Royal Dutch Shell Plc  .com Rotating Header Image

Posts Tagged ‘Ann Pickard’

Kiobel Writ: Shell and the Abacha regime operated a joint intelligence service

The extent of Shell’s infiltration of Nigerian politics later became clear from the messages from the American embassy in Nigeria published by WikiLeaks. In them Executive Vice President of Shell in Africa at the time, Ann Pickard, boasted to the American ambassador that the Nigerian government had forgotten that Shell had seconded people to every ministry in the Nigerian government and was therefore aware of everything happening there

By John Donovan

The numbered paragraphs below are extracted from the 138 page Esther Kiobel Writ served on multiple Royal Dutch Shell companies on 28 June 2017. More information about the latest litigation, this time in the Dutch Courts, is provided after the extracts. As can be seen in the footnotes, the allegations are supported by volumous evidence.

Shell and the Abacha regime operated in tandem

Extracts begin:

8.4.4 Shell and the regime operated a joint intelligence service

267. Together with the State Security Service (“SSS”, the national intelligence and security service) Shell maintained its own network of informants. According to George Ukpong, Shell had daily contact with the commissioner of police of Rivers State and the director of the SSS in this period.362 The SSS, according to Upkong, “is one of the security agencies rendering valuable assistance in support of SPDC security operations in the state”; the SSS “has provided assistance in meeting some of our staff training needs” and “has been of particular assistance to [Shell] in the area of crime intelligence acquisition”. read more

Shell’s own goals in the Arctic: Over to you, Ann

Screen Shot 2014-08-06 at 09.25.26US authorities say a desire to avoid taxes lead Shell to move an oil rig in rough seas in 2012, which lead to its grounding.

Extract from an article published in The Sydney Morning Herald, 3 November 2014

When Ann Pickard says how sorry she is to be leaving the Westpac board after its shareholder meeting next month – just three years after taking her seat – there is no doubting her sincerity.

Chairman Lindsay Maxsted says that following the former Shell Australia boss’s “executive relocation to the US and expectations that her commitments in North America (as head of Shell’s Arctic operations) will increase in 2015, Ms Pickard reluctantly chose to retire from the board”. read more

Australia: Departing Shell boss calls for leadership

Screen Shot 2013-06-19 at 22.29.32

Screen Shot 2013-06-24 at 07.54.18Peter Klinger, The West Australian June 24, 2013, 7:30 am

Outgoing Shell Australia chair-woman Ann Pickard will use her last visit to Canberra today to plead for a return to political leadership capable of making “the important and hard decisions required” to keep the country internationally competitive.

Evoking the examples of reformist former prime ministers Robert Menzies, Bob Hawke, Paul Keating and John Howard, Ms Pickard will use her address to a Committee for Economic Development of Australia function to call for “conviction in making hard, long-term decisions”. read more

Shell boss denies job fears

Screen Shot 2013-02-21 at 00.34.52

Nick Sas, The West Australian February 21, 2013

Screen Shot 2013-02-21 at 00.37.57Royal Dutch Shell Australia chief Ann Pickard has moved to dispel fears over the lack of local jobs on its new floating LNG hubs, saying the “more important” maintenance and service jobs will stay local and last for up to 30 years.

Speaking on the sidelines of the Australian Oil and Gas conference in Perth yesterday, Ms Pickard dismissed the concentrated union campaign against FLNG, saying claims such as the use of Filipino workers for FLNG were incorrect.

Unions have attacked the Government and Shell over recent weeks, saying WA workers will miss out on construction jobs, with work moved to overseas shipbuilding yards. read more

Shell says no need to rush Australia Gorgon LNG expansion

Screen Shot 2013-01-10 at 21.55.29

PERTH | Wed Feb 20, 2013 5:01am EST

Feb 20 (Reuters) – There is no need to rush the expansion of the $52-billion Gorgon liquefied natural gas (LNG) complex, the chairman of Shell Australia said on Wednesday, adding that the company wanted to avoid distraction while it kept the project on track.

Shell holds a stake of 25 percent in the Gorgon development, located off the coast of northwest Australia and spearheaded by Chevron. Now 55 percent complete, it will be Australia’s largest, with an output of 15.6 million tonnes per annum (mtpa). read more

Shell head dismisses floating LNG concerns

The head of Shell in Australia, Ann Pickard, has dismissed claims that floating liquefied natural gas technology is environmentally unsafe.

