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Nothing New About Shell Settling Fraud Cases

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From April 2016:

Shell guilty of energy fraud and market manipulation in the US

From August 2004:

Shell settles fraud case for $150M

Oil company agrees to pay SEC for overstating reserves, also settles market abuse case in Britain.

The settlements are not just for fraud but range all the way to complicity in murder.

New York Times: “Shell Settles Dumping Suit for $3 Million“: 9 February 1995

New York Times: “SHELL SETTLES ROYALTIES CASE FOR $33.5 MILLION“: 21 March 2002

Shell Oil Company Limestone Township $26 million settlement: December 2007

Plaintiffs win $66 million from Shell Oil after making the mistake of relying on Shell’s “honesty and integrity”: 17 May 2008

Houston Chronicle: Shell will pay millions to settle air pollution suit: 23 April 2009

Guardian: Shell agrees to pay compensation for execution of Saro-Wiwa: June 2009

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NIGERIA: MAJOR GAS FACILITY WON’T BE REPAIRED UNTIL MAY

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Screen Shot 2016-03-15 at 10.34.57BY CONOR GAFFEY ON 4/18/16 AT 12:32 PM

Power outages in Nigeria are likely to persist until May as oil and gas giant Shell struggles to repair a major facility damaged by militants.

Nigeria’s Vice President Yemi Osinbajo visited the Forcados Export Terminal in the southern Delta state over the weekend. The facility, which is run by a subsidiary of Royal Dutch Shell, known as the Shell Petroleum Development Corporation, was subject to an attack in February when an underwater pipeline was hit by an explosion.

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Shell says theft from its Nigerian oil pipeline network fell in 2015

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Business | Mon Apr 18, 2016 9:02am BST

Theft of crude oil from the pipeline network of Shell’s Nigerian subsidiary fell to 25,000 barrels per day (bpd) in 2015, the company said on Monday, roughly 32 percent less than the previous year.

The number of sabotage-related spills on the SPDC network also declined to 93 in 2015, compared with 139 the previous year, Shell said in its annual sustainability report.

It attributed the decrease to divestments in the Niger Delta and increased surveillance and security by the Nigerian government, but said theft and sabotage were still responsible for around 85 percent of spills from SPDC operations.

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Environmental group files lawsuit over ‘expired’ Shell Arctic oil permits

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Bob Weber / The Canadian Press: April 11, 2016

Environmentalists have asked a court to declare invalid a group of Arctic offshore energy exploration permits that are delaying the creation of Canada’s third national marine protected area.

On Monday, the World Wildlife Fund filed a lawsuit in Federal Court alleging that 30 permits held by Shell Canada at the eastern gate of the Northwest Passage lapsed decades ago.

“There’s no indication they’ve ever been renewed,” said Ian Miron, the group’s lawyer.

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Lower oil without higher growth

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Screen Shot 2016-03-28 at 11.17.16By Ed Crooks: April 8, 2016

The failure of falling oil prices to give much of a boost to global growth has been one of the big issues in the world economy this year. The FT’s Chris Giles gave a magisterial overview of why oil has been the shot in the arm that missed its target, although he raised the more cheerful possibility that the stimulus may simply be deferred until next year.

The correlation between oil prices and share prices has remained in full effect, even though an unexpected drop in US crude inventories boosted oil for a while. Brent crude began Friday at about $40 per barrel, up 48 per cent from its low point in January, but still down 65 per cent from its peak in June 2014.

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Shell target of Nigerian corruption probe

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Screen Shot 2016-03-30 at 13.04.33Global Witness said Dutch supermajor and its partners exposed shareholders to risk.

By Daniel J. Graeber

LONDON, March 31 (UPI) — Transparency advocates said Royal Dutch Shell and its partners in Nigeria may have exposed shareholders to a high level of risk in a corrupt system.

Global Witness said it was joining Nigerian anti-corruption campaigners in working to expose what they say is an opaque corporate reputation in the country. Global Witness Director Simon Taylor said that, working with Italian energy company Eni, the Dutch supermajor was stained by corruption.

“Shell and Eni exposed their investors to massive risks and have been tainted by this theft from Nigerian citizens,” he said in a statement.

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The downside of cheap oil

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By Ed Crooks: 25 March 2016

Probably the greatest puzzle of the oil crash is why it hasn’t done more to strengthen global growth. The shift in purchasing power from companies and governments of oil-producing countries to consumers puts money in the pockets of people who are more likely to spend it, and that should act as a stimulus. It hasn’t quite worked out like that.

This week the FT launched a series titled ‘Lower for Longer’ exploring some of the reasons why. Number One on the list of likely explanations is the mountain of debts the industry built up during the boom times. Oil and gas company debt almost tripled from $1.1tn to $3tn between 2006 and 2014, according to the Bank for International Settlements, which has done some important research on the issue.  The oil industry, energy markets and the world economy are all struggling with the burden of that debt: the hangover after the oil investment boom of the past decade. Investors have lost at least $150bn in oil and gas company bonds, and over $2tn in equity values.

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Nigeria to Launch Environmental Cleanup

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Screen Shot 2016-03-15 at 10.34.57Shell Oil Co., a division of Royal Dutch Shell, admitted blame for oil spills in Ogoniland.

Peter Clottey: March 19, 2016 5:19 PM

Nigeria plans a massive cleanup in the oil-rich Niger Delta region, where some residents complain that years of poorly regulated petroleum production have taken a toll on vegetation, water quality, farmland and fishing communities.  

Alhaji Ibrahim Usman Jibril, minister of state for environment, said President Muhammadu Buhari is committed to resolving the country’s environmental challenges while creating jobs and ensuring sustainable development.

As evidence of that commitment, Jibril noted Buhari created two cabinet positions for the sector. Amina Mohammed is the minister for the environment.

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60 YEARS AFTER NIGERIA’S FIRST CRUDE: Oloibiri oil dries up, natives wallow in abject poverty

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Screen Shot 2016-02-17 at 08.47.47By Samuel Oyadongha & Emem Idio, Yenagoa: 13 MARCH 2016

Like the gold rush of California in 19th century America, the small settlement of Oloibiri, a district headquarters in Ogbia in the defunct Eastern Region, came into  limelight in second half of the 20th  century when workers of Shell Darcy converged on the  town in search of the black gold.

However, the explorers made history in June 1956 when they struck the black gold in swampy communities of Otuabagi/Otuogidi in the Oloibiri District of Ogbia, making the latter district the first in West Africa where crude oil was discovered in commercial quantity. Providence again ensured that the Ogbia kingdom produced the first minority President in history from the backwater of the Delta in the person of Dr. Goodluck Jonathan, an indigene of Otuoke.

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Time to End ‘Blood Oil’ Disaster in the Niger Delta

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By Richard SteinerProfessor and conservation biologist, Oasis Earth (www.oasis-earth.com): 10 MARCH 2016

The Niger Delta’s legendary “blood oil” disaster has persisted for decades, and is now deepening. Oil in the Delta fuels a dangerous mix of environmental devastation, a violent militancy that has killed thousands, human rights abuses, corporate greed and exploitation, epidemic corruption, massive oil theft, sabotage, repression, poverty, anger and despair. It is time to put an end to this ongoing atrocity, once and for all.

The 30,000 square mile Niger Delta — including rich coastal waters, islands, mangroves swamps, and rainforests — was once one of the most productive and diverse ecological habitats on Earth. But today, after 60 years of oil extraction, the region’s environment and society are devastated — a textbook example of the “oil curse.

The Delta is arguably the most severely oil-damaged environment anywhere in the world. A decade ago, our team of scientists conducting an oil damage assessment in the Delta estimated that each year, some 250,000 barrels (10 million gallons) of oil spill there, an amount comparable to that of the 1989 Exxon Valdez spill in Alaska — each year for 50 years. Oil operations have also caused extensive habitat degradation from road building, forest clearing, dredging and filling, thousands miles of pipelines, and chronic pollution from gas flaring and drilling wastes.

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Nigerian Pipeline Bombed, Knocking Off 300,000 Barrels Per Day

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Screen Shot 2016-02-17 at 08.47.47By Nick Cunningham09 March 2016

A bombed pipeline could cut into oil exports from Nigeria for the next few months.

The Trans Forcados pipeline was struck by a bomb in February, causing Shell Petroleum Development Corporation, a subsidiary of the oil major Shell, to declare force majeure, as it was unable to export crude through the Forcados terminal.

The pipeline may not be repaired until May, according to head of Nigeria’s state-owned oil company Emmanuel Ibe Kachikwu. “I have been assured by Shell that in six to eight weeks, we will be back,” said Kachikwu. “The earliest the line could be back up with replacements and parts flown in [to Nigeria] is mid-May,” a source told the Financial Times.

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Bombed pipeline to halt Nigeria’s crude oil output until May

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By Maggie Fick in Lagos and Anjli Raval in London

The damage caused by an attack on an underwater pipeline is set to halt flows of Nigeria’s Forcados crude oil to one of the country’s biggest export terminals until May.

Shell Petroleum Development Corporation , a Royal Dutch Shell subsidiary which operates the pipeline, declared force majeure on February 21, a week after the pipeline was hit by an explosion, causing a leak that forced it to halt loadings to the Forcados export terminal.

Repairs to the pipeline could take until May, Emmanuel Ibe Kachikwu, minister of state for petroleum and the head of Nigeria’s oil company, said in Abuja on Tuesday.

The bombing of the pipeline was the most sophisticated attack on Nigeria’s oil-producing Delta in years and raised fears that such sabotage could once again cripple output in Africa’s top oil producer.

“I have been assured by Shell that in six to eight weeks, we will be back,” said Mr Kachikwu.

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March 2016: Multiple news sources report that Nigerians have been given the go-ahead to sue Shell in UK court over oil spills

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By John Donovan

Multiple news sources have reported the latest legal proceedings brought against Shell in London on behalf of Nigerian communities. 

Parties pursuing litigation against Shell are frequently in contact with me seeking advice, inside information and internal evidence. I am always grateful in this regard for invaluable input from Shell insider sources, some of whom have provided information to me for over a decade. 

With regards to the latest litigation, suffice it to say that I was pleased to provide extensive assistance on a confidential basis to Leigh Day, the London law firm acting for their Nigerian clients. 

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Nigerians given go-ahead to sue Shell in UK court over oil spills

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Screen Shot 2016-02-17 at 08.47.47Owen Bowcott Legal affairs correspondent: Wednesday 2 March 2016 

In a statement before the hearing on Wednesday, Shell blamed sabotage and oil theft for the pollution. The company said it had halted production more than two decades ago in Ogoniland, the area where the two communities are located.

Shell said it would challenge the jurisdiction of the British court: “Asking the English court to intervene … is a direct challenge to the internal political acts and decisions of the Nigerian state.”

Human rights activists argue that such pollution levels would never be tolerated in the home countries of such multinationals.

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Nigerian Communities Can Sue Royal Dutch Shell Over Oil Spills, U.K. Court Says

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Screen Shot 2016-03-02 at 15.29.20The suits are the latest international litigation to face Shell for environmental damage stemming from its Nigerian operations

By SARAH KENT: March 2, 2016 

LONDON—Two Nigerian communities can sue Royal Dutch Shell PLC’s Nigerian unit in the U.K. over oil spills in the West African country, a London court ruled Wednesday, testing whether energy companies can be held liable in their home country for events elsewhere.

The lawsuits, filed with the London High Court, are the latest international litigation to face Shell for environmental damage stemming from its Nigerian operations. The Anglo-Dutch company reached a £55 million ($77.4 million) settlement in a similar U.K. lawsuit brought by the Niger Delta-based Bodo community in January 2015. It also is being sued in the Netherlands in a separate case over Nigerian oil spills.

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Nigerians sue Shell in UK court over oil spills contamination

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London law firm Leigh Day & Co. is representing them after winning an unprecedented $83.5 million in damages from Shell in a landmark ruling by the same court last year. Shell originally offered villagers $50,000.

In a statement Wednesday before the trial opened, Shell blamed sabotage and oil theft for the ongoing pollution and noted it had halted oil production in 1993 in Ogoniland, the area where the two communities are located in Nigeria’s oil-rich southern Niger Delta.

Shell said it will challenge the jurisdiction of the British court.

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Shell and Nigerian Partner Are Sued in Britain Over Spills

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By STANLEY REEDMARCH 2, 2016

LONDON — Nigerian communities from the oil-rich Niger Delta initiated court action on Wednesday in London against the energy giant Royal Dutch Shell, in a case that may have far-reaching implications for whether companies can be sued in Britain for pollution and damages caused by their activities in other countries.

The case is based on accusations by farming and fishing communities that say they have suffered years of damage because of repeated large spills from oil pipelines in their home areas.

The law firm Leigh Day is bringing the claims against Shell and its Nigerian joint venture, the Shell Petroleum Development Company of Nigeria, in London on behalf of two communities in the swampy, oil-rich Niger Delta: the Ogale and the Bille.

On Wednesday, the claimants won a small victory when a judge ruled that the Nigerian venture could be included in the case, along with its parent company.

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Shell faces fresh Nigeria pollution claims in London

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By FP: PUBLISHED: 3:55, 2 March 2016

Oil giant Royal Dutch Shell came under renewed scrutiny on Wednesday over its environmental record in Nigeria after lawyers brought fresh claims of damage caused by spills to a London court.

British legal firm Leigh Day has filed two cases at the High Court in a bid to force the Anglo-Dutch energy major to clean up damage caused in the communities of Ogale and Bille in the Niger Delta, Nigeria’s main oil-producing region, and provide compensation.

In Bille, the lawyers hope to prove that Shell is liable for failing to protect its pipelines from damage caused by third parties, which, they said, could mark a “significant expansion” in the firm’s liability.

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INVESTORS WARNED: SHELL FACES FURTHER LAWSUITS FOR NIGERIA OIL SPILLS

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Screen Shot 2016-02-29 at 15.03.25Shell’s failure to maintain and protect pipelines may leave it liable to a raft of compensation claims from dozens of Niger Delta communities, said Amnesty International today as London law firm Leigh Day announced two more lawsuits against Royal Dutch Shell.

The latest cases were filed today on behalf of two communities in the Niger Delta who have been affected by oil pollution, Bille and Ogale.

In its investor briefing, Shell’s growing liabilities in the Niger Delta: Lessons from the Bodo court case , Amnesty International warns Shell’s investors that failures in the way the oil giant inspects and reports on oil spills could mask the scale of potential financial liability arising for Shell.

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Nigeria Groups Take Oil Spill Complaints Against Shell to Court

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Screen Shot 2016-02-29 at 15.03.25Sarah McGregor and Chris Kay: March 1, 2016

Two Nigerian communities have filed cases in a London court alleging Royal Dutch Shell Plc is responsible for oil spills that have contaminated the Niger River delta, according to the legal team representing them both.

The first hearing for both claims against Shell and its local unit, Shell Petroleum Development Co., will begin on Wednesday in a London court, according to the statement. The action is being led by Leigh Day, the law firm that handled a similar case that Shell settled last year by agreeing to pay 55 million pounds ($77 million) to compensate more than 15,000 residents of the Nigerian Bodo community for oil spills in 2008. Shell Petroleum Development is “at an early stage” of reviewing the claims, the company said in a statement.

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Shell being sued in two claims over oil spills in Nigeria

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Two communities are claiming compensation and want Shell to clean up their land.

Shell said it is at an “early stage” in reviewing the claims and that the case should be heard in Nigeria.

The Ogale community of about 40,000 people in Rivers State, on the coast of Nigeria, who are mainly farmers or fishermen, are some of the claimants.

Their case is being handled by law firm Leigh Day.

Spills since 1989 have meant they don’t have clean drinking water, farmland or rivers, their claim says.

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Arctic Was a Bet That Didn’t Pay Off, Departing Shell Chief Says

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Jennifer A Dlouhy: Bloomberg.com: 24 FEB 2016

The departing chief of Royal Dutch Shell Plc’s U.S. division, who presided over its failed quest to find crude in Arctic waters off Alaska, said the effort was still a point of pride because it demonstrated the company’s technical expertise.

Marvin Odum, 57, is leaving the company in a reorganization announced Wednesday. He has been with the company for 34 years and held the post atop its U.S. division, Shell Oil Co., since oil prices were at record highs.

The Arctic was “a big bet,” Odum said in a telephone interview Wednesday. 

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Prisoners draw corporate evil-doers who should be in jail but aren’t

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By Katie Herzog on 18 Feb 2016

Jeff Greenspan and Andrew Tider created Captured, a project that commissions illustrated portraits of CEOs who aren’t in prison but should be — drawn by actual prisoners.

“Corporations frequently commit crimes any average person would be imprisoned for,” write Greenspan and Tider. “These corporate crimes devastate our environment, economy, and society, yet the companies committing them often get away with only paying a settlement. These payouts do little damage to a corporation’s bottom line and are practically baked into their budgets.”

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Nigeria’s revenue woes worsen as major trouble hit Forcados, oil lifting suspended

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Emmanuel Mayah: 18 FEB 2016

Nigeria’s crude oil export operation has suffered a serious setback following a major crack-up of a giant underwater pipeline at the Forcados export terminal.

Following the incident, crude oil lifting h‎as now been suspended at that platform, officials said.

The pipeline, described as a big artery in the nation’s oil production was said to have suffered a huge rupture under circumstances that are at the moment still hazy.

Nigeria is already bleeding from the impact of low oil prices, with revenue dipping month after month.

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Shell the company most criticised by campaigners

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Sunday 17 JAN 2016

German carmaker Volkswagen was one of the “most disliked” companies for pressure groups last year following its emissions scandal, a survey has found.

Shell was the most criticised by campaigners, followed by Monsanto, which makes genetically modified food.

Half of the top-10 most criticised companies on Sigwatch’s list were energy firms, because of “the elephant in the room – climate change,” Mr Blood said.

Top was Shell, but TransCanada, ExxonMobil, EDF and BP also featured.

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Shell lease requests offshore Alaska face scrutiny

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Shell is challenging a decision by the federal government to deny its request to suspend leases in the Arctic waters off the coast of Alaska that would expire in 2017 and 2020. Federal leases expire at the end of their terms unless operators are engaged in drilling or related activity.

ANCHORAGE, Alaska, Jan. 14 (UPI) — A group of environmental activists filed a challenge to leases held by Royal Dutch Shell in Alaskan waters, citing the need to act on behalf of the climate.

Earthjustice, working on behalf of eight conservation groups, including the Sierra Club and Greenpeace, filed to intervene in decisions before the Department of Interior regarding Shell’s leases in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas.

“The Arctic Ocean is ground zero for climate change, and drilling in such a sensitive region threatens the whales, seals and countless other wildlife that call it home,” Earthjustice attorney Erik Grafe said in a statement.

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Nigeria: Shell Spill Set Ablaze in Bayelsa Community

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By Igoniko Oduma: 3 JANUARY 2016

Yenagoa — An oil spill site at Oruma/Yiba-Ama community, Ogbia Local Government Area, Bayelsa State, has been set ablaze by unknown persons.

Sources said Shell abandoned the Ogbia segment of the spill incident without carrying out clean-up and remediation of the devastated Oruma/Yiba-Ama environment.

The report of the Joint Investigation Visit (JIV) carried out on the oil spill which was concluded on 25 June, 2015, indicated that the incident was allegedly caused by third party interference with 306 barrels of crude oil spilled.

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Environmental group condemns Shell for poor response to oil spill incident at Adibawa Oil field

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By NAN on January 2, 2016

An Environmental Rights group has condemned what it called the ‘slow response of Shell Petroleum Development Company (SPDC) to the oil spill incident of July 12,2015 at the Adibawa Oil field, operated by the company.

Environmental Rights Action/Friends of the Earth Nigeria (ERA/FoEN) made the condemnation in its field report on the oil field, a copy which was made available to News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) in Yenagoa on Saturday.

The group regretted that more than six months after the oil leak incident was reported, oil recovery was yet to be completed, exposing the environment to continued pollution by spilled crude.

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US Gulf oil spill nearly ruined BP, says chief Bob Dudley

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Screen Shot 2015-12-07 at 20.08.32Saturday 2 Jan 2016

The giant oil spill from a BP rig off the US coast in 2010 nearly ruined the company, its chief executive has said.

Bob Dudley described the fire on the Deepwater Horizon and its aftermath as “a near death experience” for the firm.

It was one of the worst environmental disasters in the US and saw BP pay fines and compensation and sell off more than £30bn ($45bn) in assets.

Mr Dudley told ex-BP boss Lord Browne – a guest editor on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme – it was a “tragic accident”.

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YOUR COMPANY IS EVIL

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London Rising Tide protesters outside the Royal Courts of Justice to highlight Shell’s devastating pollution in Nigeria 

To whom this may concern, 

I am writing an e-mail to you to let you know how disgusting and disgraceful company is, I am referring to the oil spills in Nigeria where your carelessness has affected the lives of the local people there…….I know that it is of little concern for your company who care nothing but making profit. It is also annoying to know individuals are powerless to make a difference and your continuation of lying of cleaning the oil spills or even repairing the pipes which are leaking this hazardous poison (oil) into mother earth.

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Royal Dutch Shell braced for a flood of compensation claims

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Screen Shot 2015-12-19 at 14.30.30By ROB DAVIES FOR THE DAILY MAIL19 December 2015

Royal Dutch Shell is braced for a flood of compensation claims against its Nigerian business over oil spills, after a ruling that makes it more vulnerable to lawsuits.

Judges in The Hague, Netherlands, ordered Shell to hand over documents that could shed light on the cause of spills, which the firm blamed on sabotage by oil thieves.

The ruling is a blow for Shell, which had argued that cases against its Nigerian joint venture SPDC should be heard in Nigeria where the plaintiffs are based, and where companies cannot be held responsible for spills caused by sabotage.

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Shell could face ‘tens of billions in damages’ over Nigeria spills

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Court rules Royal Dutch Shell can be held liable for oil spills at its subsidiary in Nigeria

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Screen Shot 2015-11-20 at 08.55.47By Reuters: 1:34PM GMT 18 Dec 2015

A Dutch appeals court has ruled that Royal Dutch Shell can be held liable for oil spills at its subsidiary in Nigeria, potentially opening the way for other compensation claims against the multinational.

