Royal Dutch Shell Plc  .com Rotating Header Image

Posts under ‘Climate Change’

Not dead yet

screen-shot-2016-11-12-at-10-34-30

screen-shot-2016-11-19-at-15-54-51

screen-shot-2016-11-08-at-16-03-35

By Ed Crooks: November 19, 2016

The last rites have been read over the Age of Oil a few times recently, but this week the International Energy Agency suggested there was still plenty of life left in it yet.

In its 2016 World Energy Outlook, the IEA argued that even if the Paris climate agreement were fully implemented, demand for oil would keep rising until at least 2040.

The message was reassuring for oil producers worried that “peak demand” might condemn them to stagnation or decline, or even put them out of business. There was colder comfort, however, in a warning from Wood Mackenzie that big oil companies risked being left behind in the transition to low-carbon energy.

read more

Shell to axe 380 finance jobs in Glasgow in favour of cheaper offices overseas

screen-shot-2016-11-16-at-15-49-52

By Emily Gosden, energy editor: 16 NOVEMBER 2016 • 1:38PM

Royal Dutch Shell is to axe 380 jobs in Glasgow as it shuts its only UK finance operations office in favour of cheaper locations in Poland, India, South Africa, Malaysia and the Philippines.

The oil giant’s announcement that it plans to close its Bothwell Street office in the city as part of its cost-cutting drive brings the total number of jobs shed from its UK operations over the past 18 months to more than 1,350.

Staff in the Glasgow office, who undertake back-office administrative tasks such as processing invoices and managing travel and expenses, face “involuntary severance” as Shell moves their work to other offices in its “global Shell Business Operations network”.

read more

Trump’s victory could hurt Royal Dutch Shell plc’s future

screen-shot-2016-10-07-at-09-05-51

screen-shot-2016-11-14-at-10-41-57

screen-shot-2016-10-06-at-13-11-55

By The Motley Fool  Nov 14, 2016

Donald Trump’s views on climate change may provide a boost to oil production in the US. He stated in his campaign that the US was being disadvantaged by rules and regulations aimed to prevent (or at least slow down) climate change. This could signal a more positive attitude from the US government towards oil and gas companies over the medium term.

Although there’s no certainty that Trump will follow through on his campaign policies when he becomes President, it seems likely that he’ll be less positive about battling the effects of climate change than Barack Obama. This could be bad news for Shell(LSE: RDSB).

read more

Trump energised

screen-shot-2016-11-12-at-10-43-03

By Ed Crooks, November 11, 2016

“Between a battle lost and a battle won, the distance is immense and there stand empires,” said Napoleon. The same is true of elections.

Donald Trump may have come slightly behind Hillary Clinton in the popular vote for the presidency, but his convincing victory in the electoral college will give him the ability to reshape the energy industry in the US and around the world.

His hand will be strengthened by Republican control of Congress. Parts of Mr Trump’s agenda will face resistance in Congress, but his energy policy is unlikely to be one of those areas. His support for oil, gas and coal, his commitment to deregulation and his rejection of climate policy are all well aligned with mainstream Republican thinking.

read more

Oil chiefs under fire over ‘pathetic’ new climate investment fund

Screen Shot 2016-09-07 at 14.28.11

screen-shot-2016-11-04-at-20-09-08

screen-shot-2016-11-04-at-20-26-48

Emily Gosden, energy editor: 4 NOVEMBER 2016 • 7:53PM

Oil giants including BP and Shell have been pilloried by climate campaigners after disclosing their annual contributions to a much-hyped new green investment fund would be less than BP chief Bob Dudley earned last year.

Mr Dudley and Royal Dutch Shell chief executive Ben van Beurden were among industry heavyweights who appeared at an event in London to announce plans by the Oil and Gas Climate Initiative (OGCI) to invest $1bn in “innovative low emissions technologies” over the next ten years.

read more

Hold the champagne

Screen Shot 2016-09-02 at 12.53.40

screen-shot-2016-11-04-at-19-29-23

screen-shot-2016-11-03-at-14-50-16By Ed Crooks, November 4, 2016

If you are looking forward to the oil industry recovery, you shouldn’t break out the champagne just yet.

Over the past eight days, the world’s largest listed oil companies have released third quarter earnings reports. From all of them, the message was that while the worst might be over, they were still facing a long hard road ahead.

