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We Must Harness the Power of Carbon Capture

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Ben Van Beurden

Van Beurden is the CEO of Royal Dutch Shell

“To make investments in clean energy technologies more attractive, governments must set an effective price on CO2 emissions”

Nobody can predict the future, but it is highly likely that global energy demand will grow for decades to come. There will be more people on this planet, more people will be living in cities, and more people will be seeking a better life. “A better life” in this context does not mean a tv in every room or a new smartphone every year. It does mean adequate housing, healthcare, sanitation, and modern transport.

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Shell ties in bonuses to reinforced emissions strategy

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By Ron Bousso and Karolin Schaps | LONDON

Royal Dutch Shell plans to link part of its executive bonuses to greenhouse gas emissions and conduct more active screening of future investments to further efforts to reduce the energy group’s carbon footprint, its CEO told Reuters.

The new initiative by the Anglo-Dutch group comes in response to mounting pressure from investors to adapt to an expected flattening in oil consumption within as little as five years and international plans to phase out fossil fuels by the end of the century to combat global warming.

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Shell studying acquisitions in the green energy sector

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screen-shot-2016-11-09-at-19-58-01Written by Reporter – 30/11/2016 2:02 pm

Shell said it is studying acquisitions in the green energy sector.

It comes amid shareholder pressure to look at a strategy beyond fossil fuels.

The oil major currently has a market value of $200billion and produces 2% of the world’s oil and gas.

Chief executive Ben Van Beurden said: “The idea you can just be a very clever observer and step in when the moment is right, forget about it.

“I am convinced that in this space we will play an active role, a leafing role and we will plan acquisitions in it.”

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Shell studies green energy deals to prepare for future after oil

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By Karolin Schaps and Ron Bousso | LONDON

Royal Dutch Shell, the world’s second-biggest publicly listed oil company, is studying acquisitions in the green energy sector, its CEO told Reuters, as it bows to shareholder demands for a strategy beyond fossil fuels.

Shell, which has a market value of $200 billion, produces two percent of the world’s oil and gas but rapid technological change coupled with policies to protect the climate have kick-started a shift in energy markets that has put enormous pressure on oil companies to plan for a time after fossil fuels.

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Opec cuts neither dead nor alive

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By Ed Crooks November 28, 2016

Opec’s possible production cut is the oil market equivalent of Schrödinger’s cat: neither dead nor alive. When they met in Algiers in late September, Opec ministers agreed the need to reduce output, but left the allocation of the cuts between individual members to be finalised later. If they cannot agree on that, the deal will die. At their meeting in Vienna on Wednesday, the ministers will have to open the box, and we will find out whether or not the agreement is still breathing.

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Shell to axe 380 finance jobs in Glasgow in favour of cheaper offices overseas

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By Emily Gosden, energy editor: 16 NOVEMBER 2016 • 1:38PM

Royal Dutch Shell is to axe 380 jobs in Glasgow as it shuts its only UK finance operations office in favour of cheaper locations in Poland, India, South Africa, Malaysia and the Philippines.

The oil giant’s announcement that it plans to close its Bothwell Street office in the city as part of its cost-cutting drive brings the total number of jobs shed from its UK operations over the past 18 months to more than 1,350.

Staff in the Glasgow office, who undertake back-office administrative tasks such as processing invoices and managing travel and expenses, face “involuntary severance” as Shell moves their work to other offices in its “global Shell Business Operations network”.

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Shell jobs axed as report warns on future for oil market

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Wednesday 16 November 2016

Shell is to axe its Glasgow operation with the loss of 380 jobs as a new report warns of a “boom/bust” cycle in the oil industry.

The cuts are in response to the low oil price – which is already hurting the Scottish economy amid thousands of job cuts in North Sea production.

Shell said the decision to close its finance operation in Glasgow, which will take place by 2018, came about as it was taking “difficult choices” in order to remain competitive.

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Oil chiefs under fire over ‘pathetic’ new climate investment fund

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Emily Gosden, energy editor: 4 NOVEMBER 2016 • 7:53PM

Oil giants including BP and Shell have been pilloried by climate campaigners after disclosing their annual contributions to a much-hyped new green investment fund would be less than BP chief Bob Dudley earned last year.

Mr Dudley and Royal Dutch Shell chief executive Ben van Beurden were among industry heavyweights who appeared at an event in London to announce plans by the Oil and Gas Climate Initiative (OGCI) to invest $1bn in “innovative low emissions technologies” over the next ten years.

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Hold the champagne

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screen-shot-2016-11-03-at-14-50-16By Ed Crooks, November 4, 2016

If you are looking forward to the oil industry recovery, you shouldn’t break out the champagne just yet.

Over the past eight days, the world’s largest listed oil companies have released third quarter earnings reports. From all of them, the message was that while the worst might be over, they were still facing a long hard road ahead.

The snap reactions from the stock market were mixed: positive for  ChevronRoyal Dutch ShellTotal and ConocoPhillips; negative for ExxonMobilBPEniStatoilPetrochina and Cnooc.

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Shell, Total CEOs Question Solar in Room Full of Solar Investors

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By Anna Hirtenstein: 3 November 2016

When executives from some of the world’s biggest oil companies question the ability of solar energy to make money in a roomful of renewables investors, awkwardness ensues.

That’s what happened Thursday at the Energy for Tomorrow conference in Paris, where the chief executive officers of Royal Dutch Shell Plc and Total SA said solar power isn’t profitable.

“Growth of renewables has been remarkable but capacity of industry to make money in that segment has been remarkably absent,’’ Shell CEO Ben van Beurden said during a panel discussion. “The 10 largest solar companies collectively never paid a cent of dividends.’’

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Big Oil Slowly Adapts to a Warming World

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By CLIFFORD KRAUSSNOV. 3, 2016

In a warming world, Big Oil doesn’t look quite so big anymore.

A global glut of oil and natural gas has sent prices tumbling over the last two years, and profits are evaporating. Improving auto fuel efficiency standards threaten to depress oil consumption eventually, and fleets of electric vehicles are gradually emerging in China and a few other important markets.

Perhaps most troubling for oil companies over the long term is the goal — agreed to last December by virtually every country in the world at a climate conference in Paris — of staving off a rise in average global temperatures of more than 2 degrees Celsius above preindustrial levels.

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Oil majors join forces in climate push with renewable energy fund

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By Ron Bousso | LONDON

Top oil companies including Saudi Aramco and Shell are joining forces to create an investment fund to develop technologies to promote renewable energy, as they seek an active role in the fight against global warming, sources said.

The chief executives of seven oil and gas companies — BP, Eni, Repsol, Saudi Aramco, Royal Dutch Shell, Statoil and Total — will announce details of the fund and other steps to reduce greenhouse gases in London on Friday.

The sector faces mounting pressure to take an active role in the fight against global warming, and Friday’s event will coincide with the formal entry into force of the 2015 Paris Agreement to phase out man-made greenhouse gases in the second half of the century.

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Faster transition

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By Ed Crooks: 28 October 2016

The lesson of history is clear: energy transitions take a long time. Sometimes, though, the world passes a milestone that gives a sense of how the energy system is progressing. The news this week that global power generation capacity in renewable energy is greater than in coal-fired plants looked like one of those signs that the industry really is changing.

Now, capacity is one thing and generation is another. Renewables still provided only 23 per cent of the world’s power last year, well behind coal’s 39 per cent.  But the data published by the International Energy Agency are a reminder that, in the words of BP chief economist Spencer Dale, “it’s possible that we will see forces leading to a faster transition coming from a number of different fronts”. He still expects wind, solar and biomass to be only 10 per cent of the world’s energy by 2035, though. 

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Dutch companies want next government to focus on shift to clean energy

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screen-shot-2016-10-20-at-23-00-27Dozens of Dutch companies called on the country’s next government on Tuesday to establish an independent climate authority, environment minister and national investment bank to speed up the shift to clean energy.

The rare call for more government came from 39 companies, including oil giant Royal Dutch Shell, insurer Aegon and engineering consultancy Arcadis.

They argued that future Dutch leaders must adopt a comprehensive “climate law” after the general elections next March 15 that would establish bodies to oversee policies needed to meet targets set out in the 2015 Paris climate accord.

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Survival in the harsh conditions of the oil downturn

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By Ed Crooks: October 21, 2016

The mood at the Oil and Money conference in London, the big energy event of the week, was a case of mixed emotions: cheer over signs of a near-term pick-up in the market, and concern over longer-term threats to demand.

