within the 2 degree (Celsius limit), we will still need significant investment in oil and gas. I am not talking about a few millions, I am talking about up to a trillion dollars every year that industry has to invest just to stay within 2 degrees in oil and gas,” Ben van Beurden said at the company’s annual shareholder meeting in The Hague.

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Climate change puts trillions of dollars of financial assets at risk: study

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OSLO | BY ALISTER DOYLEMon Apr 4, 2016 4:40pm BST

Trillions of dollars of non-bank financial assets around the world are vulnerable to the effects of global warming, according to a study on Monday that says tougher action to curb greenhouse gas emissions makes sense for investors.

Rising temperatures and the dislocation caused by related droughts, floods and heatwaves will slow global economic growth and damage the performance of stocks and bonds, according to the report, led by the London School of Economics.

“It makes financial sense to a risk-neutral investor to cut emissions, and even more so to the risk-averse,” lead author Professor Simon Dietz, an environmental economist, told Reuters.

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Lensbury Club, owned by Shell Oil, defends its opposition to Teddington and Ham Hydro renewable energy scheme

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Screen Shot 2016-04-20 at 13.50.03George Odling, Senior Reporter: 23 May 2016

A leisure club owned by Shell Oil has defended its position to block plans for a renewable energy scheme near its land.

Its decision, which has left council-tax payers footing the bill, has been blasted as “shameful” by a Teddington councillor.

Teddington’s Lensbury Club, wholly owned by the oil giant, is appealing a High Court dismissal of a review into Richmond Council’s decision to grant planning permission to the Teddington and Ham Hydro scheme.

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Royal Dutch Shell faces demand to reveal all on climate change

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Screen Shot 2016-04-20 at 13.50.03Investors say Shell has failed to fully address the impact of lower oil & gas demand due to new technologies

Coalition says Shell’s climate change management could have a bearing on executive pay

Philip Waller23 May 2016

Campaigning investors have urged Royal Dutch Shell PLC (LON:RDSB) to be more upfront with its plans to handle climate change, saying it could affect executive pay.

The Aiming for A coalition says Shell has failed to fully address the impact of reduced demand for oil and gas because of new technologies such as carbon capture and electric cars.

The group acknowledged improvements made by the company, but demanded more risk and strategy disclosure.

It said investors with assets worth US$5.05trln, including Rathbone Greenbank Investments, will provide Shell with direct feedback on progress at Shell’s AGM on Tuesday.

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Dutch pension fund PGGM critical of Shell ahead of annual meeting

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By REUTERSPUBLISHED: 18:56, 23 May 2016

AMSTERDAM, May 23 (Reuters) – Dutch pension fund PGGM, a major shareholder in Royal Dutch Shell, criticised the company’s climate change policy on Monday, a day before Shell’s annual meeting.

“We are not yet convinced Shell has sufficiently internalised the consequences of climate change in its strategy and future plans,” the fund said in a statement published on its website.

But PGGM said it would not vote in favour of a resolution put on the shareholder meeting’s agenda by activist group “Follow This” directing the oil giant to transform itself into a “sustainable energy” company.

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Shell ‘failing to plan for green future’

Screen Shot 2016-05-23 at 07.34.07A statement tabled by Aiming for A, a coalition of investors, with the backing of asset managers with $5 trillion under management, calls on Shell to do more to model the impact of reduced demand for oil and gas because of new technologies.

FULL ARTICLE (PAYWALL)

Club owned by Shell tries to block local hydropower scheme

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Damian Carrington: Sunday 22 May 2016

Shell is involved in blocking the development of a renewable energy project in a legal battle between a private club owned by the company and a community hydropower scheme on the river Thames.

The latest legal moves came just as Shell created a separate division, New Energies, to invest in renewable and low-carbon power.

The site is by the bank of the Lensbury, which was formerly a staff club for Shell employees and is now a hotel and private leisure club. The Lensbury is wholly owned by Shell and its five named directors are all “oil company executives” according to filings to Companies House, including Mike Napier, executive vice-president of external communications at Shell.

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Green really is the new black as Big Oil gets a taste for renewables

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Terry MacalisterSaturday 21 May 2016

The world’s largest oil companies have in recent weeks announced a series of “green” investments – in wind farms, electric battery storage systems and carbon capture and storage (CCS). These unexpected moves come hot on the heels of revelations by Saudi Arabia, the world’s biggest crude exporter, that it plans to sell off parts of its national oil company and diversify its economy away from petroleum.

They also come in the aftermath of a United Nations climate change agreement and before annual general meetings for Shell and Exxon Mobil this week, meetings at which shareholders will demand that more be done to tackle climate change.

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Could Royal Dutch Shell plc drop to 1,000p?

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By Prabhat Sakya – Thursday, 19 May, 2016

Change is an unavoidable part of business. Schlumpeter’s concept of “creative destruction” means that no company can afford to stand still.

For example, the photographic industry, which had always been based on film, made the move to electronic CCD technology, and people now take photos not just using digital cameras but also phones and tablets.

And the television was based on the clunky and expensive cathode ray tube (CRT) for around a century, but now LCD and LED flat screens have transformed this sector.

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Shell Looks for a Hedge Against Climate Change

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Screen Shot 2016-04-20 at 13.50.03BGeoffrey Smith: MAY 16, 2016

Royal Dutch Shell is creating a new unit specially for renewables and alternative energy, but it continues to insist that its current business of burning hydrocarbons is under no threat from global policies to mitigate climate change.

The company told investors last week that it will combine its modest operations in green energy—biofuels, wind and solar technologies—into a business unit called “new energies” under its natural gas business. It will go public with the idea in June, according to The Guardian.

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Shell creates green energy division to invest in wind power

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Terry Macalister Energy editor: Sunday 15 May 2016 16.08 BST

Shell, Europe’s largest oil company, has established a separate division, New Energies, to invest in renewable and low-carbon power.

The move emerged days after experts at Chatham House warned international oil companies they must transform their business or face a “short, brutal” end within 10 years.

Shell’s new division brings together its existing hydrogen, biofuels and electrical activities but will also be used as a base for a new drive into wind power, according to an internal announcement to company staff.

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Protesters block train tracks to 2 Washington refineries near Anacortes

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Protesters walk north along West March Point Road Saturday past the Tesoro Refinery rail yard near Anacortes. About 1,000 people walked the six-mile round trip to the tip of March Point, home to two refineries. (Scott Terrell)

By PHUONG LE: The Associated Press: May 14, 2016

Hundreds of climate activists on Saturday marched to the site of two refineries in northwest Washington state to call for a break from fossil fuels, while a smaller group continued to block railroad tracks leading to the facilities for a second day.

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Oil giants should ditch high-cost projects, thinktank says

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Terry Macalister Energy editor: Thursday 5 May 2016

These leading energy companies including Exxon Mobil should ditch high-cost projects in deep water and Canadian tar sands to concentrate on cheaper schemes that make money at low crude prices, says the report, Sense and Sensitivity, by the Carbon Tracker Initiative.

The report follows shareholder resolutions calling on oil companies to undertake “stress tests” on operations in the face of stronger carbon regulation and weakening fossil fuel demand as countries move to lower-carbon economies.

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VW and Shell try to block EU push for electric cars

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Arthur NeslenThursday 28 April 2016 

VW and Shell have united to try to block Europe’s push for electric cars and more efficient cars, saying biofuels should be at heart of efforts to green the industry instead.

The EU is planning two new fuel efficiency targets for 2025 and 2030 to help meet promises made at the Paris climate summit last December.

But executives from the two industrial giants launched a study on Wednesday night proposing greater use of biofuels, CO2 car labelling, and the EU’s emissions trading system (ETS) instead.

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Shell chairman joins new climate group involving NGOs

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Pilita Clark, Environment Correspondent: April 28, 2016

The chairman of Royal Dutch Shell, Charles Holliday, has joined executives from BHP Billiton and other big energy companies on a new body exploring whether some of the fossil fuels that businesses such as theirs produce should stay in the ground.

The chief executive of Germany’s RWE, Peter Terium, has also joined the Energy Transitions Commission, which was set up by certain energy companies, investors and non-governmental organisations…

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Shell sidesteps electric bandwagon with petrol-powered concept car

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BEIJING | BY JAKE SPRING: Fri Apr 22, 2016

Royal Dutch Shell PLC (RDSa.L) unveiled a high-efficiency petrol-burning concept car in China on Friday, to show the world’s biggest electric vehicle (EV) market that there is a lot of mileage left in conventional internal combustion engines.

Shell, one of the largest producers of automotive fuel, said it could take decades before EVs help arrest a rise in exhaust emissions, and that its concept car – which it has no intention of mass producing – demonstrates what can be done now.

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Shell CEO van Beurden sees a global carbon price as inevitable

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ABC.Net.Au: by Babs McHugh: 13 April 2016

The head of one of the world’s largest oil and gas companies says market forces will eventually result in a global price on carbon.

Royal Dutch Shell CEO Ben van Beurden made the call at the 18th International LNG Conference underway in Perth.

Mr van Beurden also championed the need for greater innovation in accessing new oil and gas reservoirs at acceptable costs, while acknowledging the tough position producers faced.

“Market conditions are pretty challenging,” he said.

“But at the same time new markets are opening up, like Thailand, Pakistan and even Poland.

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Exxon and Shell Double Down to Defeat Climate Change Legislation

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Screen Shot 2016-04-08 at 15.55.29Nika Knight, Common Dreams: April 8, 2016

The dark channels through which corporations influence legislation are notoriously hard to trace, but a new detailed report estimates that the world’s largest fossil fuel companies are spending upwards of $500 million per year to obstruct climate laws.

Published Thursday by the UK-based non-profit InfluenceMap, the report looked at two fossil fuel giants (ExxonMobil and Royal Dutch Shell) and three trade lobbying groups, discovering that all together the five companies spend $114 million dollars a year to defeat climate change legislation.

More significantly, InfluenceMap says, “Extrapolated over the entire fossil fuel and other industrial sectors beyond, it is not hard to consider that this obstructive climate policy lobbying spending may be in the order of $500m annually.”

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Sideways moves

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By Ed Crooks: April 1, 2016

Oil prices went sideways all week, with Brent crude edging up above $40 on Thursday.  Hedge funds have made record bets on rising crude prices, but everyone is still watching prospects for the scheduled meeting of Opec and non-Opec oil producers in Doha, Qatar on April 17. Qatar’s oil minister said 12 countries had so far agreed to attend, including most Opec members and Russia. Reuters provided a useful factbox on the countries that could be present at the meeting.  Ecuador is one of the Opec members trying to persuade non-member countries to join in a commitment to freeze production.

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Shell hospitality tour for EU diplomats branded ‘PR exercise’ by campaigners

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Arthur NeslenFriday 18 March 2016 

An email seen by the Guardian invites energy attaches from the EU’s 28 countries to visit the Shell technology Centre, take an ‘oil majors and oil paintings’ tour of the Van Gogh Museum, and have lunch with Shell’s president in the Netherlands.

Brook Riley, a spokesman for Friends of the Earth Europe said: “It is disgraceful to see Shell splurging profits from dirty, dangerous gas extraction on a blatant PR exercise, with the full support of the Dutch government. It is no wonder the EU’s energy plans are assuming zero improvements in efficiency or renewables. They are acting as though climate change does not exist.”

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Shell worries about climate change, but decides to continue making it worse

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Screen Shot 2016-02-17 at 08.47.47By Katie Herzog on 14 Mar 2016

Shell Oil released its 2015 annual review last week, and the most surprising thing in it may be how concerned the company is with climate change. It’s hardly what you’d expect from Big Oil, and yet the words “climate change” occur 15 times in the 228 page report. While this may seem minor, it’s a hell of a lot more than climate change is discussed by most other oil monsters (Looking at you, Exxon). Shell, unlike many oil giants, actively acknowledges and even embraces climate action — at least, on paper. “It was encouraging to see governments reach a global climate agreement in Paris in December,” the report reads. “The agreement should now encourage countries to develop policies that balance environmental concerns with enabling a decent quality of life for more people.”

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An oilman’s $7 billion refresher course in the economics of drilling and climate change

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To many analysts, it looked like Odum was pushed into leaving.

Steven Mufson March 11, 2016

Marvin Odum, president of Shell Oil, was attending a meeting of the parent company’s executive committee in Singapore when word trickled in that an exploration well drilled in Alaska’s Chukchi Sea — the crowning step in a multi-year $7 billion quest — was a dry hole.

Maybe not bone dry. In a recent interview, Odum wouldn’t say. But in the oil business glossary, a dry hole is one that can’t pay off commercially, and Shell’s hole definitely qualified. The parent company, Royal Dutch Shell, abruptly dropped any further drilling — a setback for the industry, though a relief for environmentalists.

For years, they had fought a vigorous, litigious and politically intense battle over the Chukchi. Meanwhile Shell, lured by potentially rich rewards, had overcome a couple of embarrassing rig mishaps at sea and patiently navigated the courts and the Obama administration’s permitting process. Now, geology had rendered its verdict.

