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Shell espionage firm opens spy nest in New York

Activists campaigning against Shell’s plans to drill in the Arctic Ocean may be concerned at this development.

18 September 2011

By John Donovan

Hakluyt, the London corporate intelligence firm, which has been closely associated with Royal Dutch Shell, has recently opened a bureau in New York.

Titled Shell directors have been major shareholders in Haklut & Company Limited and were at one time the ultimate spymasters heading the company and an associated oversight foundation.

Ian Forbes McCredie OBE, the former/current MI6 senior official, who until December 2010 headed up Shell Corporate Security, has recently returned to the Hakluyt/MI6 spy nest.

Shell has used Hakluyt to carry out sinister undercover operations against its perceived enemies, including Greenpeace and Body Shop.

A Hakluyt operative, a serving German secret service agent working on a freelance basis, also carried out an elaborate operation in Nigeria directed against friends of Ken Saro-Wiwa, the activist leader hanged by the corrupt Nigerian regime armed by Shell.

SHELL CONNECTION WITH HAKLUYT & COMPANY LIMITED – THE EVIDENCE

Activists campaigning against Shell’s plans to drill in the Arctic Ocean may be concerned at this development. Shell has used a private security firm to intimidate activists campaigning against the Corrib Gas Project in Ireland.

Shell has a track record of being involved in corporate espionage in the USA.

On 12 September 2001, under the headline: “No Secret’s Safe From These Sharp Eyes”, The New York Times published an article focused on corporate “cloak-and-dagger escapades”. Mr Stephen J. Wade, an executive of Shell International Exploration and Production, a Royal Dutch/Shell Group business, was revealed as being a “competitive intelligence analyst — management-speak for corporate America’s equivalent of a spy”. The report said that Mr. Wade “uses every trick in the book” and “may even dish out erroneous information…” Mr Wade was quoted as commenting: It isn’t James Bond. The article went on to say: “Still, like any good spy, Mr. Wade declined to give detailed examples of information gleaned this way”. It also pointed out that corporate spying “sometimes skirts ethical bounds”.

In October 2010, we broke the story: “U.S. Dept. of Defense Confirms NCIS Espionage Investigation of Shell

We have also reported that Shell has infiltrated agents into host governments and for good measure is also spying globally on its own employees.

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