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Posts under ‘BG Group’

Can we still be sure of Shell?

Screen Shot 2016-08-19 at 09.42.13By Kevin Godbold – Friday, 19 August, 2016

Our investing forefathers used to trot out the maxim ‘never sell Shell’. Years ago, Shell was a fast-growing business in a fast-growing market, so holding on to Shell shares indefinitely made more sense back then than it does now.   

Today, Royal Dutch Shell (LSE: RDSB) is a mature business in a mature market and its fortunes tend to ebb and flow with the undulations of wider macroeconomic cycles. Adopting a long-term buy-and-hold strategy for Shell now seems inappropriate.

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Shell advises JPMorgan to sell $1bn NZ oil portfolio

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BRIDGET CARTERMergers & Acquisitions Editor, Sydney

GRETCHEN FRIEMANNMergers & Acquisitions Editor, Sydney

19 August 2016

Shell has called on investment bank JPMorgan to offload its $1 billion-plus portfolio of oil exploration and production assets in New Zealand, with some analysts questioning whether Australian players will express interest in the offering.

It comes as part of a global selldown by the oil and gas giant, which signalled a retreat from various markets, amid a $US30bn ($39bn) global asset sale plan following its $US50bn takeover of BG Group.

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Cash flow problems at Shell?

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By Roland Head – Wednesday, 17 August, 2016

Oil and gas giants Royal Dutch Shell (LSE: RDSB) and (LSE: BP) have been among the top performers in the FTSE 100 so far this year. Shell stock is worth 31% more than at the start of January, while BP is up 23%.

But these gains don’t seem to reflect the weak state of the oil market or both companies’ rapidly-growing debt piles. Are investors turning a blind eye to the risk of a dividend cut in pursuit of the 7% yields available on both stocks?

Cash flow problems at Shell?

Shell’s interim results showed that the firm’s net debt has rocketed from $25.9bn one year ago to $75.1bn today. Much of this is due to the BG acquisition. I expect Shell to be able to refinance a lot of BG’s debt at much lower interest rates than those paid by BG.

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European energy groups press on with multibillion-dollar disposals

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Andrew Ward, Energy Editor: August 7, 2016

Extracts relating to Shell…

Royal Dutch Shell says it is working on 17 potential disposals as it seeks to reassure investors that its target for $30bn of asset sales by 2018 is achievable.

This balancing act is especially tricky for Shell as disposals are crucial to reduce debts after its £35bn takeover of BG Group, completed in February.

“Shell is going to have to be flexible on price if it is to move forward with some of these deals,” said one energy banker. “They cannot just sit back and wait for oil prices to come back.”

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Crude Slump Sees Oil Majors’ Debt Burden Double to $138 Billion

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Screen Shot 2016-07-29 at 16.46.22“On the debt, it may go up before it comes back down,” Shell Chief Financial Officer Simon Henry told investors last week. “And the major factor is the oil price.”

By Javier Blas: August 5, 2016

When commodity prices crashed in late 2014, oil executives could look at their mining counterparts with a sense of superiority.

Back then, the world’s biggest oil companies enjoyed relatively strong balance sheets, with little borrowing relative to the value of their assets. Miners entered the slump in a very different state and some of the world’s largest — Rio Tinto Plc, Anglo American Plc and Glencore Plc — had to reduce dividends and employ draconian spending cuts to bring their debt under control.

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SHELL TAX THEFT

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UPDATED: POSTINGS ON SHELL BLOG FRIDAY 5 AUGUST 2016

Dutchdude 2016/08/05 at 3:03 pm

A few weeks ago there were some posts about Shell pocketing the tax relief of those taking the severance package. I had expected a bit more comments on this? Is the principle of tax not that it goes to the government? Since when do we allow companies to impose their own tax? Apart from the unfairness to the employees who worked for this and made sacrifices, it feels incorrect and arrogant. Tax should go to the government and tax relief to the person who is entitled to it. It should not be allowed to be taken away by unscrupulous HR staff. If there is a reader here who works for the government tax department please raise this with your employer (UK, Holland, …). I bet that each severance employee rather pays tax to his government than to Shell.

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Is Royal Dutch Shell plc’s dividend living on borrowed time?