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Arctic Was a Bet That Didn’t Pay Off, Departing Shell Chief Says

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Jennifer A Dlouhy: Bloomberg.com: 24 FEB 2016

The departing chief of Royal Dutch Shell Plc’s U.S. division, who presided over its failed quest to find crude in Arctic waters off Alaska, said the effort was still a point of pride because it demonstrated the company’s technical expertise.

Marvin Odum, 57, is leaving the company in a reorganization announced Wednesday. He has been with the company for 34 years and held the post atop its U.S. division, Shell Oil Co., since oil prices were at record highs.

The Arctic was “a big bet,” Odum said in a telephone interview Wednesday. 

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Shell replaces U.S. chief, splits unconventionals unit

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HOUSTON | BY KRISTEN HAYS AND RON BOUSSO: Wed Feb 24, 2016 3:42pm EST

Royal Dutch Shell’s U.S. head Marvin Odum will step down after the company abandoned a troubled drilling project offshore Alaska, and the global oil company said on Wednesday it will split up its U.S. shale and Canadian oil sands unit.

Stung by a 70 percent slide in crude prices since mid-2014, Shell this month reported its lowest annual income in more than a decade and pledged further cost saving measures.

The Anglo-Dutch company said on Wednesday its shale resources unit would become part of the global upstream business led by Andy Brown, and its Athabasca Oil Sands Project and Scotford Upgrader in Canada would be folded into the global downstream unit, headed by John Abbott.

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We’re drowning in cheap oil – yet still taxpayers prop up this toxic industry

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Screen Shot 2016-02-03 at 09.07.23George Monbiot: 3 February 2016

Those of us who predicted, during the first years of this century, an imminent peak in global oil supplies could not have been more wrong. People like the energy consultant Daniel Yergin, with whom I disputed the topic, appear to have been right: growth, he said, would continue for many years, unless governments intervened. Instead of a collapse in the supply of oil, we confront the opposite crisis: we’re drowning in the stuff.

FULL ARTICLE

Corrib Gas: Was it worth it? Yes.

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Corrib Gas: Was it worth it? Yes.

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Brendan Cafferty: 27 JAN 2016

As the gas starts to flow a member of the pro gas lobby reflects on the controversy

Who is to blame for the delay?

The gas was due ashore in 2002 at a cost of €800 million. It finally arrives at the start of 2016 at a cost of €3.5 billion-€4 billion. Planning such a huge project was, of course, protracted, with EPA and An Bord Pleanála hearings. Kevin Moore, the board’s planning inspector, did at the outset recommend that planning not be granted for the terminal at Ballinaboy, but the board of An Bord Pleanála did not agree with him – something that is not unusual.

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Climate Deal’s First Big Hurdle: The Draw of Cheap Oil

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By CLIFFORD KRAUSS and DIANE CARDWELLA version of this article appears in print on January 26, 2016, on page A1 of the New York edition

Barely a month after world leaders signed a sweeping agreement to reduce carbon emissions, the global commitment to renewable energy sources faces its first big test as the price of oil collapses.

Buoyed by low gas prices, Americans are largely eschewing electric cars in favor of lower-mileage trucks and sport utility vehicles. Yet the Obama administration has shown no signs of backing off its requirement that automakers nearly double the fuel economy of their vehicles by 2025.

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Despite Climate Concerns, OPEC Plans to Keep Pumping Oil While It Can

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By STANLEY REED and SARA HAMDANA version of this article appears in print on December 5, 2015, on page B1 of the New York edition

VIENNA — Even as United Nations climate-conference delegates met near Paris on Friday seeking ways to reduce the globe’s dependence on high-carbon fuels like oil, some of the world’s biggest petroleum producers vowed to keep pumping flat out.

The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries said on Friday that it would keep producing oil at current levels, which are estimated to exceed 31 million barrels a day.

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BP plc, Royal Dutch Shell and Others up in Arms against Coal

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By Micheal Kaufman on Dec 2, 2015

Environmentalists are winning the race against energy companies, as the world tries to adopt environmental-friendlier ways of energy generation. World leaders from over 19 countries and prominent personalities such as Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg are at the UN Climate Summit in Paris, which has been ongoing from November 30 and will continue until December 11.