Judges in The Hague ordered Shell to make available to the court documents that might shed light on the cause of the oil spills and whether leading managers were aware of them.

A lower Dutch court in 2013 had found that Shell’s Dutch-based parent company could not be held liable for leakages of oil at its Nigerian subsidiary.

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Dutch court: Nigeria farmers can sue Shell in Netherlands

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Dutch court: Nigeria farmers can sue Shell in Netherlands

Screen Shot 2015-11-20 at 08.55.47[JURIST] The Hague Court of Appeals [official website] ruled Friday that the Royal Dutch Shell [corporate website] can be sued in a Dutch court for their involvement in oil leaks in Nigeria. The ruling [text, in Dutch] stems from a suit brought by four Nigerian farmers that claimed Shell and its Nigerian subsidiaries were responsible for oil leaks leading to their lands being damaged. In a statement explaining their reasoning for their decision, the Court of Appeals said, “It cannot be established in advance that the parent company is not liable for possible negligence of the Nigerian operating company.”

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Shell contests Dutch ruling on Nigerian spills

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Screen Shot 2015-11-20 at 08.55.47By Daniel J. Graeber: Dec. 18, 2015

THE HAGUE, Netherlands, Dec. 18 (UPI) — Dutch supermajor Shell said it was disappointed that a national court in The Hague has assumed jurisdiction over claims tied to oil spills in Nigeria.

Nigerian farmers said Royal Dutch Shell and the Shell Petroleum Development Company of Nigeria are liable for damages caused by leaking oil pipelines during a three-year period ending in 2007. The parent company said it has no liability for the actions of its subsidiary and that the Dutch court system holds no authority over the case.

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Dutch appeals court says Shell may be held liable for oil spills in Nigeria

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Nigerian farmers affected by oil pollution get green light to pursue case against Anglo–Dutch multinational as judges order release of key documents

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Friends of the Earth activists hold a banner supporting civil action taken by Nigerian farmers whose livelihoods were affected by leaking pipelines in the oil-rich Niger delta. Photograph: Peter Dejong/AP

Reuters: Friday 18 December 2015 13.33 GMT

A Dutch appeals court ruled on Friday that Royal Dutch Shell can be held liable for oil spills at its subsidiary in Nigeria, potentially opening the way for other compensation claims against the multinational.

Judges in The Hague ordered Shell to make available to the court documents that might shed light on the cause of the oil spills and whether leading managers were aware of them.

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Shell’s Bay Day in the Dock

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Ken Saro-Wiwa must be chuckling at this turn of events. In his last testament before his execution 20 years ago, Saro-Wiwa declared that Shell will one day be in the dock. Now, the presence of Shell in the dock is not only happening but will pick up speed.

December 18, 2015

The decision of the Appeal Court at The Hague on 18 December 2015 that the four farmers whose lands and creeks were damaged by Shell’s pollution can indeed sue the oil mogul in The Netherlands has come as refreshing news.

While this is a sweet step towards total victory, we are saddened that while the case drags on the polluted lands are yet to be remediated and the victims are still deprived of the use of their lands and creeks.

Shell’s oil spills in the Niger Delta are well known and the oil company’s claims that such spills are caused by third party interferences often ring hollow, if you know the real story. The history of the spin by Shell that oil spills from their facilities are caused by third parties has been on since the 1980s. Although there was a spike in such interferences between 2005 and 2009 due to armed responses in the region, much of the spills are still attributable to equipment failure or poor maintenance.

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Nigerian Farmers Cleared to Sue Shell in Dutch Court

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Screen Shot 2015-12-18 at 08.01.07By MIKE CORDER, ASSOCIATED PRESS: THE HAGUE, Netherlands — Dec 18, 2015

Nigerian farmers will have the chance to sue oil multinational Shell in a Dutch court for pollution they blame on leaking pipelines, a Dutch appeals court ruled Friday.

Activists said the ruling sets a landmark legal precedent that clears the way for Dutch-based companies to be sued for alleged negligence of their subsidiaries elsewhere in the world.

“There is now jurisprudence that means victims of human rights violations or pollution can sue Dutch multinationals in the Netherlands,” said Geert Ritsema of the Dutch arm of Friends of the Earth, the environmental group that is also involved in the case.

The case centers on a charge from four farmers that Shell and its Nigerian unit are liable for damages caused by leaks from two underground oil pipes from 2004-2007. Shell has argued that it has no liability in the case and that Dutch courts did not have jurisdiction.

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Dutch court to rule on landmark Nigerian case against Shell

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Screen Shot 2015-12-18 at 08.01.07FRIDAY 18 DECEMBER 2015

A Dutch appeals court is to rule Friday whether the country’s tribunals can hear a landmark case for damages brought by four Nigerians against oil giant Shell.

The four farmers and fishermen, backed by the Dutch branch of environmental group Friends of the Earth, first filed the case in 2008 against the Anglo-Dutch company in a court case thousands of kilometres from their homes.

They want Shell to clean up devastating oil spills in four heavily-polluted villages in the west African country’s oil-rich Niger Delta, prevent further spills and pay compensation.

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Shell terminates contract for infamous drillship

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Grant Rowles: DECEMBER 18, 2015

Noble Corporation has announced that Shell has terminated the contract for the drillship Noble Discoverer.

In its latest fleet status report, Noble said that “Shell has terminated the rig’s contract for convenience” and has agreed to pay the remaining term at approximately 90 percent of the operating dayrate “adjusted for certain other items.”

Shell committed to a three-year deal in late February 2014 at $368,000 per day for the drillship to be used for its failed Arctic drilling campaign…

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Again, Shell Faces Dutch Court over Niger Delta Oil Damage

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Screen Shot 2015-11-20 at 08.55.4716 Dec 2015

Amnesty International has said Shell could be exposed to a raft of compensation claims and be forced to disclose previously withheld internal documents over its failure to stop and clean up decades of oil pollution in a test case before the Dutch Court of Appeal on Friday.

According to a statement by the international human rights watchdog, the case is the latest attempt by Niger Delta communities to hold Shell to account, with the support of international non-governmental organisations (NGOs) including Amnesty International.

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Shell faces Dutch court for Niger Delta oil damage

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15 December 2015

The oil giant Shell could be exposed to a raft of compensation claims and be forced to disclose previously withheld internal documents over its failure to stop and clean up decades of oil pollution in a test case before the Dutch Court of Appeal on Friday.

The case is the latest attempt by Niger Delta communities to hold Shell to account, with the support of international NGOs including Amnesty International.

On Friday, the Dutch Court of Appeal is expected to rule on whether Shell Nigeria can be held liable in the Netherlands for its negligence in Nigeria and also decide on whether to allow the plaintiffs access to documents withheld by Shell. The case has been brought by Friends of the Earth on behalf of four farmers in the Niger Delta.

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Shell Bid Aims to Preserve U.S. Drilling Rights in Arctic Ocean

Screen Shot 2015-12-15 at 16.53.51Jennifer A Dlouhy: December 15, 2015: Bloomberg.com

  • Oil company files appeal challenging rejection by Interior

  • Clock now ticking on oil and gas leases expiring in 2020

Screen Shot 2015-11-03 at 08.42.45Royal Dutch Shell Plc is fighting to preserve U.S. drilling rights in Arctic waters three months after halting exploration indefinitely there because it failed to find meaningful oil or natural gas deposits.

Europe’s largest oil company filed a notice of appeal Tuesday challenging the U.S. Interior Department’s Oct. 29 rejection of the company’s requests to stop the clock on Arctic oil and gas leases that otherwise expire between 2017 and 2020. The dispute is expected to undergo an administrative review, possibly delaying a final judgment until after a new U.S. president takes office.

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Economics, not just regulation, sidelined Shell’s offshore Alaska drilling plans

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Screen Shot 2015-11-03 at 08.42.45Dermot ColeDecember 8, 2015

Fresh assertions that the Obama administration smothered Shell’s Arctic dreams followed the news that Statoil gave up on its leases, the second company to abandon plans to look for oil in the Chukchi Sea.

Citing market conditions and noting the leases “are no longer considered competitive within Statoil’s global portfolio,” the Norwegian company announced its withdrawal plans Nov. 17. The company had long taken a cautious approach in the region, using Shell as a bellwether. Earlier this year it had scaled back its plans to drill in the Barents Sea because of low oil prices.

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The Inside Story of Shell’s Arctic Assault

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Screen Shot 2015-11-03 at 08.42.45A months-long investigation shows how the energy giant pressured the Interior Department during the company’s gung-ho Arctic push—and got most of what it wanted (except oil).

By Barry YeomanDecember 08, 2015

Last May, four months before the oil giant Royal Dutch Shell suspended exploration in offshore Alaska, Christopher Putnam needed to get something off his chest.

Putnam is 44, originally from Texas, a trained wildlife biologist who also served as an Army infantry sergeant during the Iraq War. For almost six years he has worked in Alaska for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, protecting marine mammals. It has been his job to ensure that Shell’s plans to drill more than 60 miles offshore in the Chukchi Sea—the wild Arctic water between Alaska and Siberia—wouldn’t harm Pacific walruses, particularly the juveniles, calves, and nursing mothers that dominate the Chukchi during the drilling season.

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Ken Saro-Wiwa 20th Anniversary Commemoration

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Afri organised a protest at Shell HQ in Dublin on Nov. 10th to mark the 20th anniversary of the execution of the Ogoni 9. The execution of Ken Saro Wiwa and his colleagues was carried out by the Nigerian military dictatorship with the collusion of Shell. Shell’s disregard for human rights and the environment continues in Ogoniland and elsewhere throughout the world including Erris, Co. Mayo.

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Shell Forced to Scale Back Ambitions

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Screen Shot 2015-11-20 at 08.55.47By James StaffordThu, 26 November 2015

As with most oil companies, 2015 has been a rough year for Royal Dutch Shell. The Anglo-Dutch company reported a third quarter loss of $6 billion, which included $7.9 billion in impairment charges.

During its third quarter earnings call, Shell’s CEO Ben van Beurden summed up the company’s strategy, emphasizing restraint. “Grow to simplify” is how he put it. What that means in practice is scrapping the Arctic campaign; pulling out of the expensive Carmon Creek oil sands project in Canada; shedding assets in the less desirable parts of North American shale; selling assets elsewhere around the world, including Nigeria; and focusing on its merger with BG, which is a big bet on LNG.

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By Charles Mandel | November 25th 2015

Screen Shot 2015-11-20 at 08.55.47A handful of protesters from Sum of Us, Greenpeace, the Ecology Action and the Clean Ocean Action Committee delivered a massive 233,000-signature petition to the Canada-Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Board (CNSOPB) opposing what they said were extremely lax safety standards around Shell’s drilling program. Currently, if a subsea oil well blowout were to occur, the company would be allowed to take 12 to 13 days to contain it. Shell’s original proposal suggested it could take 21 days to get a capping stack to the site.

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Shell’s £22,500 fine for North Sea oil spill slammed as ‘paltry’ by campaigners

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Screen Shot 2015-11-21 at 00.19.03The World Wildlife Fund warned the size of the fine would ‘do little to deter future poor behaviour’

Shell apologised for the lack of information and said it was not a deliberate attempt to cover up the spill. 

Adam Barnett: 24 November 2015

A £22,500 fine imposed on the energy giant Shell as punishment for the worst North Sea oil spill in a decade has been dismissed as “paltry” by environmental campaigners.

The World Wildlife Fund (WWF) warned the size of the fine, for a company that earns billions, would “do little to deter future poor behaviour” by oil and gas companies to avoid more damage to the environment.

The leak from the Gannet Alpha platform in August 2011 was the worst in the region in 10 years and saw more than 200 tons of oil – about 1,300 barrels – flood into the sea. 

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Shell fined by Scottish court for 2011 North Sea oil spill

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“Despite being responsible for the worst North Sea spill in a decade, the level of the fine is literally a drop in the ocean when compared to the billions earned by Shell annually…” Screen Shot 2015-11-21 at 00.19.03

LONDON: Business News | Tue Nov 24, 2015 2:42pm GMT

Oil major Royal Dutch Shell (RDSa.L) was handed a 22,500 pound fine by a local Scottish court on Tuesday for a 2011 oil spill in the North Sea that was the largest in more than a decade.

A subsea pipeline leak from Shell’s Gannet Alpha field spilled more than 200 tonnes of oil into the central North Sea in August 2011. Aberdeen Sheriff Court imposed the fine after Shell pleaded guilty in the case.

The oil major has accepted the charge and said it had since carried out a review of its North Sea pipeline system and had applied lessons learned across its British operations.

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Shell handed £22,500 fine over August 2011 North Sea oil spill

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The company carried out a review of its North Sea pipeline system following the leak, which came from a subsea pipeline in the Gannet field in August 2011.

More than 200 tonnes of oil – about 1,300 barrels – entered the North Sea from the pipe about 112 miles east of Aberdeen after the problem was first detected on August 10.

The fine was handed down at Aberdeen Sheriff Court after Shell admitted two charges.

Paul Goodfellow, Shell’s upstream director, UK & Ireland, said: “We deeply regret the Gannet spill and accept the fine which has been handed down to us.

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