The snap reactions from the stock market were mixed: positive for  ChevronRoyal Dutch ShellTotal and ConocoPhillips; negative for ExxonMobilBPEniStatoilPetrochina and Cnooc.

read more

Oil majors pledge $1 billion for technologies to fight climate change

screen-shot-2016-10-31-at-19-27-20

screen-shot-2016-11-04-at-14-31-11

screen-shot-2016-11-04-at-14-32-40

By Karolin Schaps and Ron Bousso | LONDON

Some of the world’s biggest oil companies, including Saudi Aramco and Royal Dutch Shell, pledged on Friday to invest $1 billion to help fight climate change as a global deal to wean the world off fossil fuels came into force.

The Oil and Gas Climate Initiative (OGCI), which also includes Total, BP, Eni, Repsol, Statoil, CNPC, Pemex [PEMX.UL] and Reliance Industries, has established the Climate Investments fund which will help develop carbon-reducing technologies over the coming ten years.

read more

Shell, Total CEOs Question Solar in Room Full of Solar Investors

screen-shot-2016-10-13-at-10-39-14

screen-shot-2016-11-04-at-09-52-10

screen-shot-2016-10-16-at-09-04-40

By Anna Hirtenstein: 3 November 2016

When executives from some of the world’s biggest oil companies question the ability of solar energy to make money in a roomful of renewables investors, awkwardness ensues.

That’s what happened Thursday at the Energy for Tomorrow conference in Paris, where the chief executive officers of Royal Dutch Shell Plc and Total SA said solar power isn’t profitable.

“Growth of renewables has been remarkable but capacity of industry to make money in that segment has been remarkably absent,’’ Shell CEO Ben van Beurden said during a panel discussion. “The 10 largest solar companies collectively never paid a cent of dividends.’’

read more

Big Oil Slowly Adapts to a Warming World

screen-shot-2016-11-03-at-12-09-13screen-shot-2016-11-03-at-12-06-52

By CLIFFORD KRAUSSNOV. 3, 2016

In a warming world, Big Oil doesn’t look quite so big anymore.

A global glut of oil and natural gas has sent prices tumbling over the last two years, and profits are evaporating. Improving auto fuel efficiency standards threaten to depress oil consumption eventually, and fleets of electric vehicles are gradually emerging in China and a few other important markets.

Perhaps most troubling for oil companies over the long term is the goal — agreed to last December by virtually every country in the world at a climate conference in Paris — of staving off a rise in average global temperatures of more than 2 degrees Celsius above preindustrial levels.

read more

Oil majors join forces in climate push with renewable energy fund

screen-shot-2016-10-31-at-19-27-20

screen-shot-2016-11-03-at-11-44-22

screen-shot-2016-11-03-at-11-57-46

By Ron Bousso | LONDON

Top oil companies including Saudi Aramco and Shell are joining forces to create an investment fund to develop technologies to promote renewable energy, as they seek an active role in the fight against global warming, sources said.

The chief executives of seven oil and gas companies — BP, Eni, Repsol, Saudi Aramco, Royal Dutch Shell, Statoil and Total — will announce details of the fund and other steps to reduce greenhouse gases in London on Friday.

The sector faces mounting pressure to take an active role in the fight against global warming, and Friday’s event will coincide with the formal entry into force of the 2015 Paris Agreement to phase out man-made greenhouse gases in the second half of the century.

read more

Dutch companies want next government to focus on shift to clean energy

screen-shot-2016-10-16-at-20-57-40

screen-shot-2016-10-25-at-17-00-59

screen-shot-2016-10-20-at-23-00-27Dozens of Dutch companies called on the country’s next government on Tuesday to establish an independent climate authority, environment minister and national investment bank to speed up the shift to clean energy.

The rare call for more government came from 39 companies, including oil giant Royal Dutch Shell, insurer Aegon and engineering consultancy Arcadis.

They argued that future Dutch leaders must adopt a comprehensive “climate law” after the general elections next March 15 that would establish bodies to oversee policies needed to meet targets set out in the 2015 Paris climate accord.

read more

Survival in the harsh conditions of the oil downturn

screen-shot-2016-10-21-at-16-56-28

By Ed Crooks: October 21, 2016

The mood at the Oil and Money conference in London, the big energy event of the week, was a case of mixed emotions: cheer over signs of a near-term pick-up in the market, and concern over longer-term threats to demand.

The headlines were made on Wednesday by a clash between two of the biggest names in energy: Khalid al-Falih, energy minister of Saudi Arabia, and Rex Tillerson, chief executive of ExxonMobil. In his keynote speech, Mr al-Falih warned of the risk of “a shortage of supply” in future years because of plunging investment in oil production. Speaking minutes later, Mr Tillerson suggested he did not expect a collapse in supplies, because US shale provided “enormous spare capacity” to meet rising demand.

read more

%d bloggers like this: