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Shell Is Nothing Short Of Exemplary

Earnings Forecast Focus: Sep. 5, 2017 6:49 PM ET

Summary

  • Shell CEO Ben van Beurden’s “lower forever” quote was aimed at operating costs and overall company culture. It does not reflect the CEO’s oil price outlook.
  • The company’s operational excellence has been nothing short of exemplary.
  • Scrip dividend will be removed when gearing is down to 20% from the current 25%.
  • At the current rate, it should take no more than twelve months to reduce the gearing to 20%.
  • Obviously, the dividend is safe. More importantly, this is an opportunity to buy a company with excellent leadership.
  • read more

    Royal Dutch Shell In The Clear

    Back on May 24th I “sounded the all clear” on Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A) (NYSE:RDS.B). Shell, I felt, would henceforth be able to pay its dividends and capital expenditure from operational cash flow. Shell’s latest quarter was another continuation of that, with ongoing synergies from the huge BG Group acquisition two years ago and also continued opex savings. Shell’s pro-forma workforce is about 30% smaller than it was in the beginning of 2016, and while that may not be good for employees who were laid off, it is a reflection of impressive modernization and productivity gains from the company itself. This article takes a look at Shell’s ongoing cost-saving measures. This article also looks at the company’s updated cash flow situation, its dividend safety, and finally its valuation. FULL ARTICLE read more

    Shell paid $31 billion to Nigerian govt between 2002-2016 – Official

    Shell Petroleum Development Company (SPDC) remitted 29.8 billion dollars to the federation account and 1.2 billion dollars to Niger Delta Development Commission (NDDC) between 2002 and 2016, Igo Weli, General Manager, External Relations, made the disclosure on Monday. Mr. Weli spoke in Port Harcourt while reacting to the shut-down of SPDC flow station and gas plant in Belema community by angry youth. The youth accused the company of neglecting them and marginalising their community. Addressing journalists, Mr. Weli said the seizure of the company’s facilities by the youth would not only send wrong signal to the international community, but was capable of discouraging further investment in the Niger Delta. FULL ARTICLE read more

    Is Shell’s Lower Oil Forever Really So Unrealistic?

    “Royal Dutch Shell PLC’s chief executive drew a collective gasp with his “lower forever” comment as one recent story put it.”  Funny, in 2012 when I said at an OPEC conference that the price was likely to return to the $50-60 range, it was not even taken seriously enough for gasps:  the moderator actually thought I was joking, and an oil company CEO replied, ‘Well, you hate to call someone an idiot’ apparently unaware I’ve been called much, much worse. FULL ARTICLE WITH CHARTS read more

    The Secret Behind Better Oil Major Earnings

    By Gregory Brew – Aug 02, 2017, 6:00 PM CDT

    After several years of austerity and belt-tightening, the major international oil companies posted substantial profits in Q2 of 2017. The five largest private oil companies together generated more than $30 billion in profit, an indication that most have successfully adapted to the current bout of low prices, while a few have publicly indicated their belief that prices will hover around $50 for the foreseeable future.

    What this means is that the “mega projects” that dominated many companies’ balance sheets for the last decade will become increasingly rare, as the majors pivot towards short-term, low-risk ventures with a faster turnaround. read more

    Oil Companies at Last See Path to Profits After Painful Spell

    ABERDEEN, Scotland — This port city built of granite on the North Sea has taken a battering in recent years. Plunging oil prices hit the petroleum industry, which dominates the economy. Tens of thousands of jobs were slashed. Projects worth billions of dollars were sent back to the drawing board. Oil executives here now speak with a relief similar to survivors of a fierce storm. When oil prices fell, the industry scrambled to adjust. It initially relied on tried-and-true tactics: cutting jobs and investment. But then companies realized they had to go further, starting a far-reaching reworking of their businesses to embrace new technologies and construction methods to stretch each dollar just a little more. The result has been drastically lower operating costs and higher cash flows. Learning to live in a weaker oil price environment gives them upside if prices firm up. This shift was borne out in recent days as major oil companies, including Chevron, Exxon Mobil, Royal Dutch Shelland Total, reported much healthier results. FULL ARTICLE read more

    BP and Shell face huge challenge from switch to electric cars

    Emily Gosden, Energy Editor: 31 July 2017

    Oil investors are getting worried. Electric cars have accelerated on to the front pages. Sales are surging, carmakers are unveiling plans for all-electric models and this week Britain vowed to ban sales of petrol and diesel cars by 2040. Yet if Big Oil believes that death is about to pull up in a Tesla, it’s doing a good job of hiding it. On Thursday, Ben van Beurden, the boss of Royal Dutch Shell, welcomed Britain’s plans and declared that his next car would be electric. And earlier in the year Spencer Dale, BP’s chief economist, bluntly described the arrival of electric vehicles on the oil majors’ lawn as “not a game-changer”, adding that not even “enormous” growth in sales of such vehicles would make a big dent in global oil demand. As Big Oil evolves into Big Energy, the sight of Mr van Beurden behind the wheel of an electric vehicle might not seem so crazy, so long as he’s charging it up on a Shell forecourt. read more

    OPEC’s Existential Sucker Punch

    Julian Lee: July 30, 2017 3:00 AM EDT

    You wait decades for an existential crisis, then two come along at once. At least that’s how it must feel for OPEC’s beleaguered ministers. In the short term the market for their oil is being eroded by rising production outside their control. Looking further ahead, oil demand itself is under threat from the electrification of road transport. OPEC may not yet be dead, but its days are surely numbered. The most obvious short-term threat to the group comes from the rapid rise in U.S. shale oil, but the risks have expanded to include other areas like Brazil’s prolific sub-salt discoveries and more recent finds further north along the east coast of South America. FULL ARTICLE read more

