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Posts under ‘Gulf of Mexico’

Shell’s Ambitious Plan To Topple Exxon

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By Rakesh Upadhyay – Jun 22, 2016, 5:17 PM CDT

Ben Van Beurden, Chief Executive Officer of Royal Dutch Shell has laid out an ambitious plan to overtake ExxonMobil as the number one oil company in the world.

Prior to the 1990s, Shell was the leader in total shareholder returns, however, its rivals went on a deal-making spree to gain the lead, while Shell shied away from making any acquisitions. Now, Mr. Beurden believes that Shell will be able to regain its lost glory post the acquisition of the BG group.

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Shell ‘fracked’ well in field that spilled oil into Gulf

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NEW ORLEANS — Fracking chemicals were used on at least one of the four Shell oil wells in an offshore field that leaked nearly 90,000 gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico last month, but those chemicals were likely long gone before the spill, federal regulators tell WWL-TV.

The government approved the use of a “frac pack” on Well No. 8 in Shell’s Glider Field, about 95 miles south of Port Fourchon, La., on Feb. 12, 2015, according to summaries of drilling permits archived on the federal Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement website.

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Shell Pipeline Leaks 20,000 Gallons of Oil in California’s Central Valley

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Ryan Schleeter, Greenpeace | May 27, 2016

For the second time in two weeks, Shell has spilled thousands of gallons of oil, this time in California’s Central Valley.

Less than two weeks after dumping nearly 90,000 gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico, Shell Oil is at it again. The company’s San Pablo Bay Pipeline, which transports crude oil from California’s Central Valley to the San Francisco Bay Area, leaked an estimated 21,000 gallons into the soil near in San Joaquin County this week.

Responders are on the scene to clear oil that’s reached the surface, which county officials say covered roughly 10,000 square feet of land. As of today, Shell representatives claim the pipeline has been repaired, but have not resumed operations.

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Shell AGM sees US Gulf drilling protest

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Eoin O’Cinneide  24 May 2016 13:15 GMT

Shell came under fire at its annual general meeting on Tuesday as a delegate led a photographic demonstration against the Anglo-Dutch supermajor’s deep-water drilling plans in the US Gulf of Mexico.

Gulf Coast resident Monique Verdin turned up at the meeting at The Hague headquarters to display 10-foot prints of her photographs depicting what she says is the environmental and community impact of US Gulf drilling.

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NEW FILM EXPOSES SHELL OIL SPILL WORKERS AT SERIOUS RISK FOR CHEMICAL EXPOSURE

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May 21, 2016 (San Diego) — Mark Manning, director of The Road to Fallujah, has been covering the BP Oil Spill for six years. Being immersed in the communities suffering severe health circumstances following that spill and the risky ‘clean-up’ operations using chemical dispersants prompted him to act on the current response to the Shell spill off the Louisiana coast last Thursday.

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Manning released a short outtake from his documentary film on http://www.therisingfilm.tv/ and his Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/TheRisingDocumentary/ highlighting the risks that all spill workers face and the risks that current Shell clean-up contractors are unknowingly facing today.

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Houma woman to stage protest at Shell AGM

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Screen Shot 2016-04-20 at 13.50.03Written by Keith Findlay – 18/05/2016 6:32 am

A representative of the native American Houma Nation Council will attend Shell’s annual general meeting next week to call on the board and investors to put an end to new offshore leases in the Gulf of Mexico.

Monique Verdin, who lives on the Louisiana coast, is travelling to Tuesday’s gathering in the Netherlands with the support of both the Indigenous Environmental Network (IEN) and UK Tar Sands Network (UKTSN).

IEN and UKTSN are pressure groups opposed to new drilling in the Gulf, claiming fossil fuel exploitation is causing major environmental damage in the region.

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Shell working on repairs after Gulf of Mexico spill

Screen Shot 2016-05-17 at 15.34.57By Daniel J. GraeberMay 17, 2016

NEW ORLEANS, May 17 (UPI) — A fleet of vessels was deployed in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico and repair work is underway in response to the spill of 2,100 barrels of oil, Shell said.

Shell reported the release from its Glider field about 100 miles south of the coast of Louisiana last week. The company said about 2,100 barrels of oil spilled and crews so far have recovered about 2,000 barrels of an oil-water mixture from the water’s surface.

In its latest update, Shell said there are five vessels on site working with Shell and the U.S. Coast Guard to recover oil from the surface. One vessel is designated specifically to asses any potential environmental impact from the release.

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Scientists head out to study Shell spill in the Gulf

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NEW ORLEANS

Researchers are heading out to study the effects of a Shell leak of about 88,200 gallons of oil off the Louisiana coast in the Gulf of Mexico, a scientist said on Monday.

Last Thursday, a leak from a pipeline at the Shell oil production field was spotted and cleanup vessels began to skim oil off the Gulf on Friday.

The cleanup ended Monday evening. The leak was contained after wells flowing into the pipeline were shut in.

Ian MacDonald, an oceanographer at Florida State University, said the scientists should reach the oil slick by Wednesday.

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Protestors to march following Shell oil spill in Gulf of Mexico

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AAPWorldSaturday, 14 May 2016

US environmental activists are preparing to march against offshore drilling as the clean-up of another Gulf of Mexico oil spill gets under way.

Five vessels are working on the spill off the coast of Louisiana after about 334-thousand litres of oil poured out of a Shell flow line.

Green groups say the disaster is another example of why offshore drilling should be banned, and will demand an end to the practice at a protest in Washington, DC, tomorrow.

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Shell moving some jobs from New Orleans to Houston

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By Jennifer Larino, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune: 18 APRIL 2016

Shell will relocate some jobs from New Orleans to Houston as it moves forward with plans to cut its global workforce by 10,000 employees and contractors. The company started cutting jobs last year in response to low oil prices.

Details are sparse on how the global cuts affect the roughly 1,900 workers based in One Shell Square in downtown New Orleans. Shell says it does not provide layoff counts by region. Workers close to the situation have reported that jobs may be moving to Houston in addition to cuts. They asked not to be named to protect their jobs.

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Lower oil without higher growth

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Screen Shot 2016-03-28 at 11.17.16By Ed Crooks: April 8, 2016

The failure of falling oil prices to give much of a boost to global growth has been one of the big issues in the world economy this year. The FT’s Chris Giles gave a magisterial overview of why oil has been the shot in the arm that missed its target, although he raised the more cheerful possibility that the stimulus may simply be deferred until next year.

The correlation between oil prices and share prices has remained in full effect, even though an unexpected drop in US crude inventories boosted oil for a while. Brent crude began Friday at about $40 per barrel, up 48 per cent from its low point in January, but still down 65 per cent from its peak in June 2014.

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The downside of cheap oil

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By Ed Crooks: 25 March 2016

Probably the greatest puzzle of the oil crash is why it hasn’t done more to strengthen global growth. The shift in purchasing power from companies and governments of oil-producing countries to consumers puts money in the pockets of people who are more likely to spend it, and that should act as a stimulus. It hasn’t quite worked out like that.

This week the FT launched a series titled ‘Lower for Longer’ exploring some of the reasons why. Number One on the list of likely explanations is the mountain of debts the industry built up during the boom times. Oil and gas company debt almost tripled from $1.1tn to $3tn between 2006 and 2014, according to the Bank for International Settlements, which has done some important research on the issue.  The oil industry, energy markets and the world economy are all struggling with the burden of that debt: the hangover after the oil investment boom of the past decade. Investors have lost at least $150bn in oil and gas company bonds, and over $2tn in equity values.

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Largest U.S. refinery now belongs to Saudi Arabia

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Reuters reported that the relationship started to fray after Motiva announced a $10 billion expansion of the Port Arthur refinery, doubling its capacity to 603,000 barrels per day, making it America’s largest refinery. It produced gasoline, diesel and jet fuel. A leak shortly after the expansion was completed in 2012 led to ballooning costs, exacerbating tension between Shell and Aramco. A 2015 workers strike also sparked anger between the two companies.

The two companies signed a nonbinding letter of intent, a plan that would divide up Motiva’s refineries between them. The refineries have a combined capacity of 1.1 million barrels per day and are all located close to each other. The breakup will allow Saudi Aramco to take over the Port Arthur refinery and 26 distribution terminals, and Aramco will also hold onto the Motiva brand name. Shell will take over the other two refineries, Convent and Norco, both located in Louisiana. Shell said that it would operate the two refineries as one plant with a combined throughput of 500,000 barrels per day.

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Time to End ‘Blood Oil’ Disaster in the Niger Delta

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By Richard SteinerProfessor and conservation biologist, Oasis Earth (www.oasis-earth.com): 10 MARCH 2016

The Niger Delta’s legendary “blood oil” disaster has persisted for decades, and is now deepening. Oil in the Delta fuels a dangerous mix of environmental devastation, a violent militancy that has killed thousands, human rights abuses, corporate greed and exploitation, epidemic corruption, massive oil theft, sabotage, repression, poverty, anger and despair. It is time to put an end to this ongoing atrocity, once and for all.

The 30,000 square mile Niger Delta — including rich coastal waters, islands, mangroves swamps, and rainforests — was once one of the most productive and diverse ecological habitats on Earth. But today, after 60 years of oil extraction, the region’s environment and society are devastated — a textbook example of the “oil curse.

The Delta is arguably the most severely oil-damaged environment anywhere in the world. A decade ago, our team of scientists conducting an oil damage assessment in the Delta estimated that each year, some 250,000 barrels (10 million gallons) of oil spill there, an amount comparable to that of the 1989 Exxon Valdez spill in Alaska — each year for 50 years. Oil operations have also caused extensive habitat degradation from road building, forest clearing, dredging and filling, thousands miles of pipelines, and chronic pollution from gas flaring and drilling wastes.

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An oilman’s $7 billion refresher course in the economics of drilling and climate change

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To many analysts, it looked like Odum was pushed into leaving.

Steven Mufson March 11, 2016

Marvin Odum, president of Shell Oil, was attending a meeting of the parent company’s executive committee in Singapore when word trickled in that an exploration well drilled in Alaska’s Chukchi Sea — the crowning step in a multi-year $7 billion quest — was a dry hole.

Maybe not bone dry. In a recent interview, Odum wouldn’t say. But in the oil business glossary, a dry hole is one that can’t pay off commercially, and Shell’s hole definitely qualified. The parent company, Royal Dutch Shell, abruptly dropped any further drilling — a setback for the industry, though a relief for environmentalists.

For years, they had fought a vigorous, litigious and politically intense battle over the Chukchi. Meanwhile Shell, lured by potentially rich rewards, had overcome a couple of embarrassing rig mishaps at sea and patiently navigated the courts and the Obama administration’s permitting process. Now, geology had rendered its verdict.

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Alaska failure not behind exit – Shell’s outgoing U.S. chief

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Royal Dutch Shell’s (RDSa.L) costly flameout in Alaska last year was “a huge disappointment,” but did not push top North American executive Marvin Odum to exit the company, he said.

Odum made the comments hours after the company announced he would leave next month after 34 years.

“This should not be interpreted as, ‘Alaska didn’t work, so Marvin’s leaving,” Odum, 57, said in an interview.

Instead, he said he decided it was time to move on after heading Shell Oil Co, the Anglo-Dutch company’s U.S arm, since 2008. He later became head of exploration and production operations in the Americas as well.

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Shell replaces U.S. chief, splits unconventionals unit

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HOUSTON | BY KRISTEN HAYS AND RON BOUSSO: Wed Feb 24, 2016 3:42pm EST

Royal Dutch Shell’s U.S. head Marvin Odum will step down after the company abandoned a troubled drilling project offshore Alaska, and the global oil company said on Wednesday it will split up its U.S. shale and Canadian oil sands unit.

Stung by a 70 percent slide in crude prices since mid-2014, Shell this month reported its lowest annual income in more than a decade and pledged further cost saving measures.

The Anglo-Dutch company said on Wednesday its shale resources unit would become part of the global upstream business led by Andy Brown, and its Athabasca Oil Sands Project and Scotford Upgrader in Canada would be folded into the global downstream unit, headed by John Abbott.

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Shell Shareholders Approve Acquisition of BG Group

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Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 08.12.50Shell Shareholders Approve Acquisition of BG Group

By STANLEY REEDJAN. 27, 2016

LONDON — In one of the first major deals struck as oil prices plummeted, Royal Dutch Shell shareholders on Wednesday approved the acquisition of the BG Group, the Britain-based oil and gas producer, for about $50 billion.

Analysts had expected major oil companies like Shell and ExxonMobil to take advantage of low prices to acquire rivals or smaller companies to strengthen their position, but there have been few big moves so far, perhaps because of the steepness of the drop in oil prices, which have fallen since the summer of 2014 to around $30 a barrel from more than $100 dollar a barrel.

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US Gulf oil spill nearly ruined BP, says chief Bob Dudley

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Screen Shot 2015-12-07 at 20.08.32Saturday 2 Jan 2016

The giant oil spill from a BP rig off the US coast in 2010 nearly ruined the company, its chief executive has said.

Bob Dudley described the fire on the Deepwater Horizon and its aftermath as “a near death experience” for the firm.

It was one of the worst environmental disasters in the US and saw BP pay fines and compensation and sell off more than £30bn ($45bn) in assets.

Mr Dudley told ex-BP boss Lord Browne – a guest editor on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme – it was a “tragic accident”.

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OPEC Won’t Cut Drilling, and Prices Plunge 5%

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By CLIFFORD KRAUSSA version of this article appears in print on December 8, 2015, on page B1 of the New York edition

HOUSTON — Crude oil prices slid a further 5 percent on Monday to fall to their lowest levels since the 2009 global recession, pummeled by the fading chance that Saudi Arabia would cut production to halt the commodity’s yearlong slide.

In only 16 months global oil prices have collapsed from over $110 a barrel to less than half that, and the oil industry in the United States and around the world is reeling from its worst crisis since the late 1990s. On Monday, the American benchmark broke the $38-a-barrel mark, a price that makes drilling and completing wells a losing proposition in almost all oil fields around the country.

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Shell Forced to Scale Back Ambitions

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Screen Shot 2015-11-20 at 08.55.47By James StaffordThu, 26 November 2015

As with most oil companies, 2015 has been a rough year for Royal Dutch Shell. The Anglo-Dutch company reported a third quarter loss of $6 billion, which included $7.9 billion in impairment charges.

During its third quarter earnings call, Shell’s CEO Ben van Beurden summed up the company’s strategy, emphasizing restraint. “Grow to simplify” is how he put it. What that means in practice is scrapping the Arctic campaign; pulling out of the expensive Carmon Creek oil sands project in Canada; shedding assets in the less desirable parts of North American shale; selling assets elsewhere around the world, including Nigeria; and focusing on its merger with BG, which is a big bet on LNG.

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Shell’s £22,500 fine for North Sea oil spill slammed as ‘paltry’ by campaigners

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Screen Shot 2015-11-21 at 00.19.03The World Wildlife Fund warned the size of the fine would ‘do little to deter future poor behaviour’

Shell apologised for the lack of information and said it was not a deliberate attempt to cover up the spill. 

Adam Barnett: 24 November 2015

A £22,500 fine imposed on the energy giant Shell as punishment for the worst North Sea oil spill in a decade has been dismissed as “paltry” by environmental campaigners.

The World Wildlife Fund (WWF) warned the size of the fine, for a company that earns billions, would “do little to deter future poor behaviour” by oil and gas companies to avoid more damage to the environment.

The leak from the Gannet Alpha platform in August 2011 was the worst in the region in 10 years and saw more than 200 tons of oil – about 1,300 barrels – flood into the sea. 

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Shell finds 100 million oil barrels in deep-water Gulf discovery

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Posted on November 18, 2015 | By Collin Eaton

HOUSTON — Probing one of its recent discoveries in deep waters of the Gulf of Mexico, Royal Dutch Shell found 100 million barrels of oil equivalent buried at its Kaikias field, nearby three of its massive production facilities and a network of subsea pipes, the company said Wednesday.

The one-year-old Kaikias discovery, about 60 miles south of the Louisiana coast in the Mars-Ursa basin, is nowhere near the size of the big-ticket deep-water oil fields that Shell uncovered in that region two decades ago.

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An Oil-Soaked Globe as Production Keeps Climbing and Demand Falls

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A version of this article appears in print on November 14, 2015, on page B1 of the New York edition

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HOUSTON — Such is the state of the oil industry these days that there is sometimes nowhere to put the oil. Off the coast of Texas, a line of roughly 40 tankers has formed, waiting to unload their crude or, in some cases, for a willing buyer to come along. Similar scenes are playing out off the coasts of Singapore and China and in the Persian Gulf.

There is little sign that the logjam will ease, as the price of oil continued its yearlong plunge this week, declining by nearly $10 a barrel.

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Shell vessel heads to deep Gulf waters amid region’s uncertainty

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Screen Shot 2015-09-17 at 07.55.40Posted on November 13, 2015 | By Collin Eaton

HOUSTON — Royal Dutch Shell’s newest oil-production vessel began a 15,000-mile journey this week from a Singapore shipyard to the world’s deepest underwater oil field, tasked with adding more crude to a worldwide oil glut that could upend industry plans to venture deeper offshore.

The $1 billion globe-trotting ship is bearing toward the Gulf of Mexico, and is set to become the fourth ultra deep-water production facility to extract hydrocarbons from a region called the Lower Tertiary, which for oil companies is at the edge of charted U.S. waters. Shell plans to begin filling barrels next year with oil from two wells drilled in about 9,500 feet of water — the deepest-ever depth.

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Shell affiliates are buyers, sellers in $390 million midstream transaction

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Screen Shot 2015-11-12 at 09.52.10Posted on November 11, 2015 | By Joshua Cain

A pipeline subsidiary of Royal Dutch Shell has sold a crude terminal in Illinois and a pipeline system in the Gulf of Mexico for $390 million to a master limited partnership affiliated with Shell.

Shell Midstream Partners, the Houston-based MLP that Shell formed in 2014, said on Wednesday that it will buy Pecten Midstream from another Shell subsidiary, Shell Pipeline Co.

Pecten Midstream operates the Lockport Crude Terminal about 50 miles from Chicago and the Auger Pipeline System, which transports crude oil from parts of the Garden Banks and Keathley Canyon offshore blocks in the Gulf.

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Profit Down at BP, Which Predicts Era of Low Oil Prices

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By STANLEY REED: OCT. 27, 2015

LONDON — The British oil giant BP said on Tuesday that its profit was down sharply in the third quarter as depressed oil prices took a heavy toll.

The company, saying it expects prices to stay low for years, indicated that it would continue to cut costs and limit its investments in searching for and developing new oil and gas fields.

“We are now in action to rebalance our financial framework in this new price environment,” BP’s chief executive, Robert W. Dudley, said in a statement.

The company said its profit in the quarter was $46 million, compared with $1.3 billion a year earlier. Profit on the basis of underlying replacement cost, a more widely used figure, fell to $1.8 billion for the quarter from $3 billion a year earlier.

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Britain’s oil giants to post worst set of earnings since rout in price of crude began last year

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By LAURA CHESTERS FOR THE DAILY MAIL: 25 October 2015

Britain’s oil giants will this week post their worst set of earnings since the rout in the price of crude began last year.

Investors will also be looking for any update on Royal Dutch Shell’s £55bn takeover of rival BG Group amid fears Shell is overpaying.

Shell, BG and BP will all post third-quarter earnings this week with the City expecting an average of a 60 per cent collapse in profits, according to experts at Morgan Stanley, suggesting the industry is facing its worse downturn in a decade.

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Shell and BP prepare for further cost-cutting as oil prices stay low

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Results this week could give more detail on savings to protect dividend payments

By Marion Dakers: 24 Oct 2015

Britain’s oil giants are preparing to make further cuts to their investment plans in the face of plummeting crude prices.

Shell, like many oil explorers, has already slashed spending and jobs to counteract the effects of a 40pc slump in oil prices in the past year, with the price sliding as low as $43 a barrel from highs of more than $110 in 2014.

However, Shell is this week expected to unveil a new round of cuts alongside its third quarter results, which are set to show a 38pc slump in sales to $67bn (£43.7bn) and a 54pc drop in adjusted earnings.

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Shell had to write-down some of its shale assets in the U.S., after spending $24 billion on a bet that failed to pay off, with company executives regretting ever having made the investment.

By James Stafford: Wed, 14 October 2015

A new report finds that the largest oil companies are set to cut spending on exploration by at least half, potentially leading to very few new oil discoveries in the years ahead.

The report from investment bank Tudor, Pickering, Hold & Co., and reported by Fuel Fix, estimates that exploration budgets among the oil majors will drop to $25 billion in 2016, down from $50 billion from just a few years ago. Obviously, low oil prices are taking their toll, forcing deep spending cuts in a desperate attempt to shore up profitability. But the cuts have large implications for the energy sector, increasing the chances that some large oil fields remain undeveloped for years.

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Shell Is Reeling After Pulling Out of the Arctic

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Screen Shot 2015-10-04 at 09.03.21BY ANTONIA JUHASZ / OCTOBER 13, 2015

Earlier this month, Shell’s tumultuous Arctic drilling campaign came to an abrupt and costly end. In a written statement, the company announced the cessation of its offshore Alaska activities “for the foreseeable future”—at a loss of billions of dollars. This both stunned and thrilled critics, many of whom worried that the seven-year effort to stop Shell was dead in July, when the Obama administration approved the company’s permits to drill.

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Myths about Shell’s Arctic Alaska pullout persist

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Screen Shot 2015-10-04 at 09.03.21Yereth RosenAlaska Dispatch News: October 3, 2015

When Royal Dutch Shell announced that it had lost its big-money bet in the Chukchi Sea and would end its entire program in the offshore U.S. Arctic, the hyperbole and finger-pointing began in earnest.

Rep. Don Young accused President Obama and Interior Secretary Sally Jewell of deliberately sabotaging Alaska’s economy. “I’m sure somewhere Sally Jewell and President Obama are smiling and celebrating Shell’s decision to cease operations off the coast of Alaska,” Young said in a statement issued just after Shell’s announcement.

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Shell boss confronts environmental, carbon challenges

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On Monday, the oil and gas giant gritted its teeth and pulled out of one of the most ambitious, expensive and controversial exploration forays on the planet – Alaska. A project that could have delivered tens of billions of dollars instead delivered a dry well and, on Sunday, van Beurden and his team called it quits.

ANALYSIS: By The Business presenter Ticky Fullerton: 2 Oct 2015

Rarely have energy companies faced greater challenges, and global giant Shell has moved to tackle some of them head on.

Of all weeks to be in London to catch up with global Shell chief executive Ben van Beurden, this was it.

On Monday, the oil and gas giant gritted its teeth and pulled out of one of the most ambitious, expensive and controversial exploration forays on the planet – Alaska.

A project that could have delivered tens of billions of dollars instead delivered a dry well and, on Sunday, van Beurden and his team called it quits.

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Shell’s Arctic oil well comes up dry

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Screen Shot 2015-08-13 at 11.35.25September 28, 2015 | By Jennifer A. Dlouhy

WASHINGTON — After spending $7 billion and seven years searching for oil under Arctic waters, Royal Dutch Shell on Monday said its quest had come up dry.

Shell announced that its exploratory oil well in the Chukchi Sea north of Alaska encountered “indications of oil and gas” that are “not sufficient to warrant further exploration” — a significant blow for the Anglo-Dutch firm that had hoped to find a multibillion barrel crude reservoir in those remote waters.

“Shell continues to see important exploration potential in the basin, and the area is likely to ultimately be of strategic importance to Alaska and the U.S.,” said Marvin Odum, director of Shell Upstream Americas. “However, this is a clearly disappointing exploration outcome for this part of the basin.”

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Shell awaiting green light to begin Nova Scotia offshore drilling

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Screen Shot 2015-09-17 at 07.55.40Shell says 90 per cent of the supply vessel staff will come from Nova Scotia

25 Sept 2015

Four ships are standing by in Halifax Harbour, waiting for Shell Canada Ltd. to get the green light to hunt for oil in the deep waters of Nova Scotia.

The company expects to begin drilling two exploration wells in the Shelburne Basin within the next few months, pending approval from the Canada-Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Board.

“What we are waiting on at this point is the very important regulatory approvals and the availability of the ship conducting the drilling activity,” said Shell spokesperson Cameron Yost.

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IF SHELL FINDS OIL IN CHUKCHI SEA, WHAT NEXT?

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Screen Shot 2015-06-13 at 09.26.5318 September 2015

The short drilling season for oil exploration in U.S. Arctic offshore waters will reach one stopping point Sept. 28 and a complete halt Oct. 31 for Royal Dutch Shell Plc. The company has been drilling since July 30 at the Burger prospect in the Chukchi Sea north of Alaska. If oil is discovered, it will require some very interesting and complicated development decisions and regulatory considerations.

Shell has come a long way to get this far. It acquired a set of leases over the Burger prospect in 2008 and has spent about $7 billion on trying to develop the leases. Shell, operating through its subsidiary Shell Gulf of Mexico Inc., did not report a discovery from the well it drilled in 2012, and no one has ever yet discovered oil in the Chukchi — not oil in commercial quantities, at any rate. A dry hole is always a possibility.

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Shell’s big gamble: Oil wrangling at the far reaches of the Arctic frontier

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By Steven Mufson September 11

Shell Oil Co.’s president Marvin Odum made the trip on Sept. 2 from Houston to this northern-most town in the United States, a spot whose traditional name, Ukpeagvik, means “place where snowy owls are hunted.”

Odum is here hunting, too, for oil offshore and political support from Alaska Natives living in Barrow, a ramshackle town of muddy streets, littered with all-terrain vehicles and guarded by snow fences on one side and on the other a four-foot-high earthen berm to protect against high winds and seas.

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Shell bringing world’s deepest floating oil production vessel to Gulf of Mexico

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By Jennifer Larino, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune: 9 Sept 2015

Royal Dutch Shell has launched its first floating oil production, storage and offloading vessel in the Gulf of Mexico. The facility will operate in 9,500 feet of water, making it the deepest of its kind in the world.

The vessel — named Turritella after a genus of sea snails with a long conical, spiraled shell — is part of the company’s multibillion-dollar Stones development about 200 miles southwest of New Orleans in the ultra-deep waters of the Gulf of Mexico. The facility is expected to start operations in early 2016.

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Shell confirms has canceled Westward Ho pipeline project

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Screen Shot 2015-07-31 at 19.22.09HOUSTON | BY KRISTEN HAYS: Tue Sep 8, 2015

Royal Dutch Shell shelved its Louisiana-to-Texas Westward Ho pipeline after years of delays, reductions in scope and after other new pipelines began flowing, a spokeswoman confirmed on Tuesday.

“After a thorough review and as a result of changing market conditions, Shell Pipeline Company LP has decided to not proceed with the proposed Westward Ho Pipeline project,” spokeswoman Kimberly Windon said.

Proposed in 2011 at a top capacity of 900,000 barrels per day, Shell said Westward Ho would move Gulf of Mexico and imported crudes from the St. James, Louisiana oil hub to Houston. The leg between Nederland, Texas and Houston would move up to 500,000 bpd, and the entire project was targeted to start in late 2015.

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Discussing the costs of disaster for offshore US oil : Regulation and Environment

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Screen Shot 2015-08-28 at 08.10.57In this week’s Oilgram News column, Regulation and Environment, Gary Gentile asks if the risks associated with ultra-deepwater oil production endeavors are properly disclosed to shareholders.

By Gary Gentile | August 31, 2015

Opponents of offshore drilling in frontier environments, such as the Arctic, have opened up a new front in their effort to curtail such efforts — asking US financial regulators to require more robust disclosure of the risks involved.

A group of Democrats in the US Congress have asked the Securities and Exchange Commission to force companies to tell investors the cost of a catastrophic accident resulting from drilling in ultra-deepwaters or in the harsh and remote waters off the coast of Alaska.

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President Obama Defends Shell Arctic Drilling Decision

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By: MICHEAL KAUFMAN: Aug 29, 2015 

Critics argue that allowing Shell to explore Arctic for oil goes against the country’s stance on climate change

President Obama has defended his decision to grant approval for drilling in the Arctic region, ahead of his trip to Alaska. Royal Dutch Shell plc (ADR) (NYSE:RDS.A) had been seeking the US government’s permission to conduct oil exploration in offshore Arctic. Last month, Shell was granted permission to drill a well off the coast of Alaska. The decision has been criticized heavily, as environmentalists have been quick to point out the risks associated with drilling in the Arctic.

President Obama’s Clean Power Plan, announced earlier this month, has also come in the line of fire. The plan, which calls for a 32% reduction in carbon emissions from power plants in the US, is aimed at reducing the country’s carbon footprint, as the US tries to lead the charge in the battle against climate change. Critics argue that allowing Shell to explore Arctic for oil goes against the country’s stance on climate change.

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Shell offshore drilling application prompts conflict-of-interest charge

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By Charles Mandel | August 29th 2015

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Shell Canada Limited is applying to bring offshore drilling to Nova Scotia’s waters. But environmentalists are raising alarm bells over potential conflict of interest, as the group reviewing Shell’s application — the Canada-Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Board (CNSOPB) — includes a board member who worked at Shell Canada and Royal Dutch Shell for 30 years.

The federal Privy Council Office re-appointed Douglas Gregory as an alternate board member in March, 2014.

Gregory’s background includes work as an exploration geophysicist in Canada; and in 1999 opening Shell Canada’s exploration office, focused on deep water seismic exploration within Nova Scotia’s waters.

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Obama defends Shell Arctic drilling decision

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Screen Shot 2015-08-13 at 11.35.25By AFP 29 August 2015

Two days before heading to Alaska to raise climate change awareness, US President Barack Obama on Saturday defended his controversial decision to allow Shell to drill in the Arctic’s Chukchi Sea.

The Obama administration’s green light for the Anglo-Dutch oil giant angered environmental groups which have decried the “hypocrisy” of the president, who in recent months has stressed the need for aggressive actions against climate change.

Opponents note how the decision comes in the run-up to the UN climate conference in Paris in December. The meeting is seen as crucial in efforts to forge an agreement to curb international emissions.

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Charlotte Church joins the campaign trail once again as she performs a requiem in musical protest over Arctic drilling

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By REBECCA DAVISON FOR MAILONLINE: 26 August 2015

Singer Charlotte Church joined a protest rally outside the Shell headquarters in London on Wednesday in protest over Arctic drilling on behalf of Greenpeace. 

The 29-year-old took to the streets to lead a performance of Requiem for Arctic Ice as well as The Bitter Earth outside the building, writing ‘Save The Arctic’ across her hands in pen. 

According to Greenpeace, the campaign was part of the charity’s month-long run of Titanic-themed orchestral protests.

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Oil Companies Sit on Hands at Auction for Leases

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By CLIFFORD KRAUSSAUG. 20, 2015 PAGE B1 IN NEW YORK EDITION

Screen Shot 2015-08-04 at 22.49.59HOUSTON — With oil prices collapsing and companies in retrenchment, a federal auction in the Gulf of Mexico on Wednesday attracted the lowest interest from producers since 1986.

It was the clearest sign yet that the fortunes of oil companies are skidding so fast that they now need to cut back on plans for production well into the future.

The auction, for drilling leases, attracted a scant $22.7 million in sales from five companies, but energy analysts said that came as no surprise on a day when the American oil benchmark price plummeted by more than 4 percent. For the first time since the recession, it is approaching the symbolic $40-a-barrel level. Last summer, it was above $100 a barrel.

A glut on American and world markets is to blame for the depressed prices, but the unusually large daily decline occurred after the Energy Department, in a report, lowered its oil price projections and showed a considerable increase in inventories.

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Hillary Clinton scuppers Shell’s plan to drill for oil in the Arctic

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Screen Shot 2015-08-13 at 11.35.25By CITY & FINANCE REPORTER FOR THE DAILY MAIL

PUBLISHED: 19 August 2015

Royal Dutch Shell’s Arctic ambitions have sparked a political row in the US after presidential candidate Hillary Clinton opposed its plans.

President Obama’s administration gave Shell the final green light to drill for oil and gas in the Arctic this week – which will see it resume drilling in the area for the first time since 2012 when it suffered a series of setbacks and pulled out. 

Clinton said drilling in the area is ‘not worth the risk’.

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BVB Personal Journey? Was it to a bank or a casino?

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By John Donovan

Royal Dutch Shell CEO Ben van Beurden claims that he has been on a personal journey in relation to authorising Shell’s latest Arctic gamble.

All due credit for the courage needed to take such a huge risk. The same applies to Shell’s takeover of the BG Group and the alliance with the corrupt and murderous Putin regime. All could go terribly wrong.

With regards to economics, the price of oil is an important factor in all three ventures. Shell has now admitted that oil prices are likely to remain low for some time. 

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Inside Shell’s Extreme Plan to Drill for Oil in the Arctic

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by Paul Barrett and Benjamin Elgin: 5 August 2015: BLOOMBERG.COM

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Protesters near the Polar Pioneer.: Photographer: Keri Coles/Greenpeace

Ann Pickard

Ann Pickard – Shell VP Arctic Drilling

In a windowless conference room in Anchorage, a dozen Royal Dutch Shell employees report on the highest-profile oil project in the multinational’s vast global portfolio. Warmed by mid-July temperatures, Arctic ice in the Chukchi Sea, northwest of the Alaskan mainland, is receding. Storms are easing; helicopter flights will soon resume. Underwater volcanoes—yes, volcanoes—are dormant. “That’s good news for us,” Ann Pickard, Shell’s top executive for the Arctic, whispers to a visitor.

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Shell toughens local project hurdles

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Screen Shot 2015-07-31 at 19.22.09Matt ChambersResources Reporter: Melbourne: 31 July 2015

Oil major Shell has laid down tougher hurdles for its Australian projects including Browse LNG off Western Australia and Arrow coal-seam gas in Queensland.

It has cut the oil price at which new projects need to go ahead and flagged a major LNG project ­pipeline overhaul if its planned $91 billion takeover of BG Group is successful.

Shell chief executive Ben van Beurden said the company would require projects to be profitable near $US50 a barrel of oil, down from previous indications of ­between $US70 and $US90.

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Big oil to sharpen focus on costs after $200bn of cuts

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Screen Shot 2015-07-27 at 08.40.27Europe’s biggest oil companies have to find deeper cuts as oil prices expected to weigh on earnings

By Andrew Critchlow, Commodities editor: 27 July 2015

Three of Europe’s biggest oil companies will report weaker earnings this week and the City is looking for guidance on how to mitigate a sustained slump in Brent crude prices beyond the cost cuts already in motion.

In a market defined by oil prices 60pc lower than they were a year ago, energy giants are running out of options to protect their bottom line and all-important progressive dividends.

The brakes have already been put on 45 oil and gas development projects worth $200bn (£129bn) since prices started to fall towards the end of last year, according to a new report from Edinburgh-based consultancy Wood Mackenzie. Combined, these projects account for around 20bn barrels of reserves. The danger is that international oil companies will reveal this week that even deeper cuts are planned, tipping the industry into a form of atrophy.

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