By Kathryn Diss

The head of Shell in Australia, Ann Pickard, has dismissed claims that floating liquefied natural gas technology is environmentally unsafe.

The WA Premier Colin Barnett has expressed concerns about using floating technology to process LNG from the Browse project, north of Broome.

He says he does not think the technology is safe and has warned of a major oil and gas spill if it is used.

He remains committed to processing the gas onshore at James Price Point.

Shell is a partner in the joint venture and is currently developing a floating LNG platform for its Prelude project offshore from Broome. read more

Royal Dutch Shell flags Australian cost pressure

By Ross Kelly

SYDNEY–A senior Royal Dutch Shell PLC RDS.B -0.08% executive said Wednesday the cost of building energy projects in Australia is becoming “very worrisome” as the European oil giant prepares to decide whether it will spend billions more dollars in the resource-rich nation.

Shell has already committed almost US$30 billion to Australian gas-export projects being built over the next five years. The company’s Australian head, Ann Pickard, said the figure is poised to become US$50 billion if final decisions are made on other projects that Shell has on the drawing board. read more

Royal Dutch Shell interfering with politics

From pages 41, 42, 43 & 44 of “Royal Dutch Shell and its sustainability troubles” – Background report to the Erratum of Shell’s Annual Report 2010

The report is made on behalf of Milieudefensie (Friends of the Earth Netherlands)
Author: Albert ten Kate: May 2011.

Interfering with politics

Improper involvement?

Oil and politics have a lot to do with each other. The home states of Royal Dutch Shell are the United Kingdom and the Netherlands. These countries might want to secure their oil/gas imports and the economic benefits of having an international oil company based within their territory. These interests might overpower ethical interests, such as the protection of human rights in countries hosting the oil company. Home states often might have the same business interest than “their” oil companies. read more

Shell sponsored conflict and corruption in Nigeria

From pages 12, 13, 14 & 15 of “Royal Dutch Shell and its sustainability troubles” – Background report to the Erratum of Shell’s Annual Report 2010

The report is made on behalf of Milieudefensie (Friends of the Earth Netherlands)
Author: Albert ten Kate: May 2011.

SHELL IN NIGERIA

Shell assesses its contribution to conflict

With regard to conflict in the Niger Delta, Shell often profiles itself as one of the main victims. In July 2009, the company wrote: “We hope people recognise that the employees and contractor staff of [SPDC]…have to carry out their work against a backdrop of crime, violence, threats of kidnap and community actions.” Indeed, the Niger Delta is an extremely difficult environment for any company to operate.

However, one could also assess how Shell’s activities might contribute to conflict. In 2002 and 2003, Shell commissioned such research. The resulting report, released in December 2003, was written by three external conflict resolution experts. The insights in the report drew “heavily on the experiences of more than 200 individuals consulted during its preparation.” Shell had declined to publish the independent report, but it was leaked in June 2004. The report states that “after operating in the Niger Delta for over 50 years, SCIN [Shell company in Nigeria] is an integral part of the regional conflict environment (….) and the manner in which the SCIN operates and its staff behave creates, feeds into, or exacerbates conflict.” read more

Shell Says Australia Must Move on Climate With ‘Clock Ticking’

By James Paton – Jun 15, 2011 10:30 AM GMT+0100

Australia should introduce a cap- and-trade system to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions and act “earlier rather than later” to tackle climate change, Royal Dutch Shell Plc (RDSA) said.

“The clock is ticking,” Ann Pickard, chairman of Shell’s operations in Australia, said today in a speech in Sydney, according to an e-mailed copy of her presentation. “I do think that it’s in our interest for Australia to be an example to the rest of the world.” read more

Royal Dutch Shell improper meddling in politics

From pages 41 & 42 of “Royal Dutch Shell and its sustainability troubles” – Background report to the Erratum of Shell’s Annual Report 2010

The report is made on behalf of Milieudefensie (Friends of the Earth Netherlands)
Author: Albert ten Kate: May 2011.

Interfering with politics

Improper involvement?

