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Oil price drops to three-month low on oversupply fears

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25 July 2016

Oil prices have fallen to a three-month low, hit by rising concerns that a global oversupply of both crude and natural gas will dampen prices.

US oil fell 2.4% to $43.11 (£32.72) a barrel, its lowest level since April, meaning it has now fallen by 12% so far this month.

Brent crude dropped 2.1% to $44.75, its lowest level since 10 May.

Shares in oil and firms also lost ground, with Exxon Mobil shares down 1.8% and Chevron down 2.6%.

“Crude oil markets have been under pressure as oil supplies have started growing with the resumption of output from the capacity lost due to wildfires in the Canadian oil sands,” said EY energy analyst Sanjeev Gupta.

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Oil giants hit amid fears of drop in demand

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PUBLISHED: 25/07/2016

The FTSE 100 index was off 20.4 points to 6710.13, as Brent crude sunk 1.9% to 44.83 US dollars (£37.50) a barrel after a report from Barclays warned global oil demand was down amid lacklustre growth from the global economy.

BP dropped 2.6%, or 11.8p, to 440.4p ahead of its interim results on Tuesday, while rival Royal Dutch Shell was also languishing in the red, slipping 2.5%, or 54.5p, to 2093.5p.

Sterling was also under pressure after a report from the Confederation of British Industry (CBI) said business optimism had deteriorated at its fastest pace since January 2009 following the Brexit vote.

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Shell Units Argue Market-Rigging Claims Lack Jurisdiction

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Screen Shot 2016-07-08 at 14.36.15By Cara Bayles

Law360, San Francisco (July 22, 2016, 8:48 PM ET) 

Two Royal Dutch Shell PLC affiliates on Thursday tried to escape allegations of European market manipulation from a proposed class of crude oil derivatives traders, arguing in New York federal court that U.S. courts don’t have jurisdiction over conduct by Shell’s international arm in foreign markets.

The reply in support of the affiliates’ motion to dismiss said the traders were trying to “manufacture claims and jurisdiction where neither exists” by blurring the distinction between two “sister subsidiaries” — Shell’s U.S. arm, Shell Trading US Co., or…

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Next Week Is as Good as It Gets for Big Oil

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ByRakteem Katakey and Joe Carroll: 22 July 2016

Several majors expected to post highest earnings in 3 quarters

Strong performance may not last as oil seen easing back to $40

For oil companies, the second quarter might be as good as it gets.

Shares gained more than in any other industry, thanks to crude rising from a 12-year low. Profits were the best in at least three quarters for majors including Royal Dutch Shell Plc, Chevron Corp. and BP Plc, helped by cost cuts, analysts say. The rest of the year might not be as rosy as supply holds near record levels.

The combined market value of the world’s oil companies shrank by $2 trillion in the past two years following crude’s collapse. While analysts agree the worst of the oversupply is over, BNP Paribas SA and JBC Energy GmbH are among those forecasting a slide back to $40 a barrel as output rebounds in Canada, Iran, Nigeria and the U.S., hurting producers whose investment cuts have put future growth in doubt.

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Shell to cut jobs in the Gulf of Mexico amid weak oil prices

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By Jennifer Larino, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayuneon July 21, 2016 at 3:55 PM, updated July 21, 2016 at 4:00 PM

Shell plans to cut, consolidate or relocate more than 150 offshore jobs in the Gulf of Mexico as part of an effort to shave 2,200 positions across its global operations this year. The restructure offshore follows job cuts at the company’s New Orleans office amid weak oil prices.

Shell has decided to move forward with “structural changes and personnel reductions” after reviewing its deepwater Gulf of Mexico operations, spokeswoman Kimberly Windon said in a statement emailed to NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune. Shell informed employees of its decision Thursday afternoon (July 21).

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Why Big Oil Is Still A Good Bet For Investors

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Screen Shot 2016-06-30 at 18.15.43By Michael McDonald – Jul 20, 2016, 2:23 PM CDT

Investors getting cold feet about the spiking price of Big Oil stocks over the last year may risk missing out on further gains, according to one top ranked analyst. Doug Terreson of Evercore, one of the top ranked oil analysts according to Institutional Investor magazine, is recommending that investors stick with integrated oil majors like Royal Dutch Shell, Chevron, and Exxon despite the run up in their prices.

Terreson’s thesis is that many of the catalysts for positive price performance remain in place. In particular, integrated oil companies have effectively reduced operating capital costs permanently, which lowers their breakeven expense to produce oil. The retort to this point of course is that Big Oil stocks may have cut costs but frackers have been much more successful than integrated majors in cutting their costs as a percentage of pre-crash production cost.

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Royal Dutch Shell: Huge Dividend And Long-Term Growth Ahead

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Wayne Duggan: 20 July 2016

A number of British stocks have been hit hard since the referendum vote to leave the EU, but Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A, RDS.B) is not one of them. Shares are now up 0.3% since the Brexit vote after initially falling more than 8% during the knee-jerk market sell-off.

With the possibility that the Brexit could severely impact British GDP growth in coming years, RDS.B offers a unique opportunity to invest in a company within a sector that is in a global upswing, a company that has significant international exposure and a company that is committed to maintaining the single largest dividend payment in the MSCI World Index.

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The Future of Big Oil? At Shell, It’s Not Oil

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Screen Shot 2016-07-20 at 07.42.44The energy giant is shifting to gas as the industry adapts to climate change.

By Matthew CampbellRakteem Katakey and James Paton: 20 July 2016

At Australia’s Curtis Island, you can see Big Oil morphing into Big Gas. Just off the continent’s rugged northeastern coast lies a 667-acre liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminal owned by Royal Dutch Shell, an engineering feat of staggering complexity. Gas from more than 2,500 wells travels hundreds of miles by pipeline to the island, where it’s chilled and pumped into 10-story-high tanks before being loaded onto massive ships. “We’re more a gas company than an oil company,” says Ben van Beurden, Shell’s chief executive officer. “If you have to place bets, which we have to, I’d rather place them there.”

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Royal Dutch Shell: Does Everything Come Down to Oil Price Recovery?

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By Staff Writer on Jul 19, 2016 at 9:07 am EST

World’s leading integrated oil and gas company, Royal Dutch Shell plc (ADR) (NYSE:RDS.A), concluded a deal to acquire BG not too long ago. The move was widely perceived as an aggressive step to become a dominant supplier of liquefied natural gas (LNG) across the globe. The deal is expected to help Shell diversify its operations and enable it to benefit from cost synergies in the years to come.

The merger came at a time when oil prices were on a downward trajectory, with the step expected to drive the company out of the downturn. Oil prices that were once above $110 per barrel have now plunged below $50. Last year, when the Dutch company announced the deal, many mergers and acquisition pundits criticized Shell’s willingness to pay 50% premium in a depressed crude oil environment.

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How Lower Oil Prices, Brexit Are Impacting North Sea Operations

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By Muhammad Ali Khawar on Jul 19, 2016 at 7:35 am EST

Thanks to Brexit vote, the oil and gas markets are experiencing significant level of uncertainties. With UK now stepping out of the European Union, many oil and gas companies have reduced operations as they feel that demand may not be as robust as it used to be.

The North Sea is one of the highest cost regions in the world. With the recent development in the UK market, companies fear higher costs, which can derail operations in the region. As reported by Bloomberg, Wood Mackenzie, a consulting firm, has indicated that around 30% of the fields in the region are operating at a loss.

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American Gas Will Be First to Pass Through Expanded Panama Canal

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Naureen Malik: July 19, 2016

Shell set to send tanker carrying U.S. LNG through canal

BP scheduled to send second tanker through the following day

The first cargo of liquefied natural gas set to pass through the newly expanded Panama Canal locks will be American.

Royal Dutch Shell Plc’s Maran Gas Apollonia vessel is scheduled to pass through the canal linking the Atlantic and Pacific oceans on July 25 after loading LNG from the U.S. Gulf Coast, according to the Panama Canal Authority, which oversees the locks’ operations. BP Plc’s British Merchant LNG tanker is expected to become the second to pass through the canal the following day and a third tanker is slated for early August, the agency said in a statement late Monday.

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Barron’s: Shell is “the world’s best big oil stock”

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Jul 18 2016, 11:44 ET | By: Carl Surran, SA News Editor

Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A +0.2%) appears barely affected by a Barron’s cover story this weekend which calls it “the world’s best big oil stock,” whose makeover could lift shares by more than 20% in a year even without a rise in oil prices.

Barron’s Jack Hough says Shell’s cost cuts and divestments look like more like a “recommitment to capitalism” rather than just an austerity drive, and has increased confidence in the company’s lofty 6.6% dividend yield.

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Getting Ready for Another Round of Commodity Market Downturn

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By Staff Writer on Jul 18, 2016 at 7:30 am EST

Crude oil prices have dropped below the $50 per barrel mark yet again after hitting their highest level in 2016 last month. US crude benchmark, West Texas Intermediate (WTI) is trading at $45.97 per barrel while Brent is trading at $47.69 per barrel in European Markets today. The global crude oil benchmark reached as high as $52.51 per barrel earlier in June.

Although oil prices have recovered some momentum after touching 12-year lows of $27 per barrel earlier in 2016, it still has a lot of ground to gain before reaching summer-2014 levels. Oil market showed some positive gains in June when oil prices crossed the psychological barrier of $50 per barrel. However, it was short-lived as it is currently trading below $48 per barrel.

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Shell with a full tank of debt

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By JACK HOUGH: JULY 16, 2016

A dash of desperation is working wonders for module article chiclet Royal Dutch Shell. The price of Brent crude oil has fallen by half in two years, pulling Shell’s cash flow from operations well below what it typically needs to pay its dividend and fund exploration. Meanwhile, the purchase of United Kingdom gas specialist BG Group, completed in February, left Shell with a full tank of debt.

Something had to give. Investors braced for a dividend cut, which is why the American depositary receipts (ticker: RDS.B) started the year priced low enough to yield 8%. But rather than reduce its payout, Shell slashed spending on projects and sold low-return businesses. Last month, it announced a capital plan through 2020 that calls for more asset sales and a limit on capital spending.

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Royal Dutch Shell Vs BP plc: Who’s Better Equipped to Tackle the Downturn?

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By Muhammad Ali Khawar on Jul 15, 2016 at 10:04 am EST

Royal Dutch Shell plc. (ADR) (NYSE:RDS.A) finally closed its $52 billion merger with BG group in February. The deal is considered as one of the largest mergers in the oil and gas sector and is expected to help Shell diversify its operations and benefit from cost synergies.

The Shell-BG merger comes at a time when oil prices have plummeted significantly. Oil prices that once traded over $110 per barrel have now tumbled to as low as $50 per barrel. Last year, when Shell approached BG for the first time, many criticized the deal especially because of the 50% premium Shell was willing to pay in a depressed crude environment.

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Uncertainty in the oil price war

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By Ed Crooks: JULY 15. 2016

“War is the realm of uncertainty,” wrote the great Prussian military theorist Carl von Clausewitz. “Three quarters of the factors on which action in war is based are wrapped in a fog of greater or lesser uncertainty.”

That applies to price wars every much as it does to the real kind. Almost from the moment crude began falling in 2014, news outlets started running confident-sounding claims that one side or another was winning the battle often depicted as a struggle between Saudi Arabia on one side and US shale producers on the other.

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Oil Is Facing The Perfect Storm

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By Cassandra Legacy – Jul 14, 2016, 3:27 PM CDT

Since at least the end of 2014 there has been increasing uncertainty over oil prices, from whether so-called “Peak Oil” has already happened, to matters of EROI (or EROEI) values for current energy sources and for alternatives, to climate change and the phantasmatic 2oC warming limit, and the feasibility of shifting rapidly to renewables or sustainable sources of energy supply. Overall, it matters a great deal whether a reasonable time horizon to act is say 50 years, i.e. in the main the troubles that we are contemplating are taking place way past 2050, or if we are already in deep trouble and the timeframe to try and extricate ourselves is some 10 years. Answering this kind of question requires close attention to system boundary definitions and scrutinizing carefully any assumptions.

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S&P trims rating on oil major

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by Tsveta ZikolovaWednesday, 13 Jul 2016, 14:09 BST

Standard & Poor’s has trimmed its rating on Royal Dutch Shell (LON:RDSA), the Financial Times has reported. The move has been prompted by the group’s £35-billion takeover of former smaller London-listed peer BG Group completed earlier this year.