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By Harvey Jones – Friday, 5 August, 2016

All good things come to an end, and I’m afraid this old saying is increasingly likely to apply to today’s sky-high dividend paid by Royal Dutch Shell (LSE: RDSB).

Unsure of Shell

The oil major has a proud record of raising its dividend every year since the Second World War, but that record surely can’t last much longer. Shell faces a different type of global threat these days as the after-effects of the financial crisis continue to rumble on (or even intensify), and the oil price plunges once again.

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Shell share price: Analysts flag concerns over group’s debt pile

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by Mary MorleyTuesday, 02 Aug 2016, 10:38 BST

The latest fall in oil prices has revived concerns about Royal Dutch Shell’s (LON:RDSA) debt pile, analysts at RBC have said. The comments follow the oil major’s second-quarter results last week when the Anglo-Dutch group posted a hefty drop in profits.

Shell’s share price has fallen into negative territory in today’s session, tracking crude lower. As of 10:09 BST, the shares were changing hands 1.85 percent in the red at 1,853.50p, underperforming the benchmark FTSE 100 index which currently stands 0.77 percent lower at 6,642.68 points. The group’s shares have been little changed over the past year, and are up by more than a fifth in the year-to-date.

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Shell slips as concern shifts to debt pile

Screen Shot 2016-08-01 at 21.59.50Bryce Elder: August 1, 2016 6:40 pm

With oil at three-month lows, concerns about Royal Dutch Shell ’s debt burden left it among Monday’s biggest fallers.

RBC said that while investors had become more comfortable with Shell’s purchase of BG, the weak oil price had shifted attention to Shell’s $75bn of net debt and its reliance on disposals.

FULL ARTICLE

How Exxon Mobil, Royal Dutch Shell, BP Are Affected by Low Oil Prices

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By Muhammad Ali Khawar on Aug 1, 2016 at 7:57 am EST

Just when you thought oil prices will rebound they got even worse. The last few weeks have been quite eventful for the oil and gas industry, with companies releasing their second-quarter earnings. The quarter hasn’t been as rewarding for integrated oil and gas majors.

The decline in crude oil price has persisted for quite a while now. West Texas Intermediate was down 0.50% at $41.40 per barrel, while Brent Crude was down 0.32% at $43.39 per barrel, earlier today.

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Royal Dutch Shell stake in Woodside Petroleum ‘held for sale’

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by Angela Macdonald-Smith: July 29 2016

Royal Dutch Shell looks to be heading for an exit from Woodside Petroleum sooner rather than later, after reclassifying its remaining $3 billion stake in the Australian oil and gas producer as an “asset for sale”.

The move appears to be driven by technical reasons because of Shell’s reduced representation on Woodside’s board. But at the same time it may signal a firmer intention to dispose of the circa 13 per cent stake, which Shell has for some time declared as a non-strategic holding.

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Shell’s Debt Nears Edge of Comfort Zone as Rout Boosts Borrowing

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Net debt increased to a record $75 billion at the end of June from $70 billion three months earlier, Shell said Thursday as it reported a slump in second-quarter earnings. Additional borrowing drove up the ratio of net debt to capital, or gearing, to 28.1 percent — more than double the year-earlier level.

“We’re close to the maximum level and it could go up still with the oil price where it is,” Chief Financial Officer Simon Henry said on a conference call. “Thirty percent is an upper limit to where we can describe our position as comfortable.”

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Royal Dutch Shell may have to slash its dividend – analysts Share

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17:00 28 Jul 2016

Investors in Royal Dutch Shell PLC (LON:RDSB) should be steeling themselves for an eventual cut in their dividend payouts, according to analysts.

In half-year results on Thursday, the Anglo-Dutch company held its interim dividend steady, at 47 cents, despite underlying earnings for the quarter falling 72% to US$1bn.

Its gas and downstream businesses fuelled earnings, more than outweighing a US$2bn loss in the upstream division, which faced one-off charges of US$649mln.

But shares in the group fell 53.5p, or 2.5%, to 2051.5p.

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Dividend At Risk – Royal Dutch Shell

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Summary

Shell produced a meager $3B of operating Cashflow for H1 2016.

Cash Commitments for Capex, Debt and Dividends were about $20B.