Oil and politics have a lot to do with each other. The home states of Royal Dutch Shell are the United Kingdom and the Netherlands. These countries might want to secure their oil/gas imports and the economic benefits of having an international oil company based within their territory. These interests might overpower ethical interests, such as the protection of human rights in countries hosting the oil company. Home states often might have the same business interest than “their” oil companies.

Oil companies may lobby their home states, so these will pay more attention to oil business possibilities. Oil companies may speak kindly of regimes that are in fact abusing human rights. Oil companies might keep their finger on the pulses of home as well as host states, in order to keep informed of the latest political developments. read more

WikiLeaks exposes Shell’s infiltration of Nigeria’s government

The recent WikiLeaks revelations have exposed the high level of influence, infiltration and intelligence-gathering that global oil companies have in resource-rich nations in Africa, specifically Shell’s role in Nigeria. Shell gained information on all aspects of Nigeria’s oil business.

Leaked US diplomatic cables from last year, carried by a number of international newspapers and magazines, show that Royal Dutch Shell – among the major oil producers in Nigeria – have infiltrated key Nigerian ministries and have been using links to US officials to gain information on rival oil companies in the country, and the movements and objectives of militants in the Niger Delta region.

Shell’s level of penetration into the governmental structure of Nigeria – one of the world’s largest oil exporters – have given the company access to politicians and decision-makers at the highest level, providing it with insider knowledge of all movements and negotiations within those ministries. read more

Shell ‘co-opting’ Nigerian militants

By John Donovan

In June 2009 we reported that a Shell Nigeria insider had disclosed to us that senior colleagues had a commercial relationship with militant leaders of gangs carrying out attacks on Shell employees, pipelines and installations. We established that the source was authentic. Indeed, to our surprise we discovered that The Financial Times had already confirmed the basics of our source’s allegations (see “Shell gives Nigerian work to Militant companies”).

There were two possible interpretations. read more

Shell to face hearings on Nigeria work

Published: Jan. 6, 2011 at 5:25 PM

AMSTERDAM, Netherlands, Jan. 6 (UPI) — Officials with Royal Dutch Shell said they were invited before the Dutch Parliament to discuss ongoing concerns about activity in the oil-rich Niger Delta.

Royal Dutch Shell is under fire for its operations in Nigeria as oil rebels ramp up activity following the collapse of a November cease-fire. The Dutch Parliament invited Shell in for what was described as a “fact-finding session” to address Shell’s work in Nigeria, London’s Telegraph newspaper reports. read more

Shell to be grilled over Nigerian oil tensions

Royal Dutch Shell will be questioned by politicians over its operations in Nigeria – two months after tensions over oil exploration in the region flared up again.

Members of the militant Movement for the Emancipation of the Niger Delta (MEND) on patrol. Photo: EPA   By Rowena Mason 6:30AM GMT 05 Jan 2011

Dutch lawmakers have arranged a hearing, described as a “fact-finding session”, after several MPs travelled to the troubled Niger Delta region.

A ceasefire between militants opposed to foreign oil exploration and the government broke down in November.

Pipeline bombings caused output to fall 40pc in Africa’s top oil producer until a ceasefire in July 2009. However, this collapsed when 13 hostages were taken from Afren and ExxonMobil’s oil installations this autumn.

Nigeria’s army, navy and air force launched a large offensive six weeks ago, storming rebel camps and jailing insurgents. read more

Shell to Face Nigeria Grilling

JANUARY 4, 2011

Dutch Parliament Hearing Expected to Touch on Corruption in Oil-Rich Delta, as Spills Spur Concerns

Agence France-Presse/Getty Images

November protests marked the 15th anniversary of Nigeria’s then-military regime’s execution of activists who challenged degradation of Ogoni land in the Niger Delta.

By GUY CHAZAN

Royal Dutch Shell PLC will this month be grilled by Dutch lawmakers for the first time over its operations in the Niger Delta, reflecting growing concern in the West about oil spills in west Africa.

Critics of Shell’s record, both in parliament and among non-governmental organizations, are expected to use parliamentary hearings, scheduled for Jan. 26, to quiz the company over its activities in Nigeria. The country’s oil sector has long been plagued by militant violence, corruption, organized crime and, by extension, environmental damage. read more

%d bloggers like this: