Royal Dutch Shell Plc  .com Rotating Header Image

Posts under ‘Oil Company Profits’

Investors’ fortunes transformed as Shell restores cash dividend

Royal Dutch Shell investors reaped the rewards of its “transformation” yesterday when it said that it would resume paying its entire $16 billion annual dividend in cash and would press ahead with at least $25 billion of share buybacks by 2020.

Europe’s biggest listed energy company has been saving cash over the past two and a half years by paying about a quarter of its dividend in the form of new shares, part of a strategy to help it to cope with the longest sustained downturn in oil prices for a generation. read more

Shell signals an end to the oil downturn with return of all-cash payouts

Jillian Ambrose: 

Royal Dutch Shell has signalled the end of the three-year oil market downturn by restarting its all-cash shareholder payouts as its cash flow begins to boom. The oil major began paying out dividends in the form of shares in 2015, in the wake of the oil price crash and its $50bn takeover of BG Group. But chief executive Ben van Beurden said the Anglo-Dutch group was now confident that it could call an end its scrip dividend as its cost-cutting and divestment programme pays off. The leaner business will also enable Shell to double down on its investment in ‘new energies’ including low-carbon fuels and renewable electricity. FULL ARTICLE read more

Shell signals return to pure cash dividend, focus on renewables

FILE PHOTO: Ben van Beurden, chief executive officer of Royal Dutch Shell, speaks during a news conference in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, February 15, 2016. REUTERS/Sergio Moraes /File Photo

Ron Bousso: NOVEMBER 18, 2017

LONDON (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell (RDSa.L) will return to paying pure cash dividends and step up its investment in cleaner energy as it turns a corner after more than two years of cost cuts and disposals prompted by weak oil prices. Shell Chief Executive Officer Ben van Beurden sought to strike a balance between reassuring investors it can increase returns in its core fossil fuel business during an “era of volatility” in oil prices while preparing to step up investments in renewables. FULL ARTICLE read more

Shell Updates Company Strategy and Financial Outlook

NEWS PROVIDED BY: Royal Dutch Shell plc

THE HAGUE, Netherlands, November 28, 2017/PRNewswire/ —

  • Scrip dividend programme to be cancelled with effect from the fourth quarter 2017 dividend
  • Annual organic free cash flow outlook increased to $25 to $30 billionby 2020, at $60 per barrel (real terms 2016)
  • Company sets ambition to reduce the net carbon footprint of its energy products in step with societys drive to align with the Paris Agreement goals

Royal Dutch Shell plc (Shell) (NYSE: RDS.A) (NYSE: RDS.B) Chief Executive Officer, Ben van Beurden, today updated investors on the company’s strategy, setting out plans to grow returns and free cash flow, and outlining its ambition to reduce the net carbon footprint of its energy products.

“Our next steps as we re-shape Shell into a world-class investment aim to ensure that our company can continue to thrive, not just in the short and medium term but for many decades to come,” said van Beurden. “These steps build on the foundations of Shell’s strong operational and financial performance, and my confidence in our strategy and our ability to deliver on the promises we make.” read more

Shell prepares to reward investors by restoring bigger cash payouts

Royal Dutch Shell introduced its scrip dividend programme in 2015 (Source: Getty)

Oliver Gill: Sunday 26 November 2017 6:14pm

Oil behemoth Royal Dutch Shell has been tipped to dish out more cash to investors as it scraps a programme of paying dividends in the form of shares. Analysts from UBS believe it is a case of “when not if” Shell restores a full cash dividend.

Shell chief executive Ben van Beurden is expected to signal the changes at a London management day on Tuesday.

The oil giant put a scrip dividend programme – where part of the firm’s dividend is paid by issuing new shares – in place in 2015 to reduce demands on cash as debt spiralled. Shell’s cash reserves were put under pressure by a combination of soft oil prices and a £47bn deal to buy gas producer BG. read more

Ben van Beurden prepares to restore Royal Dutch Shell cash dividend

Royal Dutch Shell is tipped to resume paying all its dividend in cash this week — unplugging a gusher worth billions of pounds for investors. Chief executive Ben van Beurden is expected to signal the move on Tuesday, when he lays out his vision for Britain’s most valuable public company. Abandoning the so-called scrip dividend programme would mark the latest stage in the Anglo-Dutch company’s recovery from the depths of the oil industry downturn. The company has paid a slice of its dividend in stock since early 2015, when the plunging oil price forced Van Beurden to marshal resources. read more

Norway Idea to Exit Oil Stocks Is ‘Shot Heard Around the World’

Norway’s proposal to sell off $35 billion in oil and natural gas stocks brings sudden and unparalleled heft to a once-grassroots movement to enlist investors in the fight against climate change. read more

Big Oil is under pressure, unloved and on sale

  • Norway wants to dump its stakes in oil and gas companies
  • Proposal adds to doubts over industry’s long-term outlook

Big Oil is under pressure, unloved and on sale.

Energy giants from Exxon Mobil Corp. to Royal Dutch Shell Plc are struggling back to their feet after a three-year oil slump, while also fighting to prove they can survive for decades to come amid an accelerating shift to clean energy. So getting dumped by the world’s biggest investment fund wouldn’t be welcome news.

Norway’s $1 trillion sovereign wealth fund said on Thursday that it wants to sell about $35 billion of shares in oil and gas companies to make the nation “less vulnerable” to a drop in crude prices. Global energy giants favored by long-term investors including Italy’s Eni SpA, PetroChina Ltd. and Russia’s Gazprom PJSC account for more than $20 billion of that total. read more

World’s Biggest Wealth Fund Wants Out of Oil and Gas

The $1 trillion fund that Norway has amassed pumping oil and gas over the past two decades wants out of petroleum stocks.  

