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Royal Dutch Shell Iranian treachery

Royal Dutch Shell is once again funding a fanatical regime intent on the extermination of the Jewish people. Iran is bent on developing nuclear weapons to destroy Israel, finishing the job that Shell’s former Nazi partners embarked upon, killing millions of Jews in the Holocaust.

By John Donovan

According to a Reuters article published on Thursday: “Companies are still finding ways to buy Iranian oil. Royal Dutch Shell and some Italian and Spanish refiners buy Iranian barrels with finance coming from Chinese and Italian banks…”

As a result of previous signals from Shell, it seemed that the company had ceased trading with the fanatical Iranian regime supplying road side bombs, which have maimed and killed many US and British soldiers.

Even the Donovan’s, well versed in the duplicity, deceit and trickery of Shell, thought the company had ended its trading with Iran. We should have known better.

On 28 October 2010, Shell CFO Simon Henry (above right) came clean after press reports on the subject and admitted that Shell has continued to trade with Iran:

“Simon Henry, Shell’s top financial official, said his company was still taking delivery of Iranian crude oil under the terms of its existing contracts with the Islamic republic.” (extract from UPI article)

Articles reported that Shell had stopped selling gasoline to Iran. No mention was made at the time that Shell was surreptitiously continuing to buy oil from the Iranians. Shell used subterfuge to disguise shipping movements. Basically Royal Dutch Shell has has continued to fund the military ambitions of an evil rogue regime, just as it did in funding the Nazis. We all know the dreadful consequences. Shell conspired directly with Hitler, was anti-Semitic and sold out its own Jewish employees to the Nazis.

Royal Dutch Shell Nazi Secrets

Royal Dutch Shell is once again funding a fanatical regime intent on the extermination of the Jewish people. Iran is bent on developing nuclear weapons to destroy Israel, finishing the job that Shell’s former Nazi partners embarked upon, killing millions of Jews in the Holocaust.

Royal Dutch Shell supported, encouraged and funded the Nazis, thereby being partly responsible for World War II. Its reckless greed is now in danger of bringing about A THIRD WORLD WAR, with even more catastrophic consequences.

We have printed below extracts from the “United Against Nuclear Iran” website, which contains links to related correspondence with Michiel Brandjes, Company Secretary & General Counsel, Royal Dutch Shell Plc., and extracts from some revealing articles.

“United Against Nuclear Iran (UANI) is a non-partisan, non-profit advocacy organization that seeks “to prevent Iran from fulfilling its ambition to become a regional super-power possessing nuclear weapons.” (Wikipedia Description)

“Total SA (TOT) and Royal Dutch Shell PLC (RDSB.LN) discreetly contacted Iranian authorities last week, seeking to reassure the Islamic Republic after telling the U.S. they have no plans for further investments for now, people familiar with the matter said in recent days. Total and Shell contacted Iran as the U.S. announced commitments by the companies “to terminate their investments and avoid any new activity in Iran’s energy sector.” The disclosure was made by the State Department in a Sept. 30 press release, which also said Statoil ASA (STO) and Eni SpA (E) had made similar commitments. Though the two companies are not breaching any sanctions in communicating with Iran, the contacts suggest they have not renounced their long-term ambitions in Iran, which hosts the world’s second-largest natural gas resources and stands as the fourth-largest global oil exporter….Total and Shell still do some direct business with Iran, regularly buying crude oil from the Middle Eastern country. But the Anglo-Dutch oil company has come under pressure for the trades, which are not prohibited under European sanctions.” (Wall Street Journal, “Total, Shell Keep Line Open With Tehran Despite US Claim,” 10/8/2010)

“Open sources reported that Royal Dutch Shell sold gasoline to Iran in 2009, but subsequently stopped in 2009.” (U.S. Government Accountability Office, Report: “Firms Reported in Open Sources to Have Sold Iran Refined Petroleum Products between January 1, 2009 and June,” September 3, 2010)

On September 30th, Shell made a “pledge to stop investing in Iran’s energy sector” as a result of pressure from American sanctions (AP, “US hits Iranian energy firm with sanctions,” 9/30/2010).

