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Posts under ‘Climate Change’

Big Oil Becomes Greener With Cuts to Greenhouse Gas Pollution

The five biggest oil companies — Exxon Mobil Corp., Royal Dutch Shell Plc, Chevron Corp., BP Plc and Total SA — collectively curbed their pollution by an average of 13 percent between 2010 and 2015, the report said. BP cut the most at 25.5 percent. Exxon, the largest emitter among listed companies, pushed it down by 14 percent. FULL ARTICLE

Shell Sees Opportunity in Clean Hydrogen Production

Sep 13, 2017 at 7:06AM The dream for those of us following renewable energy is to someday be able to produce 100% of the world’s energy from renewable sources. Wind and solar power could easily provide enough energy to replace every power plant and barrel of oil in the world, if only there were a cheap, easy way to store it. Batteries are expensive and chemically intensive, so hydrogen was always seen as a top-option for long-term energy storage. Royal Dutch Shell (and ITM Power) may have taken a small step toward building a hydrogen-fueled renewable future earlier this month by announcing a 10-megawatt  electrolyzer complex in Germany that will supply hydrogen to its refining plant. The hydrogen could also be used to help balance the grid or be sold to customers for their own uses. FULL ARTICLE

Lawsuit: Shell Knew Climate Risks in Providence and Ignored Them

By Karen Savage: September 12, 2017

The oil giant Shell has known for decades about the dangers of not protecting its facilities—and in turn its neighbors and the environment—from the growing risks associated with climate change, alleges a lawsuit filed by the Conservative Law Foundation, a Boston-based environmental law and advocacy group that operates across New England. And one piece of evidence comes from Shell itself, which produced a 30-minute video in 1991 that includes ominous predictions and a dire warning. FULL ARTICLE read more

General Motors, Disney, Shell and 1,200 other companies are taking steps to fight climate change, report says

September 12 at 12:01 AM

More than 1,200 global businesses, including U.S. companies such as Disney, Shell and General Motors, are moving to embrace a carbon price — even if President Trump isn’t, according to a new report by a Washington climate think tank. While the president has suggested that tackling climate change will undermine the economy and hamstring  businesses, chief executives have been busy voluntarily putting a price on their own carbon dioxide emissions. Pricing carbon, or assigning a dollar value per ton of carbon dioxide emissions, creates a financial incentive for companies to reduce emissions. The report published on Tuesday by the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions is the first major study of corporate carbon pricing since Trump’s election. FULL ARTICLE read more

Shell Retail Looks to the Future With Car Charging, Clean Fuels

Rakteem Katakey, Javier Blas: BloombergSeptember 11, 2017

Royal Dutch Shell Plc wants 20 percent of income from its retail forecourts to come from vehicles that don’t burn diesel or gasoline, as the company anticipates an accelerating transition to clean energy over the coming decade. Shell set up its first hydrogen refueling station in the U.K. earlier this year and will install its first electric car charging point later this month, said John Abbott, the top executive of its downstream business, which includes refining, marketing, retail, trading and chemicals. By 2025, he expects these new operations supplying cleaner fuels, including natural gas, to make up a fifth of retail earnings. FULL ARTICLE read more

Shell’s long view

By Ed Crooks: Sunday September 10, 2017

Royal Dutch Shell this week set out its views on the outlook over the next few decades, in presentations to investors in New York and London. Shell has been thinking deeply for decades about how to model the future. The scenarios it sets out are more explicit about the uncertainties involved than other projections, which sometimes seem to imply that we can be confident oil consumption in 2040 will be 110.8m barrels per day, or with other overly precise figures. READ MORE read more

Global shockwaves from electric cars will be here sooner rather than later

Sunday 10 September 2017

Last week, Shell argued that the fuel savings from the efficiency improvements in internal combustion engines would outweigh those from electric vehicles threefold. The Anglo-Dutch company believes oil demand will not peak until the mid-2030s, despite expecting electric and plug-in hybrids cars to make up 35% of new car sales by then, up from 1% now. “To come radically earlier than the early 2030s [peak oil demand], there has to somehow be a demand change, and it’s not going to come from electric cars,” said Guy Outen, Shell’s executive vice-president of strategy and portfolio. But the company’s actions may tell a different story… FULL ARTICLE read more

Shell criticises proposed future bans of non-electric cars

A ban on petrol and diesel vehicles would be counterproductive if it undermines the development of more fuel-efficient engines, Royal Dutch Shell has said, while urging policymakers to let markets determine the best way to tackle climate change. Guy Outen, head of strategy for Shell, said the Anglo-Dutch oil and gas group supported those aims but said governments should not “pick winners” among green technologies.
Shell’s argument will be seen by many as self-serving… FT ARTICLE

