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Posts Tagged ‘Alternative Energy’

Shift to Hydrogen Could Meet 20% of World Energy Needs by 2050

Shell, Statoil and BMW among companies urging support for fuel

Transition requires investment of up to $25 billion a year

The most abundant element may supply almost a fifth of global energy by 2050 and eliminate enough emissions to cancel out all the pollution in the U.S., according to a group of industrial companies from Royal Dutch Shell Plc to Toyota Motor Corp. FULL ARTICLE

Peak oil? Majors aren’t buying into the threat from renewables

Ernest Scheyder, Ron Bousso: NOVEMBER 8, 2017 HOUSTON/LONDON (Reuters) – Two decades ago, BP set out to transcend oil, adopting a sunburst logo to convey its plans to pour $8 billion over a decade into renewable technologies, even promising to power its gas stations with the sun. That transformation – marketed as “Beyond Petroleum” – led to manufacturing solar panels in Australia, Spain and the United States and erecting wind farms in the United States and the Netherlands. Today, BP (BP.L) might be more aptly branded “Back to Petroleum” after exiting or scaling back its renewable energy investments. Lower-cost Chinese components upended its solar panel business, which the firm shed in 2011. A year later, BP tried to sell its U.S. wind power business but couldn’t get a buyer. FULL ARTICLE

Shell Gears Up For Peak Gasoline

By Jon LeSage – Nov 07, 2017, 3:00 PM CST

Royal Dutch Shell is hedging its bets over the next two decades with expectations that motor fuel consumption will be diminishing and other markets rising.

Since the oil price plummet it 2014, Shell has transitioned its business model over to refining oil, offering other refined oil products, and producing petrochemicals. The oil giant will produce well beyond gasoline to serve other growing economic sectors, and to offset the role EVs will play by the 2030s. FULL ARTICLE read more

Threat to pensions if BP and Shell find themselves extinct


Stop crude focus on oil profits: The Guardian: Article by Sean Farrell: Sunday 29 October 2017

At the start of last year, Britain’s big oil companies, Shell and BP, appeared to be in crisis. A slump in the price of Brent crude – from more than $110 a barrel in 2014 to less than $30 in January 2016 – sent profits tumbling and appeared to threaten dividends. After painful cost cuts and a partial recovery in the oil price to near $60, the pressure has eased and both are expected to report solid first-half results this week.

BP goes first, on Tuesday, with Shell, the stronger of the two, on Thursday. The commotion over the oil slump diverted some attention from their commitments to low-carbon energy. To much fanfare, both companies’ boards supported resolutions at their 2015 annual meetings that required clearer reporting of emissions, business risks and efforts to develop green energy sources. read more

Clock ticking down on deadline for Shell Springboard entries

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Entrants will be competing for a green cash pot containing £350,000, with the national winner to receive £150,000. A further five regional winners will each get £40,000 of no-strings attached funding.

They will also be given access to academics and investors whose advice can help grow their enterprises. The cut-off date for applications falls on November 6.

Former winners include Edinburgh-based tidal energy technology developer Nova Innovation. Shell UK country chair Sinead Lynch said: “Since 2005, Shell Springboard has provided £4million of equity-free funding to almost 100 innovative low-carbon enterprises in the UK. FULL ARTICLE read more

Planning for a green future

Since 2011, Shell has worked closely with the Development Research Center of the State Council on the country’s energy development strategy. (We have) identified key challenges facing the country and suggested detailed, practical solutions.

Through collaboration, we have also examined the important role natural gas can play in helping China diversify its energy mix. At the same time, it will boost economic development, improve air quality and help reduce carbon emissions.

Shell continues to promote the role of natural gas. Compared with coal, it emits around half the CO2s and less than one-tenth of the air pollutants when used to produce electricity. read more

Shell buys NewMotion charging network in first electric vehicle deal

Karolin Schaps: OCTOBER 12, 2017 / 1:23 PM

AMSTERDAM (Reuters) – Royal Dutch Shell (RDSa.L) has agreed to buy Dutch-based NewMotion, the owner of one of Europe’s largest electric vehicle charging networks, marking the company’s first deal in electric mobility as demand for cleaner vehicles is expected to soar. Shell said NewMotion, which manages over 30,000 charging points for electric vehicles in Western Europe and offers access to thousands more, will operate in parallel to Shell’s program of rolling out fast charging points at its forecourts. “They’re complementary offers. One is fast charging on the go on the forecourt and the other is a slightly slower rate of charge at the workplace or at home. At this stage there are no plans to integrate the two,” Shell’s vice-president for new fuels, Matthew Tipper, told journalists. Shell is installing electric vehicle charging points at retail stations in Britain, the Netherlands, Norway and the Philippines. FULL ARTICLE read more

Shell to enter Turkey’s retail electricity market

The global energy giant has operated in Turkey since the foundation of the Republic in 1923. Now, it is planning to expand its operations in natural gas, electricity and non-carbon energy. For electricity generation, the company is looking to benefit from renewable energy sources. Shell runs its natural gas and electricity supply operations under Shell Energy, which is currently expanding its businesses in Europe and Turkey. Highlighting that Shell has been involved in electricity wholesale business since 2014, the head of Shell Energy Europe, David Wells, elaborated on the company’s plans for 2018. FULL ARTICLE read more

Interview – Shell Netherlands CEO: More large wind projects wanted

Toby SterlingStefano Berra: OCTOBER 5, 2017

AMSTERDAM (Reuters) – As the Netherlands struggles to meet its renewable energy goals, Shell’s country chief executive sees its role as the architect of big, high-risk projects such as wind turbine farms — for the time being.

In an interview, Marjan van Loon said Shell had joined a coalition of companies urging the Dutch government to greatly increase its ambitions for offshore wind farms from its current plan for 5 tenders of 700 megawatt farms. read more

Shell to Seek Sale of Stake in $1.4 Billion Wind Farm

Royal Dutch Shell Plc and its partners Eneco Holdings NV and Mitsubishi Corp. are seeking to sell a stake in two Dutch offshore wind-farm projects that may cost $1.4 billion to develop, two people familiar with the plan said. The move would allow the companies to scale back financial exposure to the wind farms and redeploy the cash in new projects with the potential for higher returns. Shell has said only that it is trying to draw in additional investors, refusing to detail what that may entail. Its strategy is to focus on developing the early stages of gigantic wind farms and avoid holding the assets as long term operations, which offers a steady but slower payback. FULL ARTICLE read more

Shell takes cautious approach to green energy transition

by Andrew Ward, Energy Editor: 1 Oct 2017

Mr van Beurden, chief executive of Shell, allows himself only the briefest self-congratulation. “All the milestones, we are either ahead or on track,” he tells the Financial Times, referring to targets set at the time of the takeover. “But you are never done in this industry because everything is always in continuous decline.” The Dutchman is talking about the relentless pressure to find new resources… FULL ARTICLE

Shell plans $1B/year toward electric vehicle charging, energy management

|By: , SA News Editor

  • Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A, RDS.B) is working on developing new energy technologies such as smart electric vehicle charging and models to reduce customers’ energy use, says Mark Gainsborough, head of the company’s New Energies division.
  • Goldman Sachs has predicted that oil demand could peak as early as 2024 due to the rollout of electric vehicles and rising fuel prices, and Shell says it plans to invest up to $1B/year through the New Energies division by the end of the decade as it seeks to ramp up involvement in technologies that are changing the market.
  • Gainsborough says Shell already has started to provide fast-charging for electric vehicles at its gasoline stations and is working on developing “smart charging” to help even out demand on the electricity grid.
  • read more

    Shell Electric Car Chargers

    Shell, one of the largest oil and gas companies in the world, is going electric. Photos uploaded this week show how the company’s new electric car chargers look in reality — and it looks like something out of a sci-fi film. 

    The Shell Recharge stations, as they are branded, are 50 kWh direct current chargers that can recharge a car’s battery to around 80 percent in 30 minutes. The stations will initially be available at 10 service stations this year in the United Kingdom, around the London, Reading and Derby areas. They support Chademo, CCS and AC Type 2 charging connectors, and the company plans to provide Tesla adaptors in the future. read more

    Dyson to make electric cars from 2020

    Dyson, the engineering company best known for its vacuum cleaners and fans, plans to spend £2bn developing a “radical” electric car. The battery-powered vehicle is due to be launched in 2020. Dyson says 400 staff have been working on the secret project for the past two years at its headquarters in Malmesbury, Wiltshire.

    However, the car does not yet exist, with no prototype built, and a factory site is yet to be chosen. Sir James declined to give further details of the project. “Competition for new technology in the automotive industry is fierce and we must do everything we can to keep the specifics of our vehicle confidential,” he told staff in an email. read more

    It’s Not Just The CEO’s Car: Shell Converts Corporate Fleet To Plug-In Hybrids

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    Shell CEO Ben van Beurden made headlines worldwide when he told an interviewer in July that his next car would be an electric vehicle, but he stopped short of a full disclosure: van Beurden’s new car is part of a company-wide conversion of the corporate fleet.

    Shell Technology Director Harry Brekelmans clarified this month that he too is getting a plug-in vehicle, though it’s a hybrid:

    “Indeed Ben’s next car is electrical, but what he also says time and again is that fossil fuels will remain a part of the energy mix for decades to come, so his next car’s a hybrid, not a full EV,” Brekelmans said in appearance at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “And I know because my next car also will be a hybrid, because we’re changing the corporate fleet.” read more

    Shell plans UK’s first ‘no-petrol’ station as journey towards clean motoring continues

    Jillian Ambrose: 

    Royal Dutch Shell is preparing to open Britain’s first “no-petrol” service station in the capital next year as part of its drive towards cleaner motoring.

    The forecourt is expected to offer motorists biofuels, electric vehicle charge points and hydrogen cell refuelling instead of traditional petrol and diesel pumps. Meanwhile, the buildings are due to be powered by ­renewable energy from solar panels on the forecourt roof.

    Sources close to the Anglo-Dutch oil giant told The Telegraph that a central London site had been chosen, but the project was still at a very early stage. A spokesman for Shell declined to comment. read more

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