“Shell, the Anglo-Dutch oil giant, paid the state-owned Iranian oil company at least $1.5bn (£0.94bn) for crude oil this summer, increasing its business with Tehran as the international community implemented some of the toughest sanctions yet aimed at constricting the Islamic republic’s economy and its lifeline oil business.” (The Guardian, “Shell increases oil trade with Iran — despite sanctions,” 9/27/2010)

“Royal Dutch Shell resumed its gasoline shipments to Iran, International Oil Daily reported this morning.  The company got back into business with the Iranian regime after a six-month hiatus. The move is a slap at the U.S. Congress, which has been working to develop energy sanctions that could curtail the regime’s nuclear weapons program, human rights abuses, and support for terrorism.

Shell delivered three 30,000-ton shipments of gasoline last month to Iran’s Bandar Abbas port. The company’s last known shipment to Iran was recorded in October 2009.

Shell now appears to be exploiting Congress’ delay [in imposing sanctions], and is perhaps betting that the United Nations, the Europeans, or indeed the Obama administration will never pull the trigger on meaningful sanctions.

The Dutch firm’s calculus appears to be based purely on profits. Shell is trying to squeeze as many petrodollars it can from the Iranian regime before sanctions take hold. According to The New York Times, the company is still profiting from a 1999 deal signed to develop two oil fields in Iran that became fully operational in 2005.

Shell should come under intense scrutiny by the Obama administration and Congress once sanctions are passed.  In 2009 alone, Shell received $2.4 billion in contracts from the Federal government.”

(Forbes.com, “Inside Shell’s Iran Game,” 6/3/2010).

“An oil tanker named Front Page, chartered by Royal Dutch Shell PLC, left this port on March 17 and reported it was going to another U.A.E. port, then on to Saudi Arabia, ship-tracking data show.

But the tracking information reveals that Front Page also made an unreported stop—to the coast of Iran. There it loaded Iranian oil, according to records obtained by oil traders and shipping sources.

The incident, some oil-industry experts say, is an example of how some companies these days are hiding their business dealings with Iran, even when they are perfectly legal because they aren’t subject to any sanctions…

Still, given all the controversy over Iran’s nuclear program, many companies decline to discuss their Iranian oil purchases. Companies like Shell and BP have said they have stopped selling gasoline to Iran.

But they rarely mention that they continue to buy crude or other Iranian oil products, which generally is a much larger and more lucrative business than gasoline deliveries.” (The Wall Street Journal. “Oil Trade with Iran Thrives, Discreetly,” 5/20/10)

“Royal Dutch Shell signed an $800 million deal in 1999 to develop two huge oil fields expected to produce 190,000 barrels a day, and while that project was completed in 2005, it continues to receive payments as a result of its work. Shell has a second Iranian natural gas development projects in the works, but officials said they are awaiting the results of a feasability study before determining whether they will go forward with it. In the meantime, the company continues to supply oil lubricant to Iran, and until recently, had been a large supplier of gasoline to Iran. Shell is also a huge supplier of gasoline to the American military, won drilling rights in the Gulf of Mexico and in the Western United States, and shares with a company in China a $200,000 Export-Import Bank loan to build a petrochemical plant in that country. A Shell spokesman, David R. Williams, said that while the company would comply with any new international sanctions, Shell’s activities are not prohibited by European countries, adding that when the rules of different countries conflict “it makes compliance difficult.”  From 2000-2009, the company was the recipient of $11.2 billion US federal funds.  Their investments in Iran are currently active.  They have been listed as a potential violator of the Iran Sanctions Act.  (The New York Times, “Profiting from Iran, and the US,” 3/6/2010)

“Royal Dutch Shell PLC said Wednesday it is no longer selling gasoline to Iran, the latest oil company to make such a move during threats of tougher sanctions against the Islamic republic.

‘Shell is not currently selling gasoline to Iran,’ a company spokesman said. He declined to comment on whether it was related to sanctions against Iran.

Shell’s move comes as a number of Western oil companies have decided to stop trading with Iran as international pressure bites deeper into its oil and gas industry. Traders Vitol Holding BV and Glencore International AG, historically key fuel-oil suppliers to Iran, recently decided to halt sales of gasoline to the country.” (The Wall Street Journal, “Shell Stops Gas Sales to Iran,” 3/10/10)

“Royal Dutch Shell signed an $800 million deal in 1999 to develop two huge oil fields expected to produce 190,000 barrels a day, and while that project was completed in 2005, it continues to receive payments as a result of its work. Shell has a second Iranian natural gas development projects in the works, but officials said they are awaiting the results of a feasability study before determining whether they will go forward with it. In the meantime, the company continues to supply oil lubricant to Iran, and until recently, had been a large supplier of gasoline to Iran. Shell is also a huge supplier of gasoline to the American military, won drilling rights in the Gulf of Mexico and in the Western United States, and shares with a company in China a $200,000 Export-Import Bank loan to build a petrochemical plant in that country. A Shell spokesman, David R. Williams, said that while the company would comply with any new international sanctions, Shell’s activities are not prohibited by European countries, adding that when the rules of different countries conflict ‘it makes compliance difficult.’”

