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Posts Tagged ‘Canada’

Goodbye Marvin Odum

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Screen Shot 2016-02-24 at 17.16.30Marvin Odum, unconventional resources director and U.S. country chair for Royal Dutch Shell, left the company. He joined Shell as an engineer in 1982. Concurrent with his departure, and in a move that will simplify Shell’s structure, the Athabasca Oil Sands Project and the Scotford Upgrader in Canada will join the global Downstream organization under Downstream Director John Abbott.

In addition, the Shale Resources business will join the global Upstream organization under Upstream Director Andy Brown. As a result of these changes, the unconventional resources director position is eliminated.

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Shelter-in-place order for Corunna a ‘precaution’

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Screen Shot 2016-04-28 at 20.41.15Shell’s refinery at Corunna manufactures gasoline, solvents, chemicals and other products. The World Health Organization says human exposure to benzene has been associated with a range of acute and long-term adverse health effects and diseases, including cancer and aplastic anemia.

By Paul Morden, Sarnia Observer: Thursday, April 28, 2016

A phone call from a neighbour of Shell’s refinery in Corunna alerted the company to an incident that resulted in a shelter-in-place advisory being issued Wednesday evening for a section of the St. Clair Township community.

It also led to emergency sirens sounding in Sarnia, and the activating of a community network notification system that sent out thousands of messages to Sarnia-Lambton residents.

Shell spokesperson Kristina Zimmer said that at approximately 4 p.m. Wednesday, “ A resident that lives on Curran Avenue had smelled this abnormal odour, and had called the site to notify us.”

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Dalhousie Dean of Science feared oil company’s revenge over divestment

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By Charles Mandel in News, Energy | April 27th 2016

For years, Royal Dutch Shell has tried to portray itself as one of the good guys in the battle against climate change. It recently completed improvements to an oil upgrader in Fort Saskatchewan, near Edmonton, to capture up to a third of its greenhouse gas emissions – equivalent to removing the annual pollution of about 250,000 cars.

On its website, the company posts stories about how to achieve a low-carbon-future and sponsors a fuel efficient vehicle in the eco-marathon.

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Environmental group files lawsuit over ‘expired’ Shell Arctic oil permits

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Bob Weber / The Canadian Press: April 11, 2016

Environmentalists have asked a court to declare invalid a group of Arctic offshore energy exploration permits that are delaying the creation of Canada’s third national marine protected area.

On Monday, the World Wildlife Fund filed a lawsuit in Federal Court alleging that 30 permits held by Shell Canada at the eastern gate of the Northwest Passage lapsed decades ago.

“There’s no indication they’ve ever been renewed,” said Ian Miron, the group’s lawyer.

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Arctic Conservation Efforts Held Up By Shell Permits From 1970s

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By Bob Weber, The Canadian Press: Posted: 03/27/2016

Environmentalists say talks on creating a third national marine conservation area are being held up over Arctic offshore energy exploration permits that may not legally exist.

“Looking at the permits, it looks like the rights expired in 1979,” said Alex Speers-Roesch of Greenpeace.

The federal government has been trying for years to protect the waters of Lancaster Sound, the eastern gate of the Northwest Passage and home to a wealth of Arctic seabirds and mammals. The effort is strongly supported by local Inuit hunters and land claim groups.

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Australian Energy Giant Woodside Delays Large Offshore L.N.G. Project

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By STANLEY REED: A version of this article appears in print on March 24, 2016, on page B2 of the New York edition

Woodside Petroleum and its partners, including the energy giants Royal Dutch Shell and BP, have decided to delay indefinitely the development of a huge liquefied natural gas project off Western Australia, the company said on Wednesday.

The decision to postpone the project, called Browse, comes as L.N.G. prices in Asia have fallen by around two-thirds since 2014. The slump is attributed to a supply glut set off largely by a building boom and by lower-than-expected demand from major customers like China.

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An oilman’s $7 billion refresher course in the economics of drilling and climate change

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To many analysts, it looked like Odum was pushed into leaving.

Steven Mufson March 11, 2016

Marvin Odum, president of Shell Oil, was attending a meeting of the parent company’s executive committee in Singapore when word trickled in that an exploration well drilled in Alaska’s Chukchi Sea — the crowning step in a multi-year $7 billion quest — was a dry hole.

Maybe not bone dry. In a recent interview, Odum wouldn’t say. But in the oil business glossary, a dry hole is one that can’t pay off commercially, and Shell’s hole definitely qualified. The parent company, Royal Dutch Shell, abruptly dropped any further drilling — a setback for the industry, though a relief for environmentalists.

For years, they had fought a vigorous, litigious and politically intense battle over the Chukchi. Meanwhile Shell, lured by potentially rich rewards, had overcome a couple of embarrassing rig mishaps at sea and patiently navigated the courts and the Obama administration’s permitting process. Now, geology had rendered its verdict.

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Oil’s upwards rally

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By Ed Crooks: 11 March 2016

Oil this week continued its recent rally, with Brent crude clinging on above $40, but there was speculation that most of the gains of the past two months could be undone if Opec members and Russia failed to finalise their earlier conditional agreement to freeze production.

Reuters reported Opec sources as saying that a suggested meeting in Moscow on March 20 to confirm the deal was unlikely to take place. The critical factor is Iran; other countries say they will not meet to discuss joining the freeze unless Tehran agrees to sign up for it too. President Hassan Rouhani’s chief of staff told a conference in London that his country wanted to increase exports to regain its pre-sanctions market share before it would start talking about cuts. The same official, Mohammad Nahavandian, also sought to reassure international companies that the country would soon unveil new and improved contracts for investors in its oil and gas industry, even though the issue has raised concerns about attempts by foreign businesses to “loot Iran’s natural resources”.

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Shell boss Ben van Beurden bags a bigger bonus despite falling oil price

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RUSSELL LYNCH: 10 MARCH 2016

Royal Dutch Shell boss Ben van Beurden got a bigger bonus in 2015 — up 6% to €3.5 million (£2.7 million) — even though a tumbling oil price sank the shares by 30% last year.

The chief executive landed an overall pay deal of £5.6 million — although this was lower than 2014, when his package was swollen to €24.2 million by tax handouts and pension payments on taking the helm at the oil major.

Shell’s latest annual report showed his 2015 basic pay up to €1.47 million, but his annual bonus rising from €3.3 million to €3.5 million for a year in which van Beurden masterminded the oil giant’s mega-merger with rival BG.

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Shell Canada offshore drill incident drops equipment to sea floor

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Screen Shot 2016-03-07 at 20.59.41By Brett Ruskin, CBC News: 7 MARCH 2016

Severe weather caused a piece of equipment to break off a ship being used by Shell Canada to drill an exploratory oil well off the coast of Nova Scotia.

An official with Shell Canada confirmed Monday that the incident occurred on Saturday, about 225 kilometres offshore at the Cheshire well. The well is part of the company’s Shelburne Basin venture exploration drilling project.

A spokesperson for Shell Canada said in an email that workers on the Stena IceMAX — referred to by the company as the rig — had disconnected from the well in preparation for severe weather that was approaching.

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Shell Hopes To Sell $30 Billion In Assets, But Timing Is Terrible

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Screen Shot 2016-02-17 at 08.47.47By Irina Slav: 06 March 2016

Royal Dutch Shell is planning to sell assets worth a staggering $30 billion in a bid to prop up its balance sheet, after completing the $53-billion acquisition of BG Group last month. The majority of these soon-to-be-offloaded assets are in the midstream and downstream operations of the company.

The plans were first mentioned by Shell’s chief executive during a conference call at the beginning of February. Two anonymous Bloomberg sources familiar with the divestment program stated that this divestment may include pipelines in the U.S., a stake in a gas project in Trinidad and Tobago, and interests that Shell holds in oil and gas fields in India.

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The Allure Of Shale Is Wearing Off

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Screen Shot 2016-02-17 at 08.47.47By Nick CunninghamThu, 25 February 2016

Royal Dutch Shell revealed its plans to downgrade its emphasis on expensive shale operations, although it was not worded in those terms.

The Anglo-Dutch supermajor says that it would fold its “unconventional” unit (i.e. shale) into its broader upstream business. Shell also announced that Mavin Odum, long-time top official from the North American arm of Royal Dutch Shell, will retire after more than three decades at the company.

The two announcements are consistent with Shell’s decision to takeover BG, which was a large bet on LNG and offshore oil plays, particularly in Brazil and Australia. It is also evidence that Shell is deemphasizing its attention and resources on North America, where it has placed several costly bets that have soured. In 2013, Shell cancelled plans to build a $20 billion gas-to-liquids plant in Louisiana. In 2014, Shell sold off shale acreage in Texas, Colorado, and Kansas, according to Reuters, while also divesting itself of Pennsylvania and Louisiana shale gas assets.

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Alaska failure not behind exit – Shell’s outgoing U.S. chief

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Royal Dutch Shell’s (RDSa.L) costly flameout in Alaska last year was “a huge disappointment,” but did not push top North American executive Marvin Odum to exit the company, he said.

Odum made the comments hours after the company announced he would leave next month after 34 years.

“This should not be interpreted as, ‘Alaska didn’t work, so Marvin’s leaving,” Odum, 57, said in an interview.

Instead, he said he decided it was time to move on after heading Shell Oil Co, the Anglo-Dutch company’s U.S arm, since 2008. He later became head of exploration and production operations in the Americas as well.

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Arctic Was a Bet That Didn’t Pay Off, Departing Shell Chief Says

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Jennifer A Dlouhy: Bloomberg.com: 24 FEB 2016

The departing chief of Royal Dutch Shell Plc’s U.S. division, who presided over its failed quest to find crude in Arctic waters off Alaska, said the effort was still a point of pride because it demonstrated the company’s technical expertise.

Marvin Odum, 57, is leaving the company in a reorganization announced Wednesday. He has been with the company for 34 years and held the post atop its U.S. division, Shell Oil Co., since oil prices were at record highs.

The Arctic was “a big bet,” Odum said in a telephone interview Wednesday. 

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Shell replaces U.S. chief, splits unconventionals unit

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HOUSTON | BY KRISTEN HAYS AND RON BOUSSO: Wed Feb 24, 2016 3:42pm EST

Royal Dutch Shell’s U.S. head Marvin Odum will step down after the company abandoned a troubled drilling project offshore Alaska, and the global oil company said on Wednesday it will split up its U.S. shale and Canadian oil sands unit.

Stung by a 70 percent slide in crude prices since mid-2014, Shell this month reported its lowest annual income in more than a decade and pledged further cost saving measures.

The Anglo-Dutch company said on Wednesday its shale resources unit would become part of the global upstream business led by Andy Brown, and its Athabasca Oil Sands Project and Scotford Upgrader in Canada would be folded into the global downstream unit, headed by John Abbott.

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Shell pushes back investment decision on Canadian LNG project

Screen Shot 2016-02-05 at 11.12.10VANCOUVER | BY JULIE GORDON: 4 FEB 2016

British Columbia’s ambitions to become North America’s next major liquefied natural gas exporter took another hit on Thursday, as Royal Dutch Shell pushed back a final investment decision (FID) on its LNG Canada project to late 2016.

The delay came as Europe’s largest oil company reported its lowest annual income in over a decade and said it would take further steps to cut costs to cope with weak oil prices if needed.

LNG Canada, located on British Columbia’s rugged northern coastline, is one of the frontrunners in a now slowing race to build Canada’s first LNG export terminal. It has already been granted its key environmental permits.

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Shell Profits Plunge By 80% Amid Oil Slump

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Shell is pressing ahead with a £36bn ($52bn) merger with exploration group BG. It has said 10,000 jobs will go across the two companies as a result. The deal has been approved by shareholders and will complete later this month.

The industry has been hammered by the collapse in the world energy market which has seen the price of a barrel of Brent crude dive by three-quarters from $115 in the summer of 2014 to around $30 at the start of this year.

Mr van Beurden said Shell was seeing “substantial changes”, slashing costs and investment in response to the slump – and warned that more cuts could come.

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LIVELY POSTINGS ON SHELL BLOG 1 FEB 2016

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“TEXVETTE”

Looks like Marvin Odum was stripped of key responsibilities and placed in a lame Role. Ironically he will have to clean up the messes he left in Alaska and Unconventionals. A bit of Karma, but he should no longer be on the payroll after all his major mistakes.

“OUTSIDER”

The merger of Shell T&T and Royal Dutch in 2004 resulted in a major loss to the UK exchequer, as the taxes previously paid by Shell T&T went to the Dutch government instead. Presumably the taxes previously paid by BG will now go to the Dutch government too?

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Will Royal Dutch Shell Eliminate Its Dividend This Year?

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Screen Shot 2015-11-20 at 08.55.47Extracts from an article by Lior Cohen: JAN 14, 2016

Shell’s stock shed 10% off its value over the last month, as the price of oil dwindled.

Following this fall, the dividend yield is currently at 9.4% – a historic level.

Some investors think that because the company paid and raised its dividend since WW2, it means it won’t deviate at this stage. But let’s not forget that times are changing. And if Shell were to face say a Gulf of Mexico oil spill as BP (NYSE:BP) encountered back in 2010, you can bet the dividend will be eliminated in a heartbeat – especially in times of low oil prices. But even without a major oil spill, the current oil price environment stresses Shell’s cash reserves.

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Shell-led joint venture gets key permit for LNG facility in Kitimat, B.C.

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By The Canadian Press in News | January 6th 2016

A Shell-led joint venture company has obtained a key permit to build a liquefied natural gas export facility in northern British Columbia.

LNG Canada is the first in the province to receive a facility permit from the B.C. Oil and Gas Commission. The document outlines the requirements for design, construction and operation of the proposed facility in Kitimat, B.C.

Director of external affairs Susannah Pierce said it’s a crucial development for the project, following environmental approval from federal and provincial authorities last June.

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Oil Prices Could Collapse To $20

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By Tyler Durden

Extracts from extracts…

Could oil prices collapse to $20? 

The short answer is ‘yes.’

We believe that crude oil prices could fall further unless global oil production is reduced. As shown in Table 2, we estimate that the global oil market could be oversupplied by roughly 920,000 bpd in 2016. The key assumptions are year-over-year growth in global demand of 1.2 million bpd, Saudi Arabia, Iraq and Libya hold production at current levels, Iran ramps up production at moderate pace over the course of the year and the U.S. rig count remains at current levels.

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Shell Cutting Salaried Positions At Corunna

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Screen Shot 2015-11-20 at 08.55.47By Dave Dentinger on December 8, 2015: BLACKBURNNEWS.COM 

Shell Canada is cutting an unspecified number of salaried positions at its Corunna refinery in 2016 to remain competitive in a challenging economy.

Spokesman Randy Provencal says he can’t get into numbers at this point but the reductions will affect employees like engineers and office support staff and not hourly workers.

“The employees who are working in the plant, running the plant, they’re not impacted by these staffing reductions,” says Provencal.

“Shell is taking the necessary steps to ensure our manufacturing site here in Corunna is competitive through all economic cycles, right now what we’re doing is exploring a number of efficiencies which will result in some staff reductions in the coming year.”

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By Charles Mandel | November 25th 2015

Screen Shot 2015-11-20 at 08.55.47A handful of protesters from Sum of Us, Greenpeace, the Ecology Action and the Clean Ocean Action Committee delivered a massive 233,000-signature petition to the Canada-Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Board (CNSOPB) opposing what they said were extremely lax safety standards around Shell’s drilling program. Currently, if a subsea oil well blowout were to occur, the company would be allowed to take 12 to 13 days to contain it. Shell’s original proposal suggested it could take 21 days to get a capping stack to the site.

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Royal Dutch Shell, Exxon Mobil and Glencore: Energy companies risk wasting trillions on uneconomic projects

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By Jessica Morris: 25 November 2015

Energy companies risk wasting $2.2 trillion (£1.46 trillion) on uneconomic projects over the next 10 years, according to a new report.

Think tank the Carbon Tracker Initiative’s (CTI) report how fossil fuel firms risk destroying investor returns says energy companies’ focus on fossil fuels at the expense of emerging clean technologies could put them out of kilter with environmental regulation, which will eventually dampen demand.

It comes ahead of next week’s Paris Climate Change Conference (COP21) which is expected to result in, or at least pave the way for, more climate change legislation.

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Shell Canada fined $825,000 for Sarnia refinery pollution

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CALGARY, ALBERTA

Nov 24 The Ontario government on Tuesday ordered Shell Canada, a wholly owned subsidiary of Royal Dutch Shell, to pay C$825,000 ($620,487.36) in fines for discharging a contaminating odour from its Sarnia refinery in 2013.

In a statement, the Ontario Ministry for Environment and Climate Change said Shell had pleaded guilty to one offense of permitting a discharge of an odour containing mercaptan, a foul-smelling gas.

The Shell Sarnia Manufacturing Centre is located in Corunna, Ontario, and on Jan. 11, 2013, employees discovered a leak from a line containing mercaptan, which flowed into an on-site ditch that empties into the refinery’s storm sewer system.

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Lorraine Mitchelmore is stepping down as the head of Shell Canada. But she’s not going quietly.

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Screen Shot 2015-11-20 at 08.55.47NOVEMBER 18, 2015 10:20 AM

Extracts

Shell has reduced greenhouse gas emissions by 20 per cent per barrel from its oilsands business in the past five years, through many small efforts, including making more efficient use of its trucks.

Yet that hasn’t stopped Shell from being a target and paying a high price for the anti-oilsands campaign.

Last month it cancelled the 80,000-barrels-a-day Carmon Creek oilsands project in Peace River in mid-construction, taking a $2-billion impairment charge.

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Shell share price: Canada boss leaves company

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Screen Shot 2015-10-28 at 08.03.29by Veselin ValchevTuesday, 17 Nov 2015, 11:18 GMT

Royal Dutch Shell Plc (LON:RDSA) announced yesterday that the boss of the firm’s Canada division, Lorraine Mitchelmore, is stepping down from the company at the end of 2015, following six years at the helm.

The move comes less than a month after the Anglo-Dutch oil major abandoned its 80,000 barrel per day Carmon Creek thermal oil sands project in Alberta, amid a reshuffle of the firm’s portfolio.

A spokesman for Shell Canada said Mitchelmore’s departure had nothing to do with the decision to shelve Carmon Creek.

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HERE FIRST TEN DAYS AGO: Lorraine Mitchelmore Fired

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Michael Crothers at Shell E&P Ireland Limited

By John Donovan

On 7 November, we published the first news of the firing of Lorraine Mitchelmore, the President and Country Chair of Shell Canada.

The information, which came from a Shell insider source, was posted on our Shell Blog under the alias of “Manny”

The departure of Lorraine Mitchelmore has been confirmed today by the mainstream media, 10 days later.

She claims that she was not sacked, but stepped down to spend more time with her children. 

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Lorraine Mitchelmore, head of Shell’s Canadian division, stepping down

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The Canadian Press

Published Monday, November 16, 2015 4:00PM EST

CALGARY — The head of Royal Dutch Shell’s Canadian operations is leaving her job at the end of this year.

Lorraine Mitchelmore has been Shell Canada’s president and country chair for past six years and has led the global energy giant’s heavy oil business for three.

Mitchelmore says she decided to move on in order to spend more time with her two daughters, the youngest of whom is in Grade 6.

She says her next career steps will involve contributing to Canada’s prosperity by serving on select boards.

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Shell plans to retain four senior BG executives after merger – memo

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Business News | London Mon Nov 16, 2015

Royal Dutch Shell plans to retain four members of BG Group’s executive team after the companies’ planned merger next year, according to an internal memo seen by Reuters on Monday.

The memo indicates that the planned $70 billion takeover of BG by Shell remains on track. Shell this month sought to ease investor concerns over the deal by announcing costs cuts and benefits that would make it work despite lower oil prices.

According to the Shell document, BG’s Chief Operating Officer Sami Iskander will become executive vice president for joint ventures. Executive Vice President for Global Energy Marketing and Shipping Steve Hill will be named executive vice president for gas and energy marketing and trading while BG General Counsel Tom Melbye Eide will become general counsel for upstream.

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Are the Oil Sands Going Bust?

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Screen Shot 2015-09-17 at 07.55.40Written by Keith KohlPosted November 12, 2015 at 6:51PM

After backing out of an Arctic drilling program, Shell is taking yet another hit by leaving the Canadian oil-sands in Alberta.

To put it simply: the losses were too great.

There was no way Shell would have been able to stay competitive, so it decided to opt out, taking a $2 billion hit in the process.

As you know, the slump in crude oil prices since the summer of 2014 has caused energy companies to re-think upcoming projects.

Shell’s absence leaves at least 18 future projects on hold.

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Shell share price: Company not giving up on oil sands

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by Veselin ValchevWednesday, 11 Nov 2015

Royal Dutch Shell Plc (LON:RDSA) boss Ben van Beurden said last week that the withdrawal from the Carmon Creek thermal oil sands project in Alberta, Canada, does not mean that the Anglo-Dutch oil major has given up on oil sands in general.

Shell’s chief executive noted that the company rates investment opportunities on a project-by-project basis. In contrast to Carmon Creek needing oil prices at about $70 per barrel to break even, van Beurden remarked that Shell’s Fort McMurray oil sands project has operational costs of only $25 per barrel.

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Shell CEO says company committed to oilsands despite Carmon Creek decision

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LAUREN KRUGEL, THE CANADIAN PRESS: November 10, 2015

FORT SASKATCHEWAN — The CEO of Royal Dutch Shell Plc says a decision to back away from its Carmon Creek oilsands project last month does not mean it’s backing away from the oilsands in general.

Ben van Beurden told reporters last week that his company ranks investment opportunities in its global portfolio project-by-project, not region-by-region — so the whole industry cannot be painted with the same brush as the halted 80,000-barrel-a-day Carmon Creek project in northwestern Alberta.

More important than its upfront cost was the project’s “resilience” under a variety of different scenarios, said van Beurden.

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Screen Shot 2015-09-17 at 07.55.40DAVID HOWELL, EDMONTON JOURNAL: November 6, 2015

Fort Saskatchewan — Shell and its partners Friday opened the $1.35-billion Quest carbon capture and storage project.

It is designed to capture and store more than one million tonnes of carbon-dioxide emissions a year from the bitumen upgrader at Scotford.

Built with financial help from the Alberta and federal governments, Quest is the world’s first oilsands CCS project. Shell says it can reduce CO2 emissions from the upgrader by up to 35 per cent, an amount equal to the annual emissions of 250,000 cars.

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Keystone rejection tied to climate inaction frustration-Shell CEO

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Markets | Fri Nov 6, 2015 3:38pm EST

By Mike De Souza

Nov 6 (Reuters) – The U.S. rejection of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline was driven in part by protesters who are increasingly frustrated with inaction on climate change, Royal Dutch Shell Plc Chief Executive Ben van Beurden said on Friday.

Speaking at the launch of Shell’s new carbon capture and storage project in Alberta, the first Canadian project of its kind in the oil sands industry, van Beurden said anti-fossil-fuel movements are growing because of anxiety and resentment about a failure to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

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Shell Canada says Keystone XL was already in uncertainty window

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Shell Canada says Keystone XL was already in uncertainty window

Screen Shot 2015-10-28 at 08.03.29CALGARY: Fri Nov 6, 2015

Royal Dutch Shell PLc said on Friday there are at least three other possible pipeline alternatives to TransCanada Corp’s Keystone XL project, which was rejected by U.S. President Barack Obama, and Shell would like to see at least one approved.

“So Keystone has been on for seven years now, so of course, it’s brought into the uncertainty window,” Lorraine Mitchelmore, president of Shell’s Canadian unit, told reporters in Calgary.

(Reporting by Mike De Souza in Calgary; Editing by Chizu Nomiyama)

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Shell Canada and Nova Scotia petroleum board quizzed on oil spill risks

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Shell Canada and Nova Scotia petroleum board quizzed on oil spill risks

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By Jennifer Henderson, CBC News: 5 Nov 2015

Executives from Shell Canada and Nova Scotia’s Offshore Petroleum Board were quizzed this week by the legislature’s resource committee on the oil company’s plans in the event of a blowout at an offshore drilling site near Shelburne. 

“We feel privileged that we’ve been allowed to drill exploration wells in Nova Scotia but we take our responsibilities extremely seriously and we are very focused on ensuring that a spill doesn’t happen,” said Christine Pagan, Shell’s Atlantic Canada venture manager.

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Shell Canada carbon capture likely last to get Alberta subsidies

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Screen Shot 2015-09-17 at 07.55.40CALGARY, ALBERTA | BY MIKE DE SOUZACommodities | Thu Nov 5, 2015 9:01pm GMT

Royal Dutch Shell’s launch on Friday of Canada’s first oil sands project to capture and bury carbon emissions – assisted by generous public subsidies – will likely be the last to get such funding, the Alberta government said this week.

The left-leaning New Democratic government of the energy-rich Western Canadian province, home to the country’s controversial oil sands, said it no longer plans to fund future efforts using the technology.

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Shell update on BG takeover stokes fears for North Sea jobs

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The update fuelled fears about the implications for the North Sea, where Shell and BG have around 2,800 staff and contractors working in total. Both have big operations centres in Aberdeen. The company has shed 7,500 posts globally this year in response to the crude price plunge. It has cut 500 North Sea jobs since August last year.

MARK WILLIAMSON / Wednesday 4 November 2015 / Business

ROYAL Dutch Shell has highlighted the potential it sees to slash costs following the planned $70 (£45bn) billion takeover of BG in comments that stoked concern about the likely impact on jobs in the North Sea.

The deal will increase the size of Shell’s business in the North Sea where the oil and gas giant may then make significant cuts as directors try to achieve the returns they are targeting.

In an update on strategy, Shell said it has increased its estimate of the synergies it will be able to squeeze out of the enlarged business by $1bn since the deal was announced in April, to $3.5bn.

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Shell’s boss fights to keep BG deal alive as he attempts to calm jittery investors

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By LAURA CHESTERS FOR DAILY MAIL: 3 November 2015

Royal Dutch Shell chief executive Ben van Beurden is the oil industry’s equivalent of a swan – below his calm demeanour he is furiously paddling to keep his planned £40billion mega-deal afloat.

Shell is buying rival BG Group and, to get the deal away and for it to make sense as the oil price plummets, van Beurden has taken the knife to Shell’s costs and projects.

Investors have been getting jittery as the price of oil has halved since summer 2014 and has stubbornly remained below $60 a barrel since the takeover was announced in April. Brent Crude continues to fluctuate but experts predict the price will stay ‘lower for longer’ than may have been expected.

However, van Beurden, who took on the top job last January and has a lot riding personally on the deal, promises it will still work with an oil price in the mid-$60s a barrel. Yesterday he insisted: ‘Although oil prices have fallen in 2015, the valuation case for the BG acquisition still looks compelling today for both sets of shareholders.’

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Shell carves more savings from BG Group deal, expects further job cuts

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Posted on November 3, 2015 | By Collin Eaton

HOUSTON — Shell has found another $1 billion in costs it could shake free after it buys BG Group, company officials said Tuesday, partly in response to critics of the huge acquisition Shell announced when crude was more expensive in the spring.

The cuts would mean more job losses on top of the 7,500 in layoffs Shell has announced this year, but officials declined to say how many jobs would be affected or lost.

The value of Shell’s original $70 billion offer for the British gas producer, which is known for its prized Brazilian deep-water fields and its big liquefied natural gas business, fell to $56 billion a month ago and edged back up to about $60 billion as Shell’s share price and crude prices have fallen. Shell had proposed to pay for the deal mostly with shares.

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Shell share price: Oil major sells downstream assets

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by Veselin ValchevMonday, 02 Nov 2015

Royal Dutch Shell Plc (LON:RDSA) announced today that it has completed the sale of two assets from its downstream portfolio as part of its strategy to divest lower-margin businesses, as profits wane amid the depressed oil price.

The Hague-based oil major has completed the sale of its Butagaz liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) business in France to DCC Energy for €464 million (£332 million).

The sale follows a binding offer received by Shell in May, in addition to consultation with staff and regulatory approval, the company noted.

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Shell’s Loss: Oil Prices Aren’t the Only Problem

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There is blood in the water at Royal Dutch Shell

By HELEN THOMAS: Oct. 29, 2015 

There is blood in the water at Royal Dutch Shell. The wound will take some time to heal. The U.K. oil and gas company Thursday posted a huge third-quarter loss, dragged down by impairments of $8.2 billion in its upstream business. Just less than half the charges owed to Shell reducing its view of longer-term oil and gas prices by an unspecified amount. The remainder was write-offs resulting from its decision to cease drilling in the Arctic and call a halt to a Canadian oil sands project.

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In defence of Shell CEO Ben van Beurden

By a regular contributor

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Only one member of the EC is directly involved in North American activities, Marvin Odum. 