Shell’s share price has been little changed in today’s session, having lost 0.07 percent to stand at 2,106.00p as of 13:25 BST. The shares are marginally underperforming the broader London market, with the benchmark FTSE 100 index having inched 0.12 percent higher to 6,688.62 points. Shell’s shares have gained nearly 16 percent over the past year, and are up just under 38 percent in the year-to-date.

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Shell North Sea strike: What we know so far

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Written by Niamh Burns – 13/07/2016 7:43 am

Oil workers could strike today for the first time in a generation after talks broke down between unions and Wood Group.

The move comes after oil major Shell found itself at the centre of the workforce dispute which has paved the way for industrial action.

BREAKING: RMT workers vote in support of strike action.

Unions decided to ballot their workers in May after initial talks regarding 30% pay cuts to eight of Shell’s North Sea platforms, including the Brent field, failed to provide a solution. It’s the third pay cut since 2014.

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S&P cuts Shell rating on BG takeover

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12 July 2016

Shell’s credit rating has been cut by S&P because of its £35bn takeover of rival BG Group.

The rating agency said on Tuesday evening it would cut the international oil company from A+ to A.

S&P said in a statement:

The downgrade reflects our view that, despite management’s commitment to reduce debt after the $54 billion acquisition of BG Group, Shell’s credit metrics and discretionary cash flow will remain materially below levels commensurate with the previous ‘A+’ rating in 2016 and 2017, as we expect continuing low oil and gas prices.

Earlier this year, Fitch reduced its credit rating for Shell from AA to AA-.

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Militants claim attack on Exxon as Shell shuts Nigerian pipeline

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Agence France-Presse : Jul 12, 2016 @ 12:05 PM

The Niger Delta Avengers (NDA) group said it had bombed an ExxonMobil facility in southern Nigeria just as Shell announced closure of a key oil pipeline, in the latest blow to output.

“At about 7:30 pm (1830 GMT) the Niger Delta Avengers blow up ExxonMobil Qua Iboe 48″ crude oil export pipeline,” the NDA, which has been blamed for a string of attacks on key oil and gas facilities since February, said in a statement late Monday.

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Shell-Led Group Delays Decision on Canada Gas Export Plan

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By Natalie Obiko Pearson and Rebecca Penty: July 11, 2016

LNG Canada cites industry challenges, capital constraints

Project says it can’t confirm when it plans final decision

Royal Dutch Shell Plc and its partners delayed for the second time this year a final investment decision on a terminal to export liquefied natural gas from Canada’s Pacific Coast to Asian markets.

LNG Canada, which is also backed by Mitsubishi Corp., PetroChina Co. and Korea Gas Corp., cited “global industry challenges, including capital constraints” in announcing the postponement in a statement on Monday.

“Participants have determined they need more time prior to taking a final investment decision,” the joint venture said. “At this time, we cannot confirm when this decision will be made.”

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Shell wins tender to sell Nigerian crude cargo to Argentina -traders

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Mon Jul 11, 2016

HOUSTON, July 11 (Reuters) – Anglo-Dutch oil company Royal Dutch Shell was awarded a tender last week to sell 1 million barrels of Nigeria’s Bonny Light crude to a group of refining firms in Argentina, traders said on Monday.

Firms buying the cargo include Oil Combustibles, Axion Energy, Petrobras Argentina and Shell. The crude must be delivered on August 1-10 and it will be processed at several domestic refineries.

It was not immediately possible to know the price agreed for the cargo. Shell has a policy not to comment on such commercial issues.

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Shell braces for North Sea strike action

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Jillian Ambrose: 11 JULY 2016

Shell is bracing itself for major strike action on its North Sea platforms after talks between workers and oilfield services company Wood Group broke down ahead of a union ballot.

Wood Group’s oil workers will vote on whether to take action over tougher offshore working schedules and lower pay, in what could be the first wave of strikes for the North Sea in a generation.

Trade unions Unite and RMT are balloting 200 of around 450 oil workers working across Shell’s platforms in the Brent oilfield, and on Wednesday will decide whether almost half the workforce will down tools.

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US oil leadership questioned

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By Ed Crooks: 8 July 2016

The most eye-catching story of the week was the estimate from Rystad Energy that the US holds the world’s largest oil reserves. As the table in Rystad’s press release shows, that calculation relies heavily on “undiscovered fields” in the US that have yet be found. In terms of proved reserves in existing fields, Saudi Arabia still has more than twice as much oil as the US, according to Rystad’s estimates. John Kemp of Reuters discussed the meaning of the varying figures for Saudi Arabia’s reserves, concluding: “No-one really knows how much more oil can be recovered from beneath the Saudi desert and adjoining areas in the Gulf.”

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Exclusive – Shell CEO warns Brexit could slow $30 billion asset sale plan

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Screen Shot 2016-06-30 at 18.15.43By Ron Bousso and Freya Berry: 08/07 11:41 CET

LONDON (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell’s chief executive, Ben van Beurden, has told investors that Britain’s decision to exit the European Union could slow its $30 billion (23 billion pounds) asset sale plan, especially in the North Sea which had struggled to attract buyers for years.

The comment, made during an investor and analyst event at the Wimbledon tennis tournament this week, came as Shell mandated Bank of America Merrill Lynch to find buyers for several key assets in the North Sea, including its stake in the lucrative Buzzard oilfield, hoping the sale would raise at least $2 billion.

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Shell Warns Of Further Job Cuts

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Screen Shot 2016-06-30 at 18.15.43By Irina Slav – Jul 05, 2016, 9:02 AM CDT

Shell may have to cut more jobs after laying off 12,500 people over the past year, CEO Ben van Beurden told The Telegraph. The new cuts would be prompted by a “continuous improvement drive,” he added.

Elaborating on what this drive would imply, Van Beurden noted jobs are becoming unnecessary as business operations get shut down, or positions being moved to another part of the world, or becoming redundant because of the drive for enhanced business efficiency.

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US oil reserves surpass those of Saudi Arabia and Russia

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Anjli Raval, Oil and Gas Correspondent: July 4, 2016

The US holds more oil reserves than Saudi Arabia and Russia, the first time it has surpassed those held by the world’s biggest exporting nations, according to a new study.

The US shale boom was a factor behind the recent oil price collapse that toppled the Brent crude benchmark from a mid-2014 high of $115 a barrel to below $30 earlier this year.

FULL FT ARTICLE

Shell seeks $2 billion from Aramco in Motiva joint venture breakup

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LONDON/HOUSTON | BY RON BOUSSO AND ERWIN SEBA: Mon Jul 4, 2016 3:25pm BST

Royal Dutch Shell (RDSa.L) has asked Saudi Aramco for up to $2 billion (£1.5 billion) as part of the breakup of their giant Motiva Enterprises refining joint venture in the United States, the latest stumbling point in a partnership fraught with tension.

The payment would be compensation for the Saudi company retaining a larger share of the nearly two decade-old JV. Its split was announced in March and is expected to be completed in October but disagreements over the payment could postpone the final date, sources close to the talks told Reuters.

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Shell job losses could be worsened by Brexit vote

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Oil giant Royal Dutch Shell has warned over the possibility of further job cuts.

The risk of more job losses is a result of uncertainty caused by the UK’s vote to quit the European Union, City A.M. understands.

Since last year Shell has slashed 12,500 jobs following the fall in oil prices and its tie-up with rival BG.

At the time of Shell’s initial takeover bid for BG Group last year it had 93,000 employees. Meanwhile, BG Group’s staff numbered around 5,000.

The deal came amid a collapse in oil prices, which fell from over $115 per barrel in the summer of 2014 to as low as $27 in February this year.

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Shell boss warns more job losses at the firm could “absolutely” happen

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Written by Mark Lammey – 03/07/2016 3:17 pm

The boss at Royal Dutch Shell (LON: RDSB) has reportedly said further job losses could “absolutely” take place at the company.

Shell chief executive Ben van Beurden said in an interview with the Sunday Telegraph cuts were always a possibility in the absence of large deals being struck.

Shell is axing about 12,500 roles this year due to a combination of low oil prices and its takeover of BG Group.

In May, the firm said the headcount for its North Sea operations would drop by 475 to 1,700 as part of the reductions.

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Shell chief Ben van Beurden: ‘You cannot expect us to act against our economic interest’

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By Emily Gosden, energy editor: 2 JULY 2016 • 2:30PM

On the last Thursday in January, the day Royal Dutch Shell’s £35bn takeover of BG Group got the final seal of approval from BG shareholders, Ben van Beurden was not planning a celebration.

Shell’s chief executive was instead preparing to get on with the detailed work of integrating the two companies: some 200 senior staff from Shell and BG had been assembled in The Hague, ready to spend Friday and the weekend working out what would happen when one of the biggest deals in history finally completed.

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Chevron Halts Production At Gorgon Plant For Second Time This Year

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By Lincoln Brown – Jul 01, 2016, 3:18 PM CDT

For the second time this year, Chevron has stopped production at its Gorgon liquefied natural gas operation in Australia. The plant had to be evacuated after a gas leak was detected.

Chevron will make the necessary repairs to the plant before restarting production next week. The plant is a joint venture with ExxonMobil, Shell, Osaka Gas, Tokyo Gas and Chubu Electric Power. The terminal, which is also owned in part by Exxon Mobil and Royal Dutch Shell, will still load cargo during the interim.

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Oil Is Still Heading to $10 a Barrel

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By A. Gary Shilling:JUNE 28, 2016 12:00 PM EDT

Back in February 2015, the price of West Texas Intermediate stood at about $52 per barrel, half of its 2014 peak. I argued then that a renewed decline was coming that could drive it below $20, a scenario regarded by oil bulls as unthinkable. But prices did fall further, dropping all the way to a low of $26 in February. Since then, crude rallied to spend several weeks flirting with $50 per barrel, a level not seen since last year. But it won’t last; I’m sticking to my call for prices to decline anew to $10 to $20 per barrel.

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Brexit impact fades

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Gary Shilling for Bloomberg View suggested oil could drop to $10.

By Ed Crooks: Friday, July 1, 2016

Oil was one of the markets where the initial shock of the UK’s Brexit vote quickly faded. Brent crude was about $51 per barrel as the voters went to the polls last week, and today was trading at about $49.50. 

The 34 per cent rise in oil so far in 2016 has been its best start to a year since 2009, and helped commodities outperform other asset classes over the past six months.

The rise in prices has brightened the mood in Texas, according to a new survey carried out by the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas. It looks like being a good data source to watch in future.

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Shell urges continued free trade and free movement of people post-Brexit

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Emily Gosden, energy editor: 30 JUNE 2016 • 7:02PM

Royal Dutch Shell has urged the UK to retain free trade and free movement of people with the EU in the wake of Brexit.

Ben van Beurden, the oil giant’s chief executive, said it was not yet clear how Shell would be affected by Britain leaving the EU and he was concerned by the prospect of a period of change and uncertainty. 

“It’s crucial that European governments will keep now a steady hand on the tiller of the economy in what will be probably unprecedented, unpredictable circumstances for some time to come,” he said.

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CEO urges continued free trade and movement post-Brexit

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by Tsveta ZikolovaFriday, 01 Jul 2016, 07:58 BST

Royal Dutch Shell (LON:RDSA) has urged the UK to retain free trade and free movement of people with the European Union in the wake of Brexit, The Telegraph has reported, quoting the Anglo-Dutch group’s chief executive. Ben van Beurden, who backed the Remain camp, further noted that it was not yet clear how the oil major would be affected by the outcome of last week’s vote.

Shell’s share price rallied in yesterday’s session, adding 2.38 percent to end the day at 2,047.5p. The advance was largely in line with gains in the broader London market, with the benchmark FTSE 100 index surging 2.27 percent to close at 6,504.33 points following dovish comments by Bank of England governor Mark Carney. The group’s shares have gained a little over 10 percent over the past year, and are more than 34 percent better off in the year-to-date.

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Shell boss taking ‘a good look’ at North Sea assets

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Friday, 1 July 2016

Royal Dutch Shell’s chief executive has told the BBC he is taking “a good look” at the company’s North Sea assets, in the light of weak oil prices.

Ben van Beurden said that some older fields might be sold and others decommissioned.

He also said the company’s dividend payout was “safe and secure”, despite tough conditions for oil companies.

With an annual payout of $15bn (£11bn), Shell is the biggest payer of dividends among UK companies.

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Shell wants Scotland to remain in UK despite Brexit uncertainty

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MARK WILLIAMSON: 1 JULY 2016

ROYAL Dutch Shell has highlighted uncertainty caused by the Brexit vote but said it wants Scotland to remain part of the UK.

Chief executive Ben van Beurden made clear the oil and gas giant’s unease at the shock outcome of last Thursday’s vote, which he said had posed a risk to economies across Europe.