From 2000 through March 2010, Royal Dutch Shell has been the recipient of $11.2 billion in U.S. federal funds, despite being a “possible violator of the Iran Sanctions Act.” (The New York Times, “Profiting from Iran, and the U.S.“, 3/6/10)

“New York State Comptroller Thomas P. DiNapoli also announced Tuesday the $110 billion fund would freeze an additional $300 million in seven other companies…The decision comes after two years of reviewing these companies, the potential risk of the investments and, in some cases, humanitarian efforts in these countries. ‘We don’t expect our investments to benefit regimes that support genocide and terrorism,’ said DiNapoli…The fund also plans to monitor and prohibit further investment in ENI (E), Repsol YPF (REP), Royal Dutch Shell PLC (RDSA), Total SA (TOT), ABB Ltd. (ABB), Alstom (ALO.FR) and Snam Rete Gas (SNMRY). Additionally, it plans to focus on other industries including telecommunications.” (The Wall Street Journal, “NY Comptroller To Divest $86.2M In State Pension Fund Investments,” 6/30/09)

“Another step the Obama administration should take is to sustain American pressure on foreign banks and oil companies to halt their dealings with Iran’s energy sector. This effort has led such major firms as Germanys Deutsche Bank and Commerzbank, Englands HSBC, Credit Suisse and Royal Dutch Shell to halt or limit their business with Iran.” (The Baltimore Sun, “Facing the Iranian Threat,” 12/9/08)

“U.S. outreach to foreign banks and to oil companies considering investing in Iran’s energy sector has reportedly convinced more than 80 banks and several major potential oil-field investors to cease all or some of their business with Iran. Among them: Germanys two largest banks (Deutsche Bank and Commerzbank), London-based HSBC, Credit Suisse, Norwegian energy company StatoilHydro, and Royal Dutch Shell.” (The Wall Street Journal, “How To Put The Squeeze On Iran,” 11/13/08)

“William Burns, U.S. Under Secretary of State for political affairs, pointed out that several big energy companies, including Total, Shell, ENI and Repsol, have scaled back their business in Iran over the past few years.” (Reuters, “US to review if Statoil violates Iran sanctions law,” 7/9/08)

“Total, Shell and Repsol of Spain are hanging back from signing contracts, which the Iranians are desperate for them to sign, said Simon Henderson, an oil expert at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy.” (Associated Press, “Iran looks to tap key oil field with homegrown crews,” 5/11/08)

“In January [2007], Shell and Spains Repsol signed a preliminary deal with Teheran jointly to develop two phases of South Pars. At the time, Shell said it might be a year away from knowing whether to proceed, a timescale that Shell chief executive Jeroen van de Veer repeated six months later.” (The Daily Telegraph, “Shell delays decision on Iran project again,” 12/29/07)

“The Teacher Retirement System of Texas investment portfolio includes 19 companies that do business with Iran. The most familiar company names: Royal Dutch Shell, Mitsubishi Heavy Industry and Samsung Engineering.” (San Antonio Express-News, “TRS, ERS miss 30-day deadline to formulate Iran-divestment plan,” 11/18/07)

Listed by U.S. Government as doing business in Iran. (U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, “List of Companies Doing Business With State Sponsors Of Terror,” Removed from the Internet in July 2007)

“While U.S. companies have long been barred from operating in Iran, more than 200 multinationals have investments there, from British-Dutch oil giant Royal Dutch Shell PLC and French telecommunications-equipment company Alcatel SA to Swedens electronics company Telefon AB L.M. Ericsson.” (The Wall Street Journal, “Should states sell stocks to protest links to Iran,” 6/14/07)

“GIANTS WITH A FOOT IN TEHRAN: Total, Shell, Statoil, BNP Paribas, Commerzbank, MTN, UPS, Linde, Technip, Nokia, Ericsson, Peugeot, Renault, OMV, Societe Generale, ENI, Mitsubishi, Sumitomo, Siemens, LG, Samsung, Bosch, Valeo, Nestle, Unilever, BAT, Japan Tobacco.” (The London Times, “American pressure threatens UK firms,” 5/27/06)

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