Norway, which relies on oil and gas for about a fifth of economic output, would be less vulnerable to declining crude prices without its fund investing in the industry, the central bank said Thursday. The divestment would mark the second major step in scrubbing the world’s biggest wealth fund of climate risk, after it sold most of its coal stocks. The plan would entail the fund, which controls about 1.5 percent of global stocks, dumping as much as $40 billion of shares in international giants such as Exxon Mobil Corp. and Royal Dutch Shell Plc. The Finance Ministry said it will study the proposal and decide what to do in “fall of 2018” at the earliest. FULL ARTICLE read more

Norway shakes oil world by dumping investments

Norway is western Europe’s biggest oil producer and its giant sovereign wealth fund wants to reduce its exposure to oil which hit shares in BP and Royal Dutch Shell. Oil platforms in the Cromarty Firth, ScotlandANDREW MILLIGAN/PA

Norway’s giant sovereign wealth fund has unveiled plans to dump its entire holding in oil and gas companies in a $37 billion sell-off that was welcomed by campaign groups but put downward pressure on share prices. The $1 trillion fund, which manages the assets of the oil-rich nation, signalled its intent to prune its exposure to companies including BP and Royal Dutch Shell in a move aimed at making it less vulnerable to a permanent drop in the price of crude. SOURCE read more

Anger Seethes on Margins of Historic Oil Cleanup in Nigeria’s Delta

Bodo received support from British law firm Leigh Day, which negotiated a 55 million-pound pollution settlement with Shell in 2015.

Nearly a decade after two catastrophic oil spills in the Niger Delta, a comprehensive cleanup has finally been launched in the southern Nigerian region.

Oil companies and activists hope it will be a blueprint for wider rehabilitation, but other badly polluted communities are unhappy not to be included.

Earlier this month, crews of young men equipped with high-pressure hoses began to attack the crude oil that has blighted the creeks and mangrove swamps in the area where they live.

The workers from Bodo in Rivers State are beginning a three-year project that claims to mark a new approach to cleaning up the delta, the vast polluted swampland that pumps the oil vital to Africa’s largest economy. read more

Peak oil? Majors aren’t buying into the threat from renewables

Ernest Scheyder, Ron Bousso: NOVEMBER 8, 2017 HOUSTON/LONDON (Reuters) – Two decades ago, BP set out to transcend oil, adopting a sunburst logo to convey its plans to pour $8 billion over a decade into renewable technologies, even promising to power its gas stations with the sun. That transformation – marketed as “Beyond Petroleum” – led to manufacturing solar panels in Australia, Spain and the United States and erecting wind farms in the United States and the Netherlands. Today, BP (BP.L) might be more aptly branded “Back to Petroleum” after exiting or scaling back its renewable energy investments. Lower-cost Chinese components upended its solar panel business, which the firm shed in 2011. A year later, BP tried to sell its U.S. wind power business but couldn’t get a buyer. FULL ARTICLE

Shell Gears Up For Peak Gasoline

By Jon LeSage – Nov 07, 2017, 3:00 PM CST

Royal Dutch Shell is hedging its bets over the next two decades with expectations that motor fuel consumption will be diminishing and other markets rising.

Since the oil price plummet it 2014, Shell has transitioned its business model over to refining oil, offering other refined oil products, and producing petrochemicals. The oil giant will produce well beyond gasoline to serve other growing economic sectors, and to offset the role EVs will play by the 2030s. FULL ARTICLE read more

Why Royal Dutch Shell’s Value Increased by $10 Billion in October

Shell has had a great year, and October added to the up trend, even though there wasn’t much actual news.

Reuben Gregg Brewer (TMFReubenGBrewer) Nov 6, 2017 at 4:32PM

However, since around July and August, Shell has been on a tear. There are two parts to this solid showing. First, oil has been heading in a generally upward direction since about that point. Shell is a commodity company, so energy prices will be a big piece of the performance puzzle. But second, and perhaps more important, Shell appears to be executing well. For example, it has made material headway on its debt reduction goals, which is being driven by asset sales. The oil major has also notably improved its return on capital employed, which has been hindered in recent years by high-profile misses like a now-curtailed effort to drill in the Arctic. The company also posted strong second-quarter earnings results, which fellow Fool Tyler Crowe described at the time as “turn[ing] on the cash flow tap.” FULL ARTICLE read more

Shell Swallows BG Group Whole Hog, Rolls Up Cash Flow

Ray Merola: Nov. 6, 2017

Summary

  • Shell is enjoying a remarkably successful corporate resurgence.
  • Legacy BG Group opex and capex has been absorbed entirely without a loss of combined hydrocarbon volumes.
  • Cash is king.
  • Debt is trending down.  The dividend is well-covered.  Returns are solid, and improving.
  • I remain constructive on RDS stock.

FULL ARTICLE

Royal Dutch Shell: The Cash Machine

 Nov. 6, 2017 12:35 PM ET

Summary

  • Royal Dutch Shell has reported nearly 50% increase in profits following improvement in energy prices which fueled a turnaround of its upstream division.
  • In the first three quarters of 2017, Royal Dutch Shell generated $15.42 billion of free cash flows (ex. working cap. changes), surpassing even the industry’s cash flow king Exxon Mobil.
  • Oil prices have climbed to almost $61 a barrel and could stay at this level in the future, which could give a major boost to Shell’s earnings and cash flows.
  • read more

    %d bloggers like this: