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AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL SAYS SHELL UNDERSTOOD THE RISKS OF CALLING FOR MILITARY INTERVENTION IN THE NIGER DELTA

The police officers, using guns and grenades, killed 80 people…

Extract from pages 8 & 9 of an Amnesty International document headed: “A CRIMINAL ENTERPRISE? SHELL’S INVOLVEMENT IN HUMAN RIGHTS VIOLATIONS IN NIGERIA IN THE 1990s”

Under Executive Summary.

SHELL UNDERSTOOD THE RISKS OF CALLING FOR MILITARY INTERVENTION

There is irrefutable evidence that Shell knew that the Nigerian security forces committed grave violations when they were deployed to address community protests. The company knew the risks since at least 1990, when Shell called for the assistance of a paramilitary police unit to deal with peaceful protestors at Umuechem village, also in the Niger Delta. According to an official enquiry, the police descended on the community, “like an invading army that had vowed to take the last drop of the enemy’s blood.” The police officers, using guns and grenades, killed 80 people. read more

SHELL AND THE NIGERIAN GOV. HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES IN OGONILAND 1993-6

Extract from pages 7 & 8 of an Amnesty International document headed: “A CRIMINAL ENTERPRISE? SHELL’S INVOLVEMENT IN HUMAN RIGHTS VIOLATIONS IN NIGERIA IN THE 1990s”

Under Executive Summary.

SHELL AND THE NIGERIAN GOVERNMENT: HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES IN OGONILAND 1993-6

HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES IN OGONILAND 1993-6

In January 1993, Shell withdrew from Ogoniland citing security concerns for its staff. These concerns had some basis: Shell staff had been subjected to intimidation and physical attacks on several occasions. Shell sought to blame these attacks on MOSOP, but MOSOP and Ken Saro-Wiwa had always underlined the peaceful nature of the movement and had actively tried to stop those in the community who engaged in violence. read more

SHELL KNEW MOSOP HAD A LEGITIMATE GRIEVANCE SAYS AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL

Extract from pages 6 & 7 of an Amnesty International document headed: “A CRIMINAL ENTERPRISE? SHELL’S INVOLVEMENT IN HUMAN RIGHTS VIOLATIONS IN NIGERIA IN THE 1990s”

Under Executive Summary.

SHELL AND THE NIGERIAN GOVERNMENT: “SHELL KNEW MOSOP HAD A LEGITIMATE GRIEVANCE”

SHELL KNEW MOSOP HAD A LEGITIMATE GRIEVANCE

While framing the Ogoni protests as a largely economic problem, Shell downplayed the community’s concerns about the environment and other issues.

In public statements Shell denied that its operations had caused environmental problems. This was completely false. Internal documents reveal that senior staff were highly concerned about the poor state of Shell’s ageing, inadequately maintained and leaky pipelines. In November 1994, the head of environmental studies for Shell Nigeria, Bopp Van Dessel, resigned over the issue, saying that he felt unable to defend the company’s environmental record “without losing his personal integrity.” Van Dessel went public with these allegations in a TV interview in 1996 stating: read more

SHELL AND THE NIGERIAN GOVERNMENT: “INEXTRICABLY LINKED” SAYS AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL

Extract from page 6 of an Amnesty International document headed: “A CRIMINAL ENTERPRISE? SHELL’S INVOLVEMENT IN HUMAN RIGHTS VIOLATIONS IN NIGERIA IN THE 1990s”

Under Executive Summary.

SHELL AND THE NIGERIAN GOVERNMENT: “INEXTRICABLY LINKED”

In the 1990s Shell was the single most important company in Nigeria and in 1995 pumped almost one million barrels of crude oil a day, roughly half of Nigeria’s total daily oil production. Nigeria’s oil exports made up 95.7% of the country’s foreign earnings so were vital to the economy.

The country and the company had a shared interest in ensuring that the oil kept owing. Shell and the government were business partners, running the highly pro table Nigerian oil felds as a joint venture. The two entities were in constant contact. As the chairperson of Shell Nigeria from 1994-7, Brian Anderson, conceded, “The government and the oil industry are inextricably entangled.” read more

Shell director calls himself ‘proud’ of controversial Nigerian operations at Cambridge talk

Footage has emerged of a Shell director saying that he was “fundamentally proud” of the company’s actions in Nigeria, only a week before Amnesty International accused the company of being closely involved with human rights abuses in the country.

The remarks were made by Andrew Brown, a member of the Royal Dutch Shell executive committee, at the Shell annual lecture, an event affiliated with the University, at Emmanuel College on the 20th November.

When asked by host Stephen Sackur, a former BBC foreign correspondent, whether he was proud of what Shell had “done over the years in Nigeria”, Brown replied that “I am, I’m fundamentally proud of what happened in Nigeria”.