Shell does not stack up until an oil recovery to $80 IMO.

Introduction

Royal Dutch Shell (NYSE:RDS.A) (NYSE:RDS.B) released results this morning in Europe. Both the London and Amsterdam listings are down 4%. RDS is yielding about 7% this morning at current prices in Amsterdam.

Let’s get the disclosure bit over with. I was long Shell up until a few months ago. I sold as its share price recovered from the January meltdown. Having analyzed the company several times on SA, I concluded I was not comfortable holding the stock. Of course, if I had continued to hold and sold now, I would have made a much better return at today’s prices.

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Shell: Paradise Postponed

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PHOTOGRAPHER: ANDREY RUDAKOV

By Chris Hughes: July 28, 2016

Royal Dutch Shell has delivered a shock.

Weeks after cheering investors with a big plan for living within its means, the oil major’s second-quarter earnings plummeted from $3.4 billion to $239 million. Paradise — a cash-generative company driven by February’s $64 billion acquisition of BG Group — has been postponed.

So much for the benefits of BG. This was the first set of numbers to include a full contribution for the acquisition, and so far the deal has pushed indebtedness higher while introducing a raft of one-off integration costs.

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Shell focusing on ‘lasting changes’

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THE HAGUE, Netherlands, July 28 (UPI) — Lower crude oil prices continue to present problems for the industry and Shell is now focused on retooling efforts, the chief executive officer said.

“We are making significant and lasting changes to Shell’s working practices and cost structure,” CEO Ben van Buerden said in a statement.

Shell, moving through the year after a merger with British energy company BG Group, said net income during the second quarter fell more than 70 percent to $1.18 billion. The company attributed the decline in part to some of the fiscal pressures from its $7 billion tie-up with BG Group, weak industry conditions and tougher tax regimes.

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Shell misses expectations with 70 percent earnings plunge

Screen Shot 2016-07-28 at 08.37.58By REUTERS: PUBLISHED: 08:16, 28 July 2016

By Karolin Schaps and Dmitry Zhdannikov

LONDON, July 28 (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell reported a more than 70 percent fall in quarterly profit on Thursday, well below analyst estimates, blaming weak oil prices, poor refining profits and higher charges resulting from its $54 billion acquisition of BG Group.

Shell’s current cost of supplies — its definition of net income — came to $1 billion in the second quarter, compared with analyst expectations of $2.2 billion and $3.8 billion achieved the same time last year.

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Shell profit falls 93% amid low oil prices

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The quarter was the first full one that included BG Group PLC, which Shell bought in a roughly $50 billion acquisition that completed in February.

“Downstream and integrated gas businesses contributed strongly to the results, alongside Shell’s self-help program. However, lower oil prices continue to be a significant challenge across the business, particularly in the upstream,” said Shell Chief Executive Ben van Beurden.

FULL ARTICLE

2 Red Flags on Royal Dutch Shell’s Cash Flow Statement

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Reuben Gregg BrewerJul 22, 2016 at 1:16PM

Royal Dutch Shell (NYSE:RDS-A) (NYSE:RDS-B) has been hit just as hard by the oil industry downturn as any other oil major. So far, though, it’s managed to keep its dividend intact. Still, the company’s cash flow statement bears watching, because keeping that dividend going is getting harder to pull off. Here are two red flags to watch on Royal Dutch Shell’s cash flow statement.   

Cash flow, not earnings

Shell’s earnings cratered following the mid-2014 oil price drop, going from around $3.00 a share in 2014 to just $0.60 or so last year. (Note that the U.S. traded ADRs represent two shares of Shell stock, so these figures and all of the other per share numbers in the text, which are based on one share of stock, may be half of what you expect to see if you own the ADR.) In the first quarter of this year, the integrated oil giant only earned about a dime a share. Clearly, things aren’t going well for Shell’s business right now. That’s understandable, since oil and natural gas prices play a big part in the company’s results, but there are implications to the bottom-line decline.  

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Is Gas The Future? Shell Seems To Think So

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By Gregory Brew – Jul 20, 2016

The world’s second largest private oil company sees a new future, and it’s not in oil.

Shell has made a concerted effort to shift the bulk of its business from oil-related projects to natural gas, LNG and renewables. Coming on the heels of its February purchase of BG Group (a $54 billion acquisition), Shell has organized a division focused solely on renewable energy. It announced new investment for its LNG facility on Curtis Island in Australia, where natural gas has enjoyed $180 billion in new capital. It has emerged as a stronger voice on global climate change than its competitor ExxonMobil and the company’s website proposes a number of “Shell Scenarios” that could allow for a growing energy market while creating less CO2.

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Royal Dutch Shell: Huge Dividend And Long-Term Growth Ahead

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Wayne Duggan: 20 July 2016

A number of British stocks have been hit hard since the referendum vote to leave the EU, but Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A, RDS.B) is not one of them. Shares are now up 0.3% since the Brexit vote after initially falling more than 8% during the knee-jerk market sell-off.

With the possibility that the Brexit could severely impact British GDP growth in coming years, RDS.B offers a unique opportunity to invest in a company within a sector that is in a global upswing, a company that has significant international exposure and a company that is committed to maintaining the single largest dividend payment in the MSCI World Index.

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JOHN DONOVAN SAR APPLICATION LETTER TO SHELL INTERNATIONAL LIMITED UNDER THE DATA PROTECTION ACT 1998

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LINK TO ARTICLE

Screen Shot 2016-07-20 at 10.23.39JOHN DONOVAN SAR APPLICATION LETTER TO SHELL INTERNATIONAL LIMITED UNDER THE DATA PROTECTION ACT 1998

19 July 2016

Mr. Gary Thomson SI-LSC/K
Shell International Limited
40 Bank Street
London E14 5NR

Dear Mr Thomson

Data Protection Act 1998 – Subject Access Request (SAR)

Thank you for your email dated 19 July 2016.

Please find enclosed completed application forms together with a postal order for £10 made out to Royal Dutch Shell Plc.

I obtained it before finding out that the fee can now instead be paid to a charity.

As you are aware, I operate royaldutchshellplc.com – a website focussed on the activities of Shell.

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The Future of Big Oil? At Shell, It’s Not Oil

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Screen Shot 2016-07-20 at 07.42.44The energy giant is shifting to gas as the industry adapts to climate change.

By Matthew CampbellRakteem Katakey and James Paton: 20 July 2016

At Australia’s Curtis Island, you can see Big Oil morphing into Big Gas. Just off the continent’s rugged northeastern coast lies a 667-acre liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminal owned by Royal Dutch Shell, an engineering feat of staggering complexity. Gas from more than 2,500 wells travels hundreds of miles by pipeline to the island, where it’s chilled and pumped into 10-story-high tanks before being loaded onto massive ships. “We’re more a gas company than an oil company,” says Ben van Beurden, Shell’s chief executive officer. “If you have to place bets, which we have to, I’d rather place them there.”

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Royal Dutch Shell: Does Everything Come Down to Oil Price Recovery?

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By Staff Writer on Jul 19, 2016 at 9:07 am EST

World’s leading integrated oil and gas company, Royal Dutch Shell plc (ADR) (NYSE:RDS.A), concluded a deal to acquire BG not too long ago. The move was widely perceived as an aggressive step to become a dominant supplier of liquefied natural gas (LNG) across the globe. The deal is expected to help Shell diversify its operations and enable it to benefit from cost synergies in the years to come.

The merger came at a time when oil prices were on a downward trajectory, with the step expected to drive the company out of the downturn. Oil prices that were once above $110 per barrel have now plunged below $50. Last year, when the Dutch company announced the deal, many mergers and acquisition pundits criticized Shell’s willingness to pay 50% premium in a depressed crude oil environment.

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Getting Ready for Another Round of Commodity Market Downturn

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By Staff Writer on Jul 18, 2016 at 7:30 am EST

Crude oil prices have dropped below the $50 per barrel mark yet again after hitting their highest level in 2016 last month. US crude benchmark, West Texas Intermediate (WTI) is trading at $45.97 per barrel while Brent is trading at $47.69 per barrel in European Markets today. The global crude oil benchmark reached as high as $52.51 per barrel earlier in June.