    The electric jolt that roused Big Oil

    Jillian Ambrose: 

    Identifying a tipping point is not always easy. But when one of the world’s most powerful oil bosses says he is in the market for an electric car, there can be little doubt. Ben van Beurden, the Royal Dutch Shell boss, last week delivered the clearest indication yet that the burgeoning electric vehicle industry is already hastening the decline of global oil demand. “When that will be is not certain. But that it will happen, we are certain,” he told investors. It was not so much a foil to the group trebling second quarter profits as a statement of intent: for “Big Oil” it is time to adapt or die, and Shell intends to adapt. READ MORE read more

    Cheap oil forcing a rethink, says Royal Dutch Shell

    • The Wall Street Journal

    Royal Dutch Shell has presented a pessimistic vision for the future of oil, even as the company reported success in generating cash during a prolonged energy downturn. Shell has cut costs and said it was preparing for a world in which crude prices might never regain precrash levels and petroleum demand declined. Shell chief executive Ben van Beurden said the company had a mindset that oil prices would remain “lower forever”. “We have to have projects that are resilient in a world where oil has peaked,” Mr van Beurden told reporters on a conference call discussing the company’s second-quarter financial results. “When it will happen we don’t know, but that it will happen we are certain.” READ MORE read more

    Shell preparing for world economy that shifts away from oil

    By DANICA KIRKA Associated Press

    Royal Dutch Shell is planning for the day when demand for oil starts fading as major economies move away from oil and increasingly turn to electric-powered cars, Chief Executive Ben van Beurden said Thursday. Van Beurden welcomed recent proposals to phase out passenger vehicles powered by fossil fuels in Britain and France, saying they are needed to combat global warming. Shell is looking at “very aggressive scenarios” as it makes plans to remain competitive in a world that gets more of its energy from renewable sources and less from crude oil, or “liquids,” he said. “The most aggressive scenario – much more aggressive than what we are seeing at the moment, by the way – with maximum policy effect, with maximum innovation effect, can see us peaking in liquids consumption somewhere in the early thirties,” he said as Shell reported second-quarter earnings. FULL ARTICLE read more

    Shell gets everything right except producing oil

    Andy Critchlow: JULY 27, 2017

    LONDON (Reuters Breakingviews) – Royal Dutch Shell is great at producing profit, but less so at producing oil. The Anglo-Dutch energy giant has more than tripled its earnings in the second quarter, helped by the strong performance of its downstream refining business and recovering prices. With its debt falling too, the company is doing the right things for shareholders – except in the crucial area of pumping more fuel.

    At first glance, Shell’s financial performance suggests that three years in the doldrums for big oil majors may have come to an end. On Thursday, the company reported an impressive 245 percent year-on-year rebound in clean earnings to $3.6 billion for the three-month period ending in June. Prices, which recovered from a slump last January below $30 per barrel, have helped, but there is more to it. FULL ARTICLE read more

    Europe’s Oil Giants Recover From Three-Year Slump

    Shell profits surge as Van Beurden puts focus on ‘discipline’

    By Press Association: 

    Royal Dutch Shell has reported a large rise in second quarter profits after the energy giant was boosted by higher oil and gas prices. The firm said adjusted earnings rose from $1.05bn (£800m) to $3.6bn, an increase of 245pc, as chief executive Ben van Beurden said he was making progress on “reshaping the company”. “Cash generation has been resilient over four consecutive quarters, at an average oil price of just under $50 per barrel,” Mr Van Beurden said. “The external price environment and energy sector developments mean we will remain very disciplined, with an absolute focus on the four levers within our control, namely capital efficiency, costs, new project delivery, and divestments. “I am confident that we are on track to deliver a world-class investment to our shareholders.” The figures were flattered by a disastrous second quarter in 2016, when it was stung by depressed crude prices and costs linked to its takeover of BG Group. FULL ARTICLE read more

    Shell Profits Triple on Stronger Refining, Oil Prices

    Shell CEO Ben van Beurden

    LONDON — Royal Dutch Shell more than tripled its profits in the second quarter to beat forecasts boosted by strong refining operations and a rise in oil prices. The Anglo-Dutch oil and gas company also reported a huge recovery in cash flow to $12.2 billion and a drop in debt as its cost reduction efforts in recent years paid off. It has sold some $25 billion of assets since acquiring BG Group last year. The strong results came despite a dip in oil and gas production versus the previous quarter as a result of reduced output from a facility in Qatar. “The external price environment and energy sector developments mean we will remain very disciplined, with an absolute focus on the four levers within our control,” Chief Executive Ben van Beurden said. READ MORE read more

    Royal Dutch Shell’s earnings more than triple in 2Q

    By Associated Press July 27 at 2:53 AM

    LONDON — Royal Dutch Shell says second-quarter earnings more than tripled as it benefited from a cost-cutting drive and recovering oil prices.The Anglo-Dutch energy giant said Thursday that profit adjusted for changes in the value of inventories and excluding one-time items rose to $3.60 billion from $1.05 billion in the same period last year. Net income rose 31 percent to $1.55 billion.CEO Ben van Beurden says the earnings reflect Shell’s restructuring to cope with lower oil prices and the purchase of natural gas producer BG Group. Shell’s oil price averaged $45.62 a barrel for the quarter, up 16 percent from a year earlier. Prices were above $100 a barrel as recently as 2014. Van Beurden says the “external price environment and energy sector developments mean we will remain very disciplined.” read more

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