The headlines were made on Wednesday by a clash between two of the biggest names in energy: Khalid al-Falih, energy minister of Saudi Arabia, and Rex Tillerson, chief executive of ExxonMobil. In his keynote speech, Mr al-Falih warned of the risk of “a shortage of supply” in future years because of plunging investment in oil production. Speaking minutes later, Mr Tillerson suggested he did not expect a collapse in supplies, because US shale provided “enormous spare capacity” to meet rising demand.

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Shell Oil bids $26 million for Abengoa’s advanced biofuel plant

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By Chris Prentice | NEW YORK

Royal Dutch Shell Plc’s U.S. arm has offered more than $26 million to buy Abengoa SA’s cellulosic ethanol plant in Kansas, according to documents filed late Wednesday in bankruptcy court.

Shell’s initial bid on Abengoa’s bankrupt biofuels asset marks the oil major’s latest push into renewable fuels as the U.S. government is getting its over decade-old biofuels policy back on track following years of regulatory delays.

“This move is in line with Shell’s strategy to develop biofuels” that use sustainable feedstocks, Shell spokeswoman Natalie Mazey said in an emailed statement.

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FT Energy Source Weekly Briefing

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By Ed Crooks: October 7, 2016

Two international agreements have dominated the week’s energy news. Both have futures that are still shrouded in uncertainty, but are important landmarks if only because countries with widely diverging interests were able to come together and sign up to a shared course of action.

One was the Paris climate accord, which this week secured support from enough countries to come into force formally next month. The UN said 73 countries and the EU, accounting for more than 55 per cent of global greenhouse gas emissions, had ratified the agreement, crossing the thresholds set when the accord was adopted last December. More of the 195 countries that agreed the deal then are expected to join it formally in the coming weeks, months and years.

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Shell and BP shareholders can use votes to make firms go green, campaign group says

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Screen Shot 2016-08-04 at 14.47.05Shell and BP shareholders can use votes to make firms go green, campaign group says

Written by Mark Lammey – 29/09/2016 7:42 am

A campaign group is urging Shell and BP shareholders to use binding votes on pay plans to encourage bosses to embrace green energy, a news report said yesterday.

ShareAction said sticking with old remuneration policies that reward executives for digging for oil would lead to both companies becoming obsolete and going bankrupt, The Guardian reported.

In line with rules introduced in 2013, large companies like Shell and BP face binding shareholder votes on three-year pay policies next year, the report said.

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BP and Shell investors urged to reward bosses for backing green energy

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Screen Shot 2016-08-04 at 14.47.05BP and Shell investors urged to reward bosses for backing green energy

Shareholders should use binding votes on pay policies next year to push executives to stick to climate goals, says ShareAction

Sean FarrellThursday 29 September 2016 00.01 BST

Shell and BP’s pay plans encourage their bosses to dig for oil instead of investing in low-carbon energy and should be overhauled by shareholders, according to the campaign group ShareAction.

Investors in the oil companies should use binding votes on pay policies next year to scrap short-term targets and reward chief executives for working towards the target set in Paris last December to limit global temperature increases to 2C or less, the responsible investment group says in a report.

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No oil freeze yet

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Screen Shot 2016-06-20 at 08.25.29By Ed Crooks: September 9, 2016

“Grant me chastity and continence, but not yet,” St Augustine wrote in his Confessions, remembering his prayer as an adolescent. Opec members are taking much the same attitude to restraining their oil production.

Saudi Arabia and Russia, the world’s two largest crude producers, said on Monday they would co-operate on ways to stabilise oil prices, but stopped short of agreeing to freeze production. There will be a working group to study ways to curb price volatility, and co-operation on production curbs was held out as a possibility. But Khalid al-Falih, Saudi Arabia’s energy minister, was clearly in no hurry to make any commitments.

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Shell CEO: Red lights on path to greener energy

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After all, keeping temperatures from rising to catastrophic levels will require the world to wean itself off fossil fuels and turn to cleaner forms of energy, hardly an appealing proposition to the financial wellbeing of oil producers.

But now the leader of one of the world’s biggest oil companies is telling his peers to accept the role unapologetically.

“When it comes to some of the beliefs about the challenge of the energy transition, which may be founded on less than solid fact, our industry should not shy away from being the contrarian in the room,” Ben van Beurden, the chief executive of Royal Dutch Shell, told an oil conference in Norway recently.

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Speculation rises over Opec output freeze

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By Ed Crooks: September 2, 2016

Over the past month, the big stories in the oil market have been speculation about a possible production freeze from Opec, and the reality of rising activity in the US shale industry.

The rumours of Opec action have followed the pattern that has become wearingly familiar over the past couple of years, since the landmark meeting in November 2014 confirming that Saudi Arabia was not prepared to cut production to try to stabilise prices.

As the meeting – in this case, a gathering on the sidelines of the International Energy Forum in Algiers on September 26-28 – grows nearer, suggestions that a freeze will be discussed grow louder. Venezuela, which has the most urgent need for a higher oil price, sounds the most enthusiastic about curbing production. Other countries make supportive statements and agree to meet, without promising any action themselves.

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Shell’s Ben van Beurden calls on industry to be “contrarian in the room”

Screen Shot 2016-08-29 at 18.40.18Written by Rita Brown – 29/08/2016 12:27 pm

Shell’s chief executive Ben van Beurden called on the industry to be the “contrarian in the room” and speak the “undeniable truth” about energy’s future.

The company leader addressed the delegation at this year’s ONS, tackling climate change and the influence of the Paris climate agreement.

The chief executive opened by saying: “There is a classic story about one of the most famous Norwegians of all time, the playwright Henrik Ibsen. Lying on his sickbed, he overheard his nurse saying that he was a bit better that day.

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Oil giant Shell ‘very serious’ about pursuing offshore wind

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By Darius Snieckus in Stavanger

Monday, August 29 2016

Oil giant Shell is gearing up to “actively compete” in the global offshore wind power market, following a U-turn in its strategic direction, its chief energy adviser said today.

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Can we still be sure of Shell?

Screen Shot 2016-08-19 at 09.42.13By Kevin Godbold – Friday, 19 August, 2016

Our investing forefathers used to trot out the maxim ‘never sell Shell’. Years ago, Shell was a fast-growing business in a fast-growing market, so holding on to Shell shares indefinitely made more sense back then than it does now.   

Today, Royal Dutch Shell (LSE: RDSB) is a mature business in a mature market and its fortunes tend to ebb and flow with the undulations of wider macroeconomic cycles. Adopting a long-term buy-and-hold strategy for Shell now seems inappropriate.

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Holy Grail of energy policy in sight as battery technology smashes the old order

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AMBROSE EVANS-PRITCHARD10 AUGUST 2016 

The world’s next energy revolution is probably no more than five or ten years away. Cutting-edge research into cheap and clean forms of electricity storage is moving so fast that we may never again need to build 20th Century power plants in this country, let alone a nuclear white elephant such as Hinkley Point.

The US Energy Department is funding 75 projects developing electricity storage, mobilizing teams of scientists at Harvard, MIT, Stanford, and the elite Lawrence Livermore and Oak Ridge labs in a bid for what it calls the ‘Holy Grail’ of energy policy.

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The Future of Big Oil? At Shell, It’s Not Oil

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Screen Shot 2016-07-20 at 07.42.44The energy giant is shifting to gas as the industry adapts to climate change.

By Matthew CampbellRakteem Katakey and James Paton: 20 July 2016

At Australia’s Curtis Island, you can see Big Oil morphing into Big Gas. Just off the continent’s rugged northeastern coast lies a 667-acre liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminal owned by Royal Dutch Shell, an engineering feat of staggering complexity. Gas from more than 2,500 wells travels hundreds of miles by pipeline to the island, where it’s chilled and pumped into 10-story-high tanks before being loaded onto massive ships. “We’re more a gas company than an oil company,” says Ben van Beurden, Shell’s chief executive officer. “If you have to place bets, which we have to, I’d rather place them there.”

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Uncertainty in the oil price war

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By Ed Crooks: JULY 15. 2016

“War is the realm of uncertainty,” wrote the great Prussian military theorist Carl von Clausewitz. “Three quarters of the factors on which action in war is based are wrapped in a fog of greater or lesser uncertainty.”

That applies to price wars every much as it does to the real kind. Almost from the moment crude began falling in 2014, news outlets started running confident-sounding claims that one side or another was winning the battle often depicted as a struggle between Saudi Arabia on one side and US shale producers on the other.