Shell’s Ben van Beurden: Oil vs Uber in the battle of reputations

Written by

But it wasn’t oil price, or strategy that landed him prime time interviews. Instead, it was the comment that his next car would be electric. “It wasn’t a planned remark, it just came out,” he said. “But it shows how charismatic renewables and electricity is at the moment, much more charismatic than gas and definitely much more charismatic than oil.” A perception that oil and gas have a shrinking role to play is one the industry needs to address head-on. “If you really want to be charismatic about what needs to happen in a big way you would focus on gas,” he said. And that includes an education around renewables. FULL ARTICLE read more

INTERVIEW-Electric cars and renewables not enough to meet Paris climate goal – consultant

By Karolin Schaps

ARNHEM, The Netherlands, Sept 5 (Reuters) – The cost of electric vehicles (EVs) will fall to match those running on combustion engines by 2022, a key trigger that will mean by 2035 half of all passenger vehicles sold globally will be electric, according to the head of a top energy consultancy. But this expected exponential rise in cleaner vehicles, coupled with booming renewable energy production, will not be enough to meet the Paris Agreement goal of limiting climate warming, Ditlev Engel, chief executive of DNV GL’s energy consulting business, told Reuters in an interview. FULL ARTICLE read more

Big Oil to be usurped by gas in little more than a decade, experts warn

Jillian Ambrose: 

THE dominance of Big Oil will be usurped in less than two decades by the dawn of a golden age for natural gas lasting at least until the middle of the century. One of the world’s biggest risk assurance experts in the global energy ­industry has predicted that gas will emerge as the world’s most important source of energy by the mid 2030s ­after a slow descent for oil which will peak within ten years and the ongoing decline of coal. The fresh findings are reassuring for investors in oil supermajors BP and Royal Dutch Shell which have both ­begun to shift their portfolios towards gas exploration and production in the wake of the global oil price crash. FULL ARTICLE read more

Is it game over for BP plc and Royal Dutch Shell plc?

It’s for this reason that I don’t believe the end is nigh for fossil fuels. That really matters to companies like  and Royal Dutch Shell. In fact I’ve been listening to experts harping on about the end of our reliance on fossil fuels ever since I was a child. And believe me, that was a very long time ago.

Think again

So for those of you who think that the big oil firms are doomed, I would say, think again. Oil has been described as the lifeblood of the global economy on many occasions, with the invasion of Iraq and bombing of Libya possibly serving as proof that we are willing to do just about anything to keep it flowing. Indeed, government documents have revealed that plans to exploit Iraq’s oil reserves were discussed by ministers a whole year before the invasion and subsequent destruction of the country. FULL ARTICLE read more

Shell to build world’s largest hydrogen plant of its kind in Germany

The project, with ITM Power, will take shape at the Wesseling site of the Rhineland refinery. With a capacity of ten megawatts, it would be the largest plant of its kind in Germany and the largest PEM (polymer electrolyte membrane) electrolysis in the world. Shell represented by Shell Deutschland Oil GmbH and Shell Energy Europe Ltd, together with the European consortium partners ITM Power plc, SINTEF, thinkstep and Element Energy, have been invited by the European Fuel Cells and Hydrogen 2 Joint Undertaking (FCH 2 JU) to prepare a contract to promote the project. FULL ARTICLE read more

What You Missed in Royal Dutch Shell plc’s Quarterly Report

What Shell looks like now

There’s no question about how Royal Dutch Shell makes money. It is one of the world’s largest oil and natural gas drillers, with a large footprint in liquified natural gas. Oil and gas have been the driving force, broadly speaking, throughout all of the company’s over 100-years of existence. Investor questions generally focus on what management is doing to support and grow its core operations. FULL ARTICLE

Up to 800 possible jobs for solar farm which has been given green light

The 250MW Delga Solar Farm will be built 25km south-west of Wandoan. This continues the prominence of Wandoan in the region, adding to the largest solar farm in Australia to be built in the area, as well as the approval for a new coal mine. FULL ARTICLE

Big Oil Follows Silicon Valley Into Backing Green Energy Firms

Major oil companies are joining Silicon Valley in backing energy-technology start-ups, a signal that that those with the deepest pockets in the industry are casting around for a new strategy. From Royal Dutch Shell Plc to Total SA and Exxon Mobil Corp., the biggest investor-owned oil companies are dribbling money into ventures probing the edge of energy technologies. The investments go beyond wind and solar power into projects that improve electricity grids and brew new fuels from renewable resources. read more

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