Although oil prices have recovered some momentum after touching 12-year lows of $27 per barrel earlier in 2016, it still has a lot of ground to gain before reaching summer-2014 levels. Oil market showed some positive gains in June when oil prices crossed the psychological barrier of $50 per barrel. However, it was short-lived as it is currently trading below $48 per barrel.

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Shell with a full tank of debt

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By JACK HOUGH: JULY 16, 2016

A dash of desperation is working wonders for module article chiclet Royal Dutch Shell. The price of Brent crude oil has fallen by half in two years, pulling Shell’s cash flow from operations well below what it typically needs to pay its dividend and fund exploration. Meanwhile, the purchase of United Kingdom gas specialist BG Group, completed in February, left Shell with a full tank of debt.

Something had to give. Investors braced for a dividend cut, which is why the American depositary receipts (ticker: RDS.B) started the year priced low enough to yield 8%. But rather than reduce its payout, Shell slashed spending on projects and sold low-return businesses. Last month, it announced a capital plan through 2020 that calls for more asset sales and a limit on capital spending.

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Royal Dutch Shell Vs BP plc: Who’s Better Equipped to Tackle the Downturn?

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By Muhammad Ali Khawar on Jul 15, 2016 at 10:04 am EST

Royal Dutch Shell plc. (ADR) (NYSE:RDS.A) finally closed its $52 billion merger with BG group in February. The deal is considered as one of the largest mergers in the oil and gas sector and is expected to help Shell diversify its operations and benefit from cost synergies.

The Shell-BG merger comes at a time when oil prices have plummeted significantly. Oil prices that once traded over $110 per barrel have now tumbled to as low as $50 per barrel. Last year, when Shell approached BG for the first time, many criticized the deal especially because of the 50% premium Shell was willing to pay in a depressed crude environment.

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S&P trims rating on oil major

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by Tsveta ZikolovaWednesday, 13 Jul 2016, 14:09 BST

Standard & Poor’s has trimmed its rating on Royal Dutch Shell (LON:RDSA), the Financial Times has reported. The move has been prompted by the group’s £35-billion takeover of former smaller London-listed peer BG Group completed earlier this year.

Shell’s share price has been little changed in today’s session, having lost 0.07 percent to stand at 2,106.00p as of 13:25 BST. The shares are marginally underperforming the broader London market, with the benchmark FTSE 100 index having inched 0.12 percent higher to 6,688.62 points. Shell’s shares have gained nearly 16 percent over the past year, and are up just under 38 percent in the year-to-date.

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S&P cuts Shell rating on BG takeover

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12 July 2016

Shell’s credit rating has been cut by S&P because of its £35bn takeover of rival BG Group.

The rating agency said on Tuesday evening it would cut the international oil company from A+ to A.

S&P said in a statement:

The downgrade reflects our view that, despite management’s commitment to reduce debt after the $54 billion acquisition of BG Group, Shell’s credit metrics and discretionary cash flow will remain materially below levels commensurate with the previous ‘A+’ rating in 2016 and 2017, as we expect continuing low oil and gas prices.

Earlier this year, Fitch reduced its credit rating for Shell from AA to AA-.

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BG Houston Office to Close; Lay Off 154 Workers

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According to a letter sent to the Texas Workforce Commission, BG, which became a wholly owned subsidiary of Shell February 15, 2016, will permanently close its Houston office and lay off 154 employees. The majority of employees, 118, will be laid off August 31 and the remaining 36 employees will be let go September 30.

Employees do not have bumping rights and BG will offer severance benefits and outplacement services to laid-off employees.

In January, Shell CEO Ben van Beurden said the acquisition would result in a total workforce reduction of 10,000 workers across both companies. Shell has also stated the company will close BG’s head office located near London by the end of the year, Reuters reported. In addition, Shell will close BG’s Aberdeen office and its Brabazon House office in Manchester by the end of 2017.  

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UPDATE 1-Shell takes sacked UK workers overseas service tax breaks

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Tom Bergin

(Adds employee reaction, website link)

LONDON, July 7 (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell has changed its redundancy terms so it can claim tax refunds that some UK workers would otherwise have been able to claim on redundancy payments, internal documents seen by Reuters show.

The move comes as the Hague-based oil giant is slashing 5,000 jobs this year following the collapse in oil prices and its merger with smaller UK rival BG Group.

The UK government allows employees who have worked part of their career overseas to reclaim some, or in some cases all, of the tax due on severance payments.

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Shell takes sacked UK workers overseas service tax breaks

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Royal Dutch Shell has changed its redundancy terms so it can claim tax refunds that some UK workers would otherwise have been able to claim on redundancy payments, internal documents seen by Reuters show. Copies of one presentation have been published on Shell protest site: http://royaldutchshellplc.com/

By REUTERS: PUBLISHED: 17:30, 8 July 2016

By Tom Bergin

LONDON, July 7 (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell has changed its redundancy terms so it can claim tax refunds that some UK workers would otherwise have been able to claim on redundancy payments, internal documents seen by Reuters show.

The move comes as the Hague-based oil giant is slashing 5,000 jobs this year following the collapse in oil prices and its merger with smaller UK rival BG Group.

The UK government allows employees who have worked part of their career overseas to reclaim some, or in some cases all, of the tax due on severance payments.

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Exclusive – Shell CEO warns Brexit could slow $30 billion asset sale plan

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Screen Shot 2016-06-30 at 18.15.43By Ron Bousso and Freya Berry: 08/07 11:41 CET

LONDON (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell’s chief executive, Ben van Beurden, has told investors that Britain’s decision to exit the European Union could slow its $30 billion (23 billion pounds) asset sale plan, especially in the North Sea which had struggled to attract buyers for years.

The comment, made during an investor and analyst event at the Wimbledon tennis tournament this week, came as Shell mandated Bank of America Merrill Lynch to find buyers for several key assets in the North Sea, including its stake in the lucrative Buzzard oilfield, hoping the sale would raise at least $2 billion.

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Greedy Shell Takes Redundant Employees Tax Breaks

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By John Donovan

Shell has resorted to taking tax breaks intended for redundant employees in order to help maintain its dividend and ensure that senior managers involved in the BG merger vanity project keep THEIR jobs.

Employees in the UK are taxed on redundancy payments over £30k.  However, HMRC provides an exemption for employees who have worked abroad allowing them to reclaim some or all of the tax.  Despite the fact that Shell UK redundancy terms have deteriorated over recent years and are now significantly less generous than their Dutch colleagues receive, Shell UK has decided that it is entitled to the overseas employment tax breaks not the employee.

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Shell Warns Of Further Job Cuts

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Screen Shot 2016-06-30 at 18.15.43By Irina Slav – Jul 05, 2016, 9:02 AM CDT

Shell may have to cut more jobs after laying off 12,500 people over the past year, CEO Ben van Beurden told The Telegraph. The new cuts would be prompted by a “continuous improvement drive,” he added.

Elaborating on what this drive would imply, Van Beurden noted jobs are becoming unnecessary as business operations get shut down, or positions being moved to another part of the world, or becoming redundant because of the drive for enhanced business efficiency.

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Shell job losses could be worsened by Brexit vote

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Oil giant Royal Dutch Shell has warned over the possibility of further job cuts.

The risk of more job losses is a result of uncertainty caused by the UK’s vote to quit the European Union, City A.M. understands.

Since last year Shell has slashed 12,500 jobs following the fall in oil prices and its tie-up with rival BG.

At the time of Shell’s initial takeover bid for BG Group last year it had 93,000 employees. Meanwhile, BG Group’s staff numbered around 5,000.

The deal came amid a collapse in oil prices, which fell from over $115 per barrel in the summer of 2014 to as low as $27 in February this year.

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Shell boss warns more job losses at the firm could “absolutely” happen

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Written by Mark Lammey – 03/07/2016 3:17 pm

The boss at Royal Dutch Shell (LON: RDSB) has reportedly said further job losses could “absolutely” take place at the company.

Shell chief executive Ben van Beurden said in an interview with the Sunday Telegraph cuts were always a possibility in the absence of large deals being struck.

Shell is axing about 12,500 roles this year due to a combination of low oil prices and its takeover of BG Group.

In May, the firm said the headcount for its North Sea operations would drop by 475 to 1,700 as part of the reductions.

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Shell chief Ben van Beurden: ‘You cannot expect us to act against our economic interest’

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By Emily Gosden, energy editor: 2 JULY 2016 • 2:30PM

On the last Thursday in January, the day Royal Dutch Shell’s £35bn takeover of BG Group got the final seal of approval from BG shareholders, Ben van Beurden was not planning a celebration.

Shell’s chief executive was instead preparing to get on with the detailed work of integrating the two companies: some 200 senior staff from Shell and BG had been assembled in The Hague, ready to spend Friday and the weekend working out what would happen when one of the biggest deals in history finally completed.

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Shell boss taking ‘a good look’ at North Sea assets

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Friday, 1 July 2016

Royal Dutch Shell’s chief executive has told the BBC he is taking “a good look” at the company’s North Sea assets, in the light of weak oil prices.

Ben van Beurden said that some older fields might be sold and others decommissioned.

He also said the company’s dividend payout was “safe and secure”, despite tough conditions for oil companies.

With an annual payout of $15bn (£11bn), Shell is the biggest payer of dividends among UK companies.

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Royal Dutch Shell plc and Gemfields plc: the perfect resources partnership?

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By Peter Stephens – Wednesday, 29 June, 2016

With the price of oil having made a storming comeback since earlier this year, Shell (LSE: RDSB) now has a much brighter future than it did just a few months ago. Clearly, there are still challenges ahead for the oil major, with there being a very real possibility that the price of oil could come under further pressure. That’s especially the case if Brexit acts as a negative catalyst on global economic growth and demand for oil falls yet further.

However, even in such a situation, Shell remains an appealing play due to its size and scale. In fact, Shell would be likely to benefit from such a situation, since it could likely outlast most of its sector peers and emerge in a stronger position with greater market share when oil eventually recovers.

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The sustainability of Royal Dutch Shell’s dividend

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It is not quite true to say that the stock market is relying on the Royal Dutch Shell dividend, but since the oil company accounts for over a tenth of the total dividends paid by UK companies, a cut would be quite a shock. The shock would be terminal for Ben van Beurden, since the Shell CEO would have broken the promise made during the takeover of BG Group.

FULL FT ARTICLE

Royal Dutch Shell Has Served Notice – The Deepwater Drillers Are In Big Trouble

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June 23, 2016

Screen Shot 2016-05-21 at 10.18.28Summary

  • Eighteen months ago Shell was considering exiting shale plays and focusing on its deepwater and LNG opportunities.
  • Shell’s recent analyst day presentations revealed a company that is shifting its long term focus towards shale.
  • We think that going forward the offshore drilling rig companies have major long term challenges and investors need to be aware that pre-crash cash flows aren’t coming back.

For the small sliver of global oil production that U.S shale oil actually represents it certainly has been a disruptive force.

Total shale production (there is no significant amount outside of the United States) is currently somewhere around 4.5 million barrels per day.

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That is not much more than four percent of total current production which checks in at over 96 million barrels per day.

After having a look at Shell’s (NYSE:RDS.A) 2016 capital markets day presentation we think shale oil is going to become even more disruptive going forward for a select group of companies.

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Shell’s Ambitious Plan To Topple Exxon

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By Rakesh Upadhyay – Jun 22, 2016, 5:17 PM CDT

Ben Van Beurden, Chief Executive Officer of Royal Dutch Shell has laid out an ambitious plan to overtake ExxonMobil as the number one oil company in the world.

Prior to the 1990s, Shell was the leader in total shareholder returns, however, its rivals went on a deal-making spree to gain the lead, while Shell shied away from making any acquisitions. Now, Mr. Beurden believes that Shell will be able to regain its lost glory post the acquisition of the BG group.

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Shell works to simplify organization to compete with independents

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By Mella McEwen [email protected]: 22 June 2016

Too big. Too rigid. Not nimble enough.

Those are reasons why integrated oil companies could have a difficult time competing with independents in the unconventional shale plays that have led to a resurgence in the nation’s oil and gas industry.

Royal Dutch Shell, however, disagrees with that reasoning and this week held an event to reaffirm its commitment to the shales business, including its holdings in the Permian Basin.

Shell officials discussed how its recent $70 billion acquisition of the BG Group has impacted its outlook. The event was a mixer at Shell’s Drilling Automation & Remote Technology (DART) Center located on its Houston campus and was webcast and available by telephone.