Perhaps worth noting is that investment decisions on the scale of the recent Shell write-offs would have required approval by the entire EC in the Hague long before BvB was around. Few of the EC members who made those decisions are still present. 

It seems strange that so many of the huge projects which have been abandoned are in North America, and serious questions need to be asked about why approval was given by the EC for these huge projects. Only one member of the EC is directly involved in North American activities, Marvin Odum. 

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Royal Dutch Shell’s share price tumbles as group posts dramatic loss as falling oil prices take toll

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Screen Shot 2015-10-29 at 08.02.52by Catherine Neilan: 29 Oct 2015

Royal Dutch Shell’s share price tumbled this morning after it revealed a third quarter loss of $7.4bn (£4.8bn) as the company gets to grips with the falling oil price. 

The figures

The Anglo-Dutch oil giant posted its dramatic loss on the back of nearly $8bn-worth of exceptional items. Adjusted net income fell to $1.77bn, missing expectations that had put the figure at $2.92bn. 

Shell posted a CCS earnings loss of $6.12bn, 216 per cent lower than the same time last year. 

Cash flow from operating activities for the third quarter 2015 was $11.2bn, down from $12.8bn for the same quarter last year.  Meanwhile gearing has increased to 12.7 per cent, up from 11.7 per cent at the same point in 2014.   

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Low Oil Prices Take a Toll on Royal Dutch Shell in Quarter

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Screen Shot 2015-10-29 at 08.02.52By STANLEY REED: OCT. 29, 2015

LONDON — Lower petroleum prices took a big toll on Royal Dutch Shell in the third quarter.

The company reported a loss of $7.4 billion, compared with a profit of $4.5 billion in the quarter a year earlier. Adjusted for inventory changes and one-time items — a more closely watched measurement — earnings fell 70 percent to $1.8 billion.

The company took about $7.9 billion in write-offs for its recently halted exploration venture off Alaska, a canceled heavy-oil project in Canada and other operations.

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Shell halts construction on new Alberta oil sands project

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CALGARY, ALBERTA: Tue Oct 27, 2015

Royal Dutch Shell Plc will not continue construction of its 80,000 barrel per day Carmon Creek thermal oil sands project in northern Alberta because of the lack of infrastructure to move Canadian crude to market, the company said on Tuesday.

Shell said the decision to halt the project was also the result of “current uncertainties” and chief executive Ben van Beurden said the company was having to manage costs in today’s low oil price environment.

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Shell cancels big Canadian oil sands project

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Posted on October 27, 2015 | By Collin Eaton

HOUSTON – Royal Dutch Shell says it will stop building a large Canadian oil sands project after low crude prices pushed it out of the company’s shortlist of profitable projects.

It’s the second large project Shell has canceled since August, when it ditched a $7 billion effort to drill for oil in the Arctic Ocean north of Alaska. Shell said Tuesday its Carmon Creek project in Alberta, which was expected to pump 80,000 barrels of crude a day, was sanctioned in late 2013 when oil prices were still hovering around $100 a barrel.

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Screen Shot 2015-10-26 at 21.23.40Energy giant will take a $2 billion write-down; cites uncertain business environment

“We are making changes to Shell’s portfolio mix by reviewing our longer-term upstream options world-wide, and managing affordability and exposure in the current world of lower oil prices. This is forcing tough choices at Shell,” Ben van Beurden, Royal Dutch Shell’s chief executive, said in a statement.

FULL ARTICLE

Shell Takes $2 Billion Charge to Quit Oil-Sands Project

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Screen Shot 2015-09-17 at 07.55.40David Marino: 27 October 2015

  • Company stops work at Carmon Creek facility in Alberta

  • Halted oil-sands work follows Shell’s Arctic drilling exit

Royal Dutch Shell Plc made its second major strategic change in two months, announcing it will take a $2 billion charge to exit an oil-sands project in Alberta.

Shell is stopping construction on the 80,000 barrel-a-day Carmon Creek facility, the company said in a statement on its website Tuesday. The charge will be recorded in third-quarter earnings, which are due to be released Thursday.

The cancellation comes a month after Shell said it would stop drilling in the Arctic, where it spent $7 billion searching for oil. Shell is among several companies pulling back spending as oil prices linger below $50 a barrel, less than half of their 2014 high.

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