The comments are likely to raise eyebrows given the controversial nature of Shell’s involvement in Nigeria. On November 28th, Amnesty International called on the British, Dutch, and Nigerian governments to investigate, with a view to prosecution, the role of Shell in human rights abuses in the 1990s. read more

U.S. oil majors fall behind on climate, European lead

Major European oil companies are making major efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to fight climate change. American majors are dragging their behinds.

Royal Dutch Shell pledged Tuesday to slash carbon emission by 50 percent and boost investment in clean, renewable energy. CEO Ben van Beurden promised to spend at least $2 billion on on wind power, biofuels and electric cars, about the same amount it will spend on shale oil.

“It is making sure that the products within society have an overall lower carbon footprint,” Beurden told investors, according to the Guardian newspaper. “That is the long-term way of making sure our business remains a relevant business in the face of the energy transition.” read more

Amnesty wants probe into Shell’s alleged role in 1990s Nigeria violence

Esther Kiobel, the widow of one of the nine Ogoni activists

Reporting by Libby George; Editing by Edmund Blair: NOVEMBER 28, 2017

LONDON/LAGOS (Reuters) – Amnesty International has called for a criminal investigation into the alleged role of Royal Dutch Shell in human rights abuses in Nigeria’s oil-rich Ogoniland in the 1990s, accusations the Anglo-Dutch oil company has denied. The rights group urged the British, Dutch and Nigerian governments carry out probes in a report that it said included evidence showing Shell’s involvement in suppression of protesters by the military government in the 1990s. Shell Petroleum Development Company of Nigeria Limited (SPDC) said the allegations were “false and without merit”. FULL ARTICLE read more

Dutch Public Prosecution Service looks at Amnesty dossier on Shell Nigeria

ENGLISH TRANSLATION (GOOGLE TRANSLATE) OF A DUTCH ARTICLE PUBLISHED BY NU.nl

Published: 28 November 2017 18:44 Last update: November 28, 2017 9:45

The Public Prosecution Service (OM) will look at the file Amnesty International has made about the role of Shell in Nigeria. According to the human rights organization, Shell was actively involved in violence against the Ogoni population in Nigeria. Amnesty International has called on Nigeria, the United Kingdom and the Netherlands to conduct a criminal investigation into the role of Shell. “We are going to study the file very seriously and if we see a reason we start an investigation”, a spokesperson for the Public Prosecution Service (OM) reacts. According to the human rights organization, Shell’s internal documents and testimonies show that the oil company repeatedly encouraged the Nigerian army to take action against protests from the Ogoni. Residents of Ogoniland revolted after oil spills from Shell had caused enormous environmental damage. According to Amnesty, Shell asked a paramilitary police unit in 1990 for ‘protection’ against protests on which agents attacked the village of Umuechem and killed at least eighty people. In later years, requests for assistance from the company also led to bloodshed. The Shell summit would have been aware of this violence, but it did not stop the requests, Amnesty claims, which says to have internal documents that prove it.

Declaration

If the Public Prosecution Service does not institute an investigation, Amnesty will file a report. The human rights organization is currently working on a criminal file, which in due course can be given to the Public Prosecution Service. When that dossier is ready, the organization does not know.

Shell has always denied having been involved in human rights violations. “Shell has not encouraged or encouraged violence. We believe that the facts will clearly show that Shell was not responsible for those tragic events. read more

Amnesty International demands criminal investigation of Shell’s complicity in murder

Esther Kiobel poses with a picture of her late husband Dr. Barinem Kiobel one of nine men executed by Nigeria’s military government after a peaceful uprising in 1995 against Shell’s widespread pollution in Ogoniland. Photograph: Amnesty International

Multiple news stories: Amnesty International demand criminal investigation of Shell complicity in Nigerian murder, torture and rape

The Guardian: Amnesty seeks criminal inquiry into Shell over alleged complicity in murder and torture in Nigeria

Extract: Amnesty International is calling for a criminal investigation into the oil giant Shell regarding allegations it was complicit in human rights abuses carried out by the Nigerian military. Amnesty is urging the UK, Nigeria and the Netherlands to consider a criminal case against Shell in light of evidence it claims amounts to “complicity in murder, rape and torture” – allegations Shell strongly denies. read more

Investigate Shell for complicity in murder, rape and torture says Amnesty International

Massive cache of internal documents and other evidence points to Shell’s complicity in horrific crimes committed by the Nigerian military in the 1990s

–      New Amnesty International report calls for a criminal investigation

Amnesty International is calling on Nigeria, the UK and the Netherlands to launch investigations into Anglo-Dutch oil giant Shell, over its role in a swathe of horrific crimes committed by the Nigerian military government in the oil-producing Ogoniland region in the 1990s.

The organization has released a ground-breaking review of thousands of pages of internal company documents and witness statements, as well as Amnesty International’s own archive from the period.