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Russia’s Gazprom eyes asset swap deals with Shell, OMV by year-end

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ST PETERSBURG, RUSSIA | BY DENIS PINCHUK AND DMITRY ZHDANNIKOVMon Jun 20, 2016 8:29am EDT

Russia’s state-controlled gas giant Gazprom (GAZP.MM) could gain control over some of the assets that Shell (RDSa.L) acquired earlier this year from BG group, a senior Gazprom executive said in an interview.

Gazprom’s Deputy Chief Executive Alexander Medvedev said the BG holdings could be included in an asset swap deal between Gazprom and Shell that was announced last year. He did not say what the BG holdings were or where they were located.

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Shell puts revamped shale arm at heart of growth drive

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Having turned round its North American shale business, Royal Dutch Shell (RDSa.L) is putting so-called unconventional energy at the heart of its growth plans, and believes lessons from the revamp can be applied across the company.

Greg Guidry, head of the Anglo-Dutch group’s unconventionals business, told Reuters a drive to slash costs and streamline decision-making had put his division largely on a par with leading rivals in terms of productivity and efficiency.

And now the rest of Shell could reap the benefits too.

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Royal Dutch Shell plc (ADR) to Increase Exposure to LNG Market

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By Staff WriterJun 15, 2016

Royal Dutch Shell plc (ADR) (NYSE:RDS.A) plans to further strengthen its foothold in the liquefied natural gas (LNG) market, as according to Reuters, the company will sign the Baltic LNG project deal with Russian energy giant, Gazprom in the coming days. The multi-billion dollar deal with London-based BG Group has already increased the company’s exposure to the LNG segment.

According to news sources, Shell CEO, Ben van Beurden, will sign the deal at the International Economic Forum in St. Petersburg. Russian President, Vladimir Putin, is also expected to attend the meeting.

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Shell CEO Faces Long Haul in Bid to Pass Exxon as Top Oil Major

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By Rakteem Katakey: June 15, 2016

Royal Dutch Shell Plc Chief Executive Officer Ben Van Beurden spelled out his main goal last week — surpass Exxon Mobil Corp. to become the best-performing oil major. 

“I am determined to get us to that number one place,” he said after outlining the company’s long-term strategy in London. “I want to create a world class investment case for Shell and our shareholders.” 

There are signs Van Beurden is winning over some investors following his record $54 billion acquisition of BG Group Plc. Shell has closed the gap on Exxon for total shareholder returns, which accounts for share prices, dividend payouts and buybacks, after lagging behind for five years. Still, the Anglo-Dutch explorer trails its U.S. rival on a range of other metrics from return on capital and assets to cash flow.

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Coming wave of gas puts focus on finding new shores

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Screen Shot 2016-06-06 at 10.26.15LONDON | BY RON BOUSSO AND OLEG VUKMANOVIC: Sun Jun 12, 2016

Energy giants such as Royal Dutch Shell and Total are looking to build terminals and power plants in new markets to soak up the industry’s rapidly burgeoning supply.

Companies have invested billions in plants to produce liquefied natural gas (LNG) in places such as Australia and the United States.

But gas demand growth is slowing, prices are down and the LNG volumes companies are set to produce will exceed those even major buyers such as China and Japan can absorb.

That has turned attention to the downstream market and opportunities to create new markets from Ivory Coast to remote Indonesian islands by building gas-fired power plants, pipelines, regasification and storage terminals.

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Waiting for Big Oil to clean up its act

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Screen Shot 2016-06-11 at 22.29.07By Jillian Ambrose

11 JUNE 2016 • 7:22PM

“The world is going to have to continue using fossil fuels, whether they like it or not.” There’s little disguising the defiance in the words of Exxonmobil chief Rex Tillerson.

In a Dallas concert hall, less than six months after the historic global climate deal in Paris, the long-standing leader of the world’s largest listed oil company locked horns with shareholders in an increasingly familiar battle for Big Oil.

For years, placard-wielding green activists have raised warnings that echo the financial collapse: a “carbon bubble” could leave markets reeling as trillions of dollars’ worth of existing fossil fuel assets become worthless in a low-carbon world.

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