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Oil Is Facing The Perfect Storm

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By Cassandra Legacy – Jul 14, 2016, 3:27 PM CDT

Since at least the end of 2014 there has been increasing uncertainty over oil prices, from whether so-called “Peak Oil” has already happened, to matters of EROI (or EROEI) values for current energy sources and for alternatives, to climate change and the phantasmatic 2oC warming limit, and the feasibility of shifting rapidly to renewables or sustainable sources of energy supply. Overall, it matters a great deal whether a reasonable time horizon to act is say 50 years, i.e. in the main the troubles that we are contemplating are taking place way past 2050, or if we are already in deep trouble and the timeframe to try and extricate ourselves is some 10 years. Answering this kind of question requires close attention to system boundary definitions and scrutinizing carefully any assumptions.

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US oil leadership questioned

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By Ed Crooks: 8 July 2016

The most eye-catching story of the week was the estimate from Rystad Energy that the US holds the world’s largest oil reserves. As the table in Rystad’s press release shows, that calculation relies heavily on “undiscovered fields” in the US that have yet be found. In terms of proved reserves in existing fields, Saudi Arabia still has more than twice as much oil as the US, according to Rystad’s estimates. John Kemp of Reuters discussed the meaning of the varying figures for Saudi Arabia’s reserves, concluding: “No-one really knows how much more oil can be recovered from beneath the Saudi desert and adjoining areas in the Gulf.”

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Shell chief Ben van Beurden: ‘You cannot expect us to act against our economic interest’

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By Emily Gosden, energy editor: 2 JULY 2016 • 2:30PM

On the last Thursday in January, the day Royal Dutch Shell’s £35bn takeover of BG Group got the final seal of approval from BG shareholders, Ben van Beurden was not planning a celebration.

Shell’s chief executive was instead preparing to get on with the detailed work of integrating the two companies: some 200 senior staff from Shell and BG had been assembled in The Hague, ready to spend Friday and the weekend working out what would happen when one of the biggest deals in history finally completed.

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Brexit and Brent

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Screen Shot 2016-05-30 at 15.37.19By Ed Crooks: June 24, 2016

In the market maelstrom that followed the UK’s referendum vote to leave the EU, the oil price took some collateral damage, with Brent crude dropping below $48 for the first time in a week. As the country sat up to watch the results come in, National Grid had to cope with the largest ever spike in night-time electricity demand.

The longer-term implications of Brexit for energy in the UK and Europe, like most other consequences of the decision, are highly uncertain. Politico and others sketched out some of the main issues, with news outlets taking a range of differing perspectives. Norton Rose Fulbright published an excellent primer, focusing on some of the key legal questions. BusinessGreen rounded up reaction from environmental campaigners and renewable energy businesses. Christiana Figueres, executive secretary of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, suggested before the result was known that a vote for Brexit would mean the Paris agreement on tackling global warming would “require recalibration”.

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Short term strength

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By Ed Crooks: June 17, 2016

This week has brought evidence of contrasting short-term and long-term trends in the oil market. In the short term, demand and supply are both turning out to be stronger than many had expected. The IEA revised up its forecast for oil demand growth this year in its monthly oil market report, but added that rising production would mean global oversupply could persist into 2017.

There are early indications of an upturn in activity in the US shale industry, still faint so far, but ominous for anyone relying on a sharp rebound in crude. And Iran said its oil production had reached 3.8m barrels per day, confirming the strong growth following the lifting of sanctions that was already visible last month. Iran’s oil exports have tripled since late 2015.

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Latin America must safeguard energy investors: industry leaders

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Thu Jun 16, 2016 5:48pm EDT

Latin America offers ample opportunities for the energy sector, but governments must make changes to protect investors from legal headaches, industry leaders at the World Economic Forum’s Latin America meeting in Colombia said on Thursday.

Judicial rulings regularly halt energy and mining operations in countries including Colombia, sparking worries that legal tangles would spook foreign investors as many Latin American countries battle high inflation and slowing economic growth.

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BP plc, Royal Dutch Shell: A Major Shift in Energy Industry on its Way

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By Gas By Staff WriterJun 13, 2016 at 11:34 am EST

As awareness about the hazardous effects of fossil fuels is increasing, and governments and environmentalist groups are encouraging the use of renewable energy sources, it seems as if a major change in global energy sector is on its way. Over the past few years, the global energy arena has witnessed a number of changes, as coal has lost its dominant position in the industry, while consumption of renewable energy sources has increased in power generation.

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What the future of the petrol station looks like, from renewable energies to driverless cars

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Lauren Davidson12 JUNE 2016 • 11:44PM

It’s a wonder Istvan Kapitany, executive vice-president of retail at Royal Dutch Shell, gets any work done. The view from his office on the 22nd floor of Shell’s headquarters on the South Bank looks out over some of the most impressive landmarks in the capital, including the London Eye and the Palace of Westminster.

Though not at the top level just yet – the Shell Centre has 26 floors – Kapitany has certainly climbed his way through the ranks since joining Shell in 1987 as a petrol station manager in Hungary, his home country.

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Shell says it will limit solar investment until it proves profitable

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Terry Macalister Energy editor: Thursday 26 May 2016 19.35 BST

Shell will avoid investing too heavily in solar or other technologies until they can make financial profits, its chief executive has said.

Ben van Beurden told a meeting of shareholders in London that the oil company was already established in windfarms, a carbon capture plant, and wanted to gradually increase its operations in clean energy.

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Shell risks dividend payments with quick switch to renewables

Screen Shot 2016-05-26 at 19.31.05Written by Reporter – 26/05/2016 6:00 am

Oil major Shell cannot switch too quickly to producing renewable energy without risking its dividend payments according to its chief executive.

More than 97% of Shell shareholders agreed at its annual meeting earlier this month to reject a resolution to invest profits from fossil fuels to become a renewable energy company.

The firm had previously said it was against the proposal.

Shell’s climate change policy has been criticised in recent months including by Dutch pension fund PGGM.

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Royal Dutch Shell plc’s very existence is at risk according to management!

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By Rupert Hargreaves – Wednesday, 25 May, 2016

Shell’s (LSE: RDSB) Chief Executive Ben van Beurden shocked the market yesterday when he revealed that Shell’s dividend payments and even its very existence are under threat if the shift to renewables takes place too fast.

The group’s CEO made these comments at Shell’s annual meeting this week as 97% of the company’s shareholders voted to reject a resolution to invest profits from fossil fuels in becoming a renewable energy company. Speaking at the meeting, Ben van Beurden said: “We cannot [transition to renewables] overnight because it could mean the end of the company.”

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Shell CEO warns renewables shift could spell end if too swift

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By REUTERSPUBLISHED: 15:23, 24 May 2016

By Ron Bousso

THE HAGUE, May 24 (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell cannot switch too quickly to producing renewable energy without risking its dividend payments and even its very existence, the oil and gas group’s chief executive warned.

Major investors, including Dutch pension fund PGGM, have criticised Shell’s climate change policy in recent months, saying it should do more to mitigate climate change risks.

However, 97 percent of Shell shareholders at its annual meeting on Tuesday rejected a resolution to invest profits from fossil fuels to become a renewable energy company. The Anglo-Dutch firm had previously said it was against the proposal.

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Shell says oil sector needs to invest trillions even within climate limits

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By REUTERS: PUBLISHED: 12:47, 24 May 2016

THE HAGUE, May 24 (Reuters) – The oil and gas industry will need to invest up to $1 trillion per year even within the limits of the U.N.-backed goal of curbing global warming to 2 degrees, Royal Dutch Shell’s chief executive said on Tuesday.

“If collectively we find a way to stay within the 2 degree (Celsius limit), we will still need significant investment in oil and gas. I am not talking about a few millions, I am talking about up to a trillion dollars every year that industry has to invest just to stay within 2 degrees in oil and gas,” Ben van Beurden said at the company’s annual shareholder meeting in The Hague.

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Climate change puts trillions of dollars of financial assets at risk: study

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OSLO | BY ALISTER DOYLEMon Apr 4, 2016 4:40pm BST

Trillions of dollars of non-bank financial assets around the world are vulnerable to the effects of global warming, according to a study on Monday that says tougher action to curb greenhouse gas emissions makes sense for investors.

Rising temperatures and the dislocation caused by related droughts, floods and heatwaves will slow global economic growth and damage the performance of stocks and bonds, according to the report, led by the London School of Economics.

“It makes financial sense to a risk-neutral investor to cut emissions, and even more so to the risk-averse,” lead author Professor Simon Dietz, an environmental economist, told Reuters.

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Lensbury Club, owned by Shell Oil, defends its opposition to Teddington and Ham Hydro renewable energy scheme

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Screen Shot 2016-04-20 at 13.50.03George Odling, Senior Reporter: 23 May 2016

A leisure club owned by Shell Oil has defended its position to block plans for a renewable energy scheme near its land.