The Nigerian military’s campaign to silence the Ogoni people’s protests against Shell’s pollution led to widespread and serious human rights violations, many of which also amounted to criminal offences. read more

SHELL EVADING RESPONSIBILITY IN NIGERIA

My name is Esher Kiobel. I would like to tell you about my epic fight with the Goliath oil company Royal Dutch Shell, whose army of lawyers have battled since 2001 to prevent my case against the evil company from being heard in court. I hold Shell responsible for crimes against my family, including the execution of my distinguished husband Dr. Barinem Kiobel who was hanged along with fellow Ogoni, collectively known as the Ogoni 9. Ken Saro-Wiwa, a winner of the Goldman Environmental Prize, was also one of the Ogoni 9. read more

Shell’s Actions in Ogoniland

The Movement for the Survival of the Ogoni People (MOSOP) has described the actions of Shell in Ogoniland as an embarrassment to the civilized world and an onslaught against freedom and dignity of the human person. Publicity Secretary of MOSOP, Fegalo Nsuke made this assertion in Port Harcourt at a meeting with MOSOP Coordinators and Leaders on Tuesday.

Nsuke said Shell has acted very irresponsibly in Ogoniland, sponsoring terror against the Ogoni people and aiding Nigerian soldiers to suppress the Ogoni agitation against human rights abuses. read more

Kiobel’s fight for Shell discovery: Lawyer skirmishes on eve of U.S. Court of Appeals hearing

Esther Kiobel has been fighting for more than a decade to obtain justice for the murder of her husband Dr. Barinem Kiobel and crimes committed against her, for which she holds Shell responsible. Shell supported and financed the corrupt Abacha regime in Nigeria.

By John Donovan

Shell’s U.S. lawyers Cravath, Swaine & Moore, appealed against a decision by a U.S. federal judge that Cravath should hand over for use in Dutch litigation against Shell, more than 100,000 items of Shell internal discovery documents stored by Cravath in a secure warehouse located in the USA.

I have routinely published available appeal court documents that would otherwise be hidden behind a pay wall. The documents below were filed with the court in the days just before the appeal court hearing by various parties involved, including Washington DC lawyers Hogan Lovells representing Cravath, and EarthRights International acting for Esther Kiobel. read more

In memory of Dr. Barinem Nubari Kiobel

By John Donovan

It will shortly be five years since Esther Kiobel first sought my help in her fight to hold Shell accountable for complicity in the murder of her husband Dr. Barinem Nubari Kiobel – a member of the “Ogoni 9” executed in Nigeria by the dreaded Abacha regime. Esther correctly anticipated that Shell would succeed in blocking her attempt to use the US courts to seek justice. Shell recruited the UK and Dutch governments to help thwart the US litigation on judicial territoriality grounds. The merits of her claim were never considered.  read more

SHELL STILL TRYING TO GET AWAY WITH MURDER – LITERALLY

Thurgood Marshall U.S. Courthouse, New York, New York

An important decision day for Esther Kiobel in the above U.S. Courthouse tomorrow, Tuesday 12 Sept 2017 in her epic attempt to bring Shell to Justice for complicity in the murder of her husband Dr. Barinem Kiobel, one of the  Ogoni Nine. She is seeking more than 100,000 Shell discovery documents stored in a secure US warehouse. 

“Who doesn’t love a good discovery fight? And this one involving Cravath, Swaine & Moore is a doozy, with ramifications that extend literally across the planet.”

By John Donovan

The text shown in red is an extract from an article by Jenna Greene from The Litigation Daily published in the US yesterday under the headline “Cravath in the Crosshairs”.

Cravath, Swaine & Moore are Shell’s lawyers. In 2013 they managed to torpedo on jurisdiction grounds a 2002 US lawsuit against Shell led by Esther Kiobel. After over a decade of litigation to stop the case from being heard, Cravath won a US Supreme Court decision in 2013 on that important point of law, without her charges against Shell  ever being considered. read more

Shell Withholds 100,000 Documents Critical To Ogoni Nine Case

BY PUNCH NEWSPAPERSEP 08, 2017

The oil giant, Shell, is refusing to hand over more than 100,000 internal documents on the arrest, detention, and execution of nine Ogoni men in the 1990s, Amnesty International has said. The execution of the “Ogoni Nine”,  including the renowned writer Ken Saro-Wiwa, by the government in 1995 sparked global outrage. Others executed along with Saro-Wiwa were Saturday Dobee, Nordu Eawo, Daniel Gbooko, Paul Levera, Felix Nuate, Baribor Bera, Barinem Kiobel, and John Kpuine. In a statement on Friday, a Senior Director of Research at Amnesty International, Audrey Gaughran, said Shell has gone to extraordinary lengths to withhold information vital to the case. He alleged that the oil giant may have “skeletons in its cupboard” and should not be allowed to hide behind expensive legal teams to avoid facing justice. “Shell has gone to extraordinary lengths to withhold this critical information. Because the documents in question are so old, it is highly unlikely that there are legitimate business reasons for keeping them confidential. So what does Shell have to hide?” FULL ARTICLE read more

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