Royal Dutch Shell Plc  .com Rotating Header Image

Posts Tagged ‘Piper Alpha disaster’

On a wing and a prayer


Shell Brent Bravo disaster: “
The installation manager and supervisors were working under a regime where production had to be maintained at all costs. Safety was a secondary issue almost totally ignored by the Managers in Aberdeen.”

John

You may wish to publish this as a follow up and contribution to recent inputs on your blog site.  It is also certainly in the NASA and Shell examples a spectacular illustration of how ineffective at such times the so called governance process was included the much heralded concept amongst a management team of shared collective responsibility.

Article By Retired Shell International HSE Group Auditor Bill Campbell: “Forget about the consequence, it won’t happen, will it?”

Piper Alpha on fire shortly after the second explosion

Dutchdude on September 2nd spoke about the acceptance of risk being a trend amongst staff who have not witnessed serious events themselves, and therefore assume it won’t happen. I am sure he has a point, as they say, you don’t know what you don’t know. So inexperience is a factor. read more

INFORMATION SUPPLIED TO SHELL AND THE SCOTTISH POLICE

Screen Shot 2013-09-27 at 15.59.45ROYAL DUTCH SHELL PLC (COMPANY SEC MICHIEL BRANDJES) AND THE SCOTTISH POLICE (CHIEF SUPT. BILLY GORDON) HAVE HAD ADVANCE SIGHT OF THIS EMAIL AND ATTACHED INFORMATION FROM BILL CAMPBELL, RETIRED HSE GROUP AUDITOR, SHELL INTERNATIONAL

From: Cambell
Subject: Articles
Date: 25 September 2013 12:33:02 GMT+01:00
To: [email protected]
Cc: [email protected], [email protected]

John
 
I want to keep up the pressure on Shell by the publication of these two additional articles that cover the hardware faults taken from Shell’s own data.
 
The Chairman wrote to me some time ago saying he agreed with the 2006 press releases, I understand his defence now is that he was misled at the time by Malcolm Brinded and his legal counsel Keith Ruddock.
 
I want to use the fact that the Chairman has not raised, and will not raise, any legal objection to these articles in this correspondence copied to the police, and the previous article re behaviours, in future correspondence with the HSE and the judiciary.
 
I will pass to all the bundles of evidence supporting these articles in due course
 
Bill read more

Piper Alpha: Fire In The Night

Screen Shot 2013-07-06 at 13.57.15On the 25th anniversary of one of the world’s worst offshore oil disasters, this documentary chronicles the tragic events that occurred on the Piper Alpha rig on the 6th of July 1988. It was a cataclysm that killed 167 men and left only 61 survivors, each of whom had to fight for their lives to escape the huge, labyrinthine structure and the flames that were consuming it.

For those that have not seen this documentary, on July 9th at 9pm UK time (2200 NL time) BBC2 is broadcasting this documentary again. read more

Retired Shell Global Chief Petroleum Engineer Iain Percival speaks out

I am reacting to the article on BP’s difficulties in court in the litigious US environment. BP has a case to answer; no-one disputes that. However the feeding frenzy is a disgrace and another demonstration of “one rule in the US and another for the rest of the world.” The sums being talked about as “justified compensation” for the deaths, environmental damage, loss of earnings beggar belief and could eventually destroy the company.

Comment by Retired Shell Global Chief Petroleum Engineer Iain Percival on the Bloomberg/Businessweek article:

How BP Got Screwed on Gulf Oil Spill Claims

1 July 2013

I am reacting to the article on BP’s difficulties in court in the litigious US environment. BP has a case to answer; no-one disputes that. However the feeding frenzy is a disgrace and another demonstration of “one rule in the US and another for the rest of the world.”

In a few days (July 6th) our business will mark the 25th anniversary of the Piper Alpha disaster in the North Sea. It is worth while remembering that the operating deficiencies of Occidental, a US oil company, resulted in the deaths of 167 men. In addition, the survivors have been scarred (physically and mentally) for life and the families have done their collective best to get on with their lives without resorting to armies of lawyers. In contrast, 11 men died in the Deep Water Horizon episode. That is certainly 11 too many but not the same scale of human disaster as was Piper Alpha. The sums being talked about as “justified compensation” for the deaths, environmental damage, loss of earnings beggar belief and could eventually destroy the company. In addition, a number of BP employees could end up with lengthy custodial prison sentences. In contrast the “damage” suffered by Occidental was