Its decision, which has left council-tax payers footing the bill, has been blasted as “shameful” by a Teddington councillor.

Teddington’s Lensbury Club, wholly owned by the oil giant, is appealing a High Court dismissal of a review into Richmond Council’s decision to grant planning permission to the Teddington and Ham Hydro scheme.

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Royal Dutch Shell faces demand to reveal all on climate change

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Screen Shot 2016-04-20 at 13.50.03Investors say Shell has failed to fully address the impact of lower oil & gas demand due to new technologies

Coalition says Shell’s climate change management could have a bearing on executive pay

Philip Waller23 May 2016

Campaigning investors have urged Royal Dutch Shell PLC (LON:RDSB) to be more upfront with its plans to handle climate change, saying it could affect executive pay.

The Aiming for A coalition says Shell has failed to fully address the impact of reduced demand for oil and gas because of new technologies such as carbon capture and electric cars.

The group acknowledged improvements made by the company, but demanded more risk and strategy disclosure.

It said investors with assets worth US$5.05trln, including Rathbone Greenbank Investments, will provide Shell with direct feedback on progress at Shell’s AGM on Tuesday.

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Dutch pension fund PGGM critical of Shell ahead of annual meeting

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By REUTERSPUBLISHED: 18:56, 23 May 2016

AMSTERDAM, May 23 (Reuters) – Dutch pension fund PGGM, a major shareholder in Royal Dutch Shell, criticised the company’s climate change policy on Monday, a day before Shell’s annual meeting.

“We are not yet convinced Shell has sufficiently internalised the consequences of climate change in its strategy and future plans,” the fund said in a statement published on its website.

But PGGM said it would not vote in favour of a resolution put on the shareholder meeting’s agenda by activist group “Follow This” directing the oil giant to transform itself into a “sustainable energy” company.

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Shell ‘failing to plan for green future’

Screen Shot 2016-05-23 at 07.34.07A statement tabled by Aiming for A, a coalition of investors, with the backing of asset managers with $5 trillion under management, calls on Shell to do more to model the impact of reduced demand for oil and gas because of new technologies.

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Club owned by Shell tries to block local hydropower scheme

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Damian Carrington: Sunday 22 May 2016

Shell is involved in blocking the development of a renewable energy project in a legal battle between a private club owned by the company and a community hydropower scheme on the river Thames.

The latest legal moves came just as Shell created a separate division, New Energies, to invest in renewable and low-carbon power.

The site is by the bank of the Lensbury, which was formerly a staff club for Shell employees and is now a hotel and private leisure club. The Lensbury is wholly owned by Shell and its five named directors are all “oil company executives” according to filings to Companies House, including Mike Napier, executive vice-president of external communications at Shell.

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Green really is the new black as Big Oil gets a taste for renewables

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Terry MacalisterSaturday 21 May 2016

The world’s largest oil companies have in recent weeks announced a series of “green” investments – in wind farms, electric battery storage systems and carbon capture and storage (CCS). These unexpected moves come hot on the heels of revelations by Saudi Arabia, the world’s biggest crude exporter, that it plans to sell off parts of its national oil company and diversify its economy away from petroleum.

They also come in the aftermath of a United Nations climate change agreement and before annual general meetings for Shell and Exxon Mobil this week, meetings at which shareholders will demand that more be done to tackle climate change.

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Could Royal Dutch Shell plc drop to 1,000p?

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By Prabhat Sakya – Thursday, 19 May, 2016

Change is an unavoidable part of business. Schlumpeter’s concept of “creative destruction” means that no company can afford to stand still.

For example, the photographic industry, which had always been based on film, made the move to electronic CCD technology, and people now take photos not just using digital cameras but also phones and tablets.

And the television was based on the clunky and expensive cathode ray tube (CRT) for around a century, but now LCD and LED flat screens have transformed this sector.

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Shell Looks for a Hedge Against Climate Change

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Screen Shot 2016-04-20 at 13.50.03BGeoffrey Smith: MAY 16, 2016

Royal Dutch Shell is creating a new unit specially for renewables and alternative energy, but it continues to insist that its current business of burning hydrocarbons is under no threat from global policies to mitigate climate change.

The company told investors last week that it will combine its modest operations in green energy—biofuels, wind and solar technologies—into a business unit called “new energies” under its natural gas business. It will go public with the idea in June, according to The Guardian.

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