“The outcome of the EU referendum has created uncertainty. It’s crucial that the European governments keep a steady hand on the tiller of the economy in these unprecedented, unpredictable circumstances,” the Dutch executive told a conference in London.

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Saudi-Iran Conflict ‘Minefield’ for Japan Oil Refiner Merger

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By Tsuyoshi Inajima,  Emi Urabe and Shigeru Sato: Updated on July 1, 2016 

  • Idemitsu founding family says shouldn’t hold stake in rival

  • Co. agreed to buy share of Japanese refiner Showa Shell

Screen Shot 2016-06-30 at 18.15.43The conflict between Middle East oil suppliers Iran and Saudi Arabia is playing out between the founding family of one of Japan’s largest refiners and its board.

Idemitsu Kosan Co. agreed last July to buy a stake with 33.3 percent voting rights in Showa Shell Sekiyu KK from Royal Dutch Shell Plc for 169 billion yen ($1.64 billion). Idemitsu has close ties with Iran and shouldn’t be associated with Showa Shell, in which state-run Saudi Arabian Oil Co. owns a stake, said a lawyer for Idemitsu’s founding family, which “wants the company to let go of the stake.”

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Royal Dutch Shell: This Is Another Catalyst

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Jun. 30, 2016 4:35 PM ET

Summary

  • Royal Dutch Shell witnessed weakness in the downstream segment last quarter due to lower refining margins, but this is about to change going forward.
  • There has been a rapid recovery in the refining marker margins, which has increased from around $9 a barrel to almost $17 a barrel within a short time.
  • Shell’s downstream performance will improve as refining margins in the second quarter averaged higher than the first quarter, with more upside expected going forward.
  • Driven by higher gasoline consumption and increasing utilization rates, refining margins will increase in the long run and act as a tailwind for Shell.
  • Shell’s structural improvements in the downstream, such as refinery integration in Louisiana, will allow it to lower costs and tap the end-market demand in a better manner.

In a recent article on Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A, RDS.B), I had focused on how an improvement in the upstream business will bring about a recovery in the company’s overall financial performance. The upstream business was under a lot of pressure in the first quarter, and a rally in oil prices over the past few months will ease the pressure on the same as oil price realizations improve.

But, being an integrated oil and gas company, Shell’s performance will also be driven by its downstream segment, which was also under pressure last quarter as refining margins took a tumble. So, in this article, we will see how Shell’s downstream segment has done and how it might do going forward.

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Shell boss keen to help UK with climate change, “when it makes business sense”

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Written by Mark Lammey – 30/06/2016 5:59 am

The boss of Royal Dutch Shell (LON: RDSB) wants the oil and gas giant to play a big part in the UK’s quest to meet climate change targets, “when it makes business sense”.

Shell chief executive Ben van Beurden also expects the UK’s energy demand to level off as the country becomes more fuel efficient.

“Social, political and geographical conditions differ from country to country,” Mr van Beurden will say today at the company’s Powering Progress Together Forum. “In other words, the energy transition is likely to play out in a different way and at a different pace in different places.

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Royal Dutch Shell says UK energy demand set to fall in future

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Jessica Morris is City A.M.’s industrials reporter. Thursday 30 June 2016 12:06am

The boss of oil major Royal Dutch Shell is set to say that energy demand in the UK will fall, while urging the government to help meet the world’s climate change goals.

Ben van Beurden, chief executive of Shell, will tell an audience at a forum in London later today: “In the UK … demand for energy is likely to level off as a result of, for example, energy efficiency.

“But this does not mean the UK can sit back and relax. It has a legally binding commitment to reduce its carbon emissions by 80 per cent by 2050, from the 1990 level.”

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Royal Dutch Shell’s Recovery Will Strengthen The Rally

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Jun. 29, 2016 4:22 PM ET|

Summary

Royal Dutch Shell’s upstream business has struggled on account of lower oil price realizations, but this is about to change going forward.

With Brent now hovering around $50, the average price of oil has improved in the second quarter and this will help Shell improve its realizations in the upstream.

Shell’s upstream performance could improve further as higher inventory drawdown on the back of weakening production and stronger demand will lead to higher prices.

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Royal Dutch Shell plc and Gemfields plc: the perfect resources partnership?