Energy Companies Coming in Front

The growing concern over global warming and rising temperatures has lined up global energy companies such as Royal Dutch Shell, BP plc. (ADR) (NYSE:BP) and Total SA (ADR) (NYSE:TOT). These companies have recently teamed up to support climate change and asked authorities to consider a carbon tax.

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Royal Dutch Shell, Exxon Mobil and Glencore: Energy companies risk wasting trillions on uneconomic projects

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By Jessica Morris: 25 November 2015

Energy companies risk wasting $2.2 trillion (£1.46 trillion) on uneconomic projects over the next 10 years, according to a new report.

Think tank the Carbon Tracker Initiative’s (CTI) report how fossil fuel firms risk destroying investor returns says energy companies’ focus on fossil fuels at the expense of emerging clean technologies could put them out of kilter with environmental regulation, which will eventually dampen demand.

It comes ahead of next week’s Paris Climate Change Conference (COP21) which is expected to result in, or at least pave the way for, more climate change legislation.

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Chad Holliday on the zero-carbon economy

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Screen Shot 2015-10-05 at 14.03.31Shell’s Chairman Chad Holliday at Fortune’s Brainstorm E

Photo: Stuart Isett—Fortune Brainstorm E

Shell chairman Chad Holliday made news at Brainstorm E, held Sept. 28 and 29, by announcing the creation of a new commission to help the U.S. move to a zero-carbon economy. Why would one of the world’s largest oil and gas companies want to decarbonize? Holliday argued that the U.S. needs to find ways to provide energy to a growing global population without damaging the environment beyond repair: “Shell believes society needs to be net zero carbon by the end of this century.”

He also stressed that fossil fuels will remain part of the mix with the help of, say, carbon-capture technologies. The new Energy Transitions Commission, whose members include Statoil STOHF -1.89% , Dow Chemical DOW 0.28% , and GE GE 0.25% , will act, he said, as a trusted source of information for leaders trying to make their countries and companies more sustainable. —Brian Dumaine

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Big Oil’s Murky Climate

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Big Oil truly is facing a conundrum of biblical proportions

Liam Denning: Bloomberg.com: October 16, 2015

Big Oil is getting religion — sort of.

Ten major oil companies including Royal Dutch Shell, BP and Saudi Aramco declared on Friday that they totally get the climate change thing and would support measures aimed at preventing it. 

Yet, without committing to the most obvious measure to encourage fundamental change — namely, widespread carbon pricing — you could say the Oil and Gas Climate Initiative has taken a leaf from St. Augustine: yearning to be pure, just not quite yet.

The announcement comes ahead of December’s UN climate conference in Paris and not long after a more modern cleric, Pope Francis, took his call for greater efforts to curb carbon emissions directly to Congress.

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BP plc, Royal Dutch Shell And Others Declare Joint Action On Climate Change

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Screen Shot 2015-10-16 at 22.05.20By: Micheal Kaufman: Oct 16, 2015 

Global warming over the past few years has become a major issue. Companies around the world keep on pumping and burning record levels of conventional fossil fuels. Burning of fossil fuels leads to carbon emissions, which are highly detrimental for the environment. Activists have now have taken a stern hand regarding pollution and are urging companies to adopt safer cleaner fuels. President Barack Obama recently also stressed upon the importance of using alternatives, such as natural gas, which are safer for the environment.

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Shell to open 400 hydrogen fuelling stations in Germany by 2023

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Shell to open 400 hydrogen fuelling stations in Germany by 2023

Screen Shot 2015-09-17 at 07.55.40by Veselin ValchevWednesday, 14 Oct 2015

Royal Dutch Shell Plc (LON:RDSA) announced yesterday that it has signed a declaration of intent with its H2 Mobility Germany joint venture partners and Germany’s federal transport minister over plans to roll out 400 hydrogen fuel stations by 2023.

The pumps, three of which the venture has already opened and operates, refuel hydrogen fuel cell electric cars – environmentally neutral vehicles, which, however, have struggled to make headway into consumer markets.

“Hydrogen-fuelled electric vehicles could play a key part in a low-carbon, low-emission, future,” said Oliver Bishop, General Manager of Hydrogen at Shell. “H2 Mobility Germany shows what we can achieve through close collaboration between governments and business. The next step is for consumers to embrace this opportunity and consider buying hydrogen vehicles as they become available.”

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Will Shell-funded Energy Transitions Commission help or hinder the low carbon economy?

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Screen Shot 2015-08-13 at 11.35.25By Jessica Shankleman  |  25 Sep 2015

Will Shell-funded Energy Transitions Commission help or hinder the low carbon economy?

Oil giant Shell is backing a new organisation that is being set up to lobby governments to step up their investments in low carbon technologies, with the twin aims of boosting economic growth and tackling climate change.

But the new Energy Transitions Commission, which is due to launch on Monday with €5m to €7m of funding, has already come under fire from some green groups who fear Shell may be using the initiative to further its own aims, particularly its controversial Arctic drilling programme.

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Shell, Statoil among energy companies forging climate advice group

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Screen Shot 2015-08-27 at 14.29.46Green Business | Thu Sep 24, 2015 

Representatives from energy companies including oil heavyweights Shell and Statoil have joined forces to advise on making cleaner energy decisions, the latest push by energy firms to become more pro-active on climate issues.

Shell Chairman Chad Holliday, Statoil Vice-President Bjorn Otto Sverdrup and RWE Chief Executive Peter Terium are among a list of commissioners acting in a personal capacity to advise governments on how to change their energy markets without damaging the environment.

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Shell to advise governments on climate change!!!

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Screen Shot 2015-09-01 at 23.33.36Sep 24 2015, 11:59 ET | By: Carl Surran, SA News Editor

Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A, RDS.B), BHP Billiton (NYSE:BHP) and GE are teaming up with the McKinsey consultancy and other large companies to advise governments on how to combat global warming without weakening their economies, Financial Times reports.

The companies also are backing a $6M “energy transitions commission” to create a blueprint for a greener global economy in the next 15 years.

But the commission, due to be formally unveiled at a conference in Texas on Monday, already is under fire from some environmental groups who ask if a body supported by fossil fuel companies can offer objective guidance on global warming.

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Volatile’ oil price hard to predict, says Shell boss

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Royal Dutch Shell chief executive Ben van Beurden has told the BBC a recovery in the price of oil is hard to foresee.

“It is a very, very volatile business in terms of supply and demand. The oil price responds to very small mismatches between supply and demand,” he told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme.

The price of oil has roughly halved in the past year, to just under $50 (£32) per barrel.

Goldman Sachs predicted earlier this month it could fall as low as $20.

When asked where oil prices may go next, he told the BBC: “The honest answer to that is I don’t know.”

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Jewell says ‘Keep It in the Ground’ movement simplistic, country too reliant on fossil fuels

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The Kulluk is an Arctic drill rig owned by Royal Dutch Shell. In 2012, the rig ran aground off Sitkalidak Island near Kodiak Island. The highly publicized incident was used by drilling opponents as an example of Shell’s lack of qualifications to drill in the Arctic. (Photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Sara Francis/U.S. Coast Guard)

By Liz Ruskin, APRN-WashingtonSeptember 16, 2015

Hundreds of environmental groups are uniting under a new banner to curtail greenhouse gas emissions. It’s called: “Keep It in the Ground.”

They’re asking President Obama to stop new petroleum leases on public lands. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell rejected the idea in a meeting with reporters today.

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Shell’s big gamble: Oil wrangling at the far reaches of the Arctic frontier

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By Steven Mufson September 11

Shell Oil Co.’s president Marvin Odum made the trip on Sept. 2 from Houston to this northern-most town in the United States, a spot whose traditional name, Ukpeagvik, means “place where snowy owls are hunted.”

Odum is here hunting, too, for oil offshore and political support from Alaska Natives living in Barrow, a ramshackle town of muddy streets, littered with all-terrain vehicles and guarded by snow fences on one side and on the other a four-foot-high earthen berm to protect against high winds and seas.

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Mr. Obama’s Urgent Arctic Message

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Screen Shot 2015-09-01 at 23.33.36By THE EDITORIAL BOARD SEPT. 1, 2015

A version of this editorial appears in print on September 2, 2015, on page A24 of the New York edition

A presidential trip has enormous power to focus attention on a place and an issue, and President Obama’s trip to Alaska has been minutely choreographed with visits to glaciers, threatened Inuit villages and the like to provide a stunning and alarming context to his message on the urgent need to address climate change.

Four times in a 24-minute speech in Anchorage he declared that “we’re not acting fast enough,” a message especially true in the countdown to December’s United Nations climate conference in Paris. This will be the most ambitious effort by the world’s nations to produce an equitable deal on reducing greenhouse gases, and the United States, as the world’s second-largest emitter of carbon gases (after China), must be at the forefront of the effort.

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