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By Peter Stephens – Wednesday, 29 June, 2016

With the price of oil having made a storming comeback since earlier this year, Shell (LSE: RDSB) now has a much brighter future than it did just a few months ago. Clearly, there are still challenges ahead for the oil major, with there being a very real possibility that the price of oil could come under further pressure. That’s especially the case if Brexit acts as a negative catalyst on global economic growth and demand for oil falls yet further.

However, even in such a situation, Shell remains an appealing play due to its size and scale. In fact, Shell would be likely to benefit from such a situation, since it could likely outlast most of its sector peers and emerge in a stronger position with greater market share when oil eventually recovers.

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Why Royal Dutch Shell plc’s share price could collapse 60%!

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…with the fossil fuel giant battling a gigantic $70bn debt pile as well as a sickly revenues outlook, I believe asset sales alone may not be enough to keep the balance sheet afloat, and that dividend cuts could still be on the cards.

By Royston Wild – Monday, 27 June, 2016

Despite the volatility smashing financial markets on Friday — Britain’s decision to exit the European Union caused the FTSE 100 to shunt 3.2% lower — oil sector shares proved to be extraordinarily robust.

Indeed, fossil fuel giant Shell (LSE: RDSB) saw its share price slip just 0.3% on the day. This is despite wide risk-aversion pushing Brent back below $50 per barrel, the crude benchmark shedding 5% of its value to rest at $48.50.

Steady… for the moment

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Police Confirm Attack On Shell Facility In Nigeria

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Screen Shot 2016-06-07 at 23.34.38By Lincoln Brown – Jun 24, 2016

Police in the area of Imo in Nigeria have confirmed that there has been an attack on a Shell Petroleum Development Company (SPDC) facility there. The attack, which was in the Ohaji/Egbema Local Government area took place early Thursday.

One source told the News Agency of Nigeria that the attack came at 5:30 in the morning and reported an explosion that created a great deal of flame. That source could not confirm if anyone was killed in the incident.

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Oil Prices and the Brexit: What Just Happened

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IMAGE SOURCE: GETTY IMAGES.

By Matthew Dilallo: 24 June 2016

What: Crude prices tumbled on Friday after Britain’s stunning decision to leave the European Union. By mid-afternoon, oil was down 4.5% and back below $50 a barrel. The sell-off washed over into oil stocks, with British giants BP (NYSE:BP) and Royal Dutch Shell (NYSE:RDS-A)(NYSE:RDS-B) both following crude downward by more than 5% as of 12:30 p.m. EDT.

Those moves, however, were tame compared to the sell-offs of other European oil stocks, with Statoil (NYSE:STO) and Total (NYSE:TOT) down nearly 6% and 9%, respectively. Even large independent U.S. oil companies were taking it on the chin, with ConocoPhillips (NYSE:COP) just one among the many oil stocks sliding in parallel with the price of crude.

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Goldman Sachs Says Oil Isn’t Recovering

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By James Burgess – Jun 15, 2016

Goldman Sachs has rejected analysts’ opinions that the global oil market is recovering, noting that while it expects a “modest” deficit in the coming months based on the slight rebound in oil prices, the market will again be in a state of surplus by early next year.

It may seem as if oil is recovering on the back of supply disruptions that have helped to chip away at the global glut and push prices close to $50, but Goldman says that in the best-case scenario this isn’t a rebound—it’s just the first signs of one.

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Brexit and Brent

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Screen Shot 2016-05-30 at 15.37.19By Ed Crooks: June 24, 2016

In the market maelstrom that followed the UK’s referendum vote to leave the EU, the oil price took some collateral damage, with Brent crude dropping below $48 for the first time in a week. As the country sat up to watch the results come in, National Grid had to cope with the largest ever spike in night-time electricity demand.

The longer-term implications of Brexit for energy in the UK and Europe, like most other consequences of the decision, are highly uncertain. Politico and others sketched out some of the main issues, with news outlets taking a range of differing perspectives. Norton Rose Fulbright published an excellent primer, focusing on some of the key legal questions. BusinessGreen rounded up reaction from environmental campaigners and renewable energy businesses. Christiana Figueres, executive secretary of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, suggested before the result was known that a vote for Brexit would mean the Paris agreement on tackling global warming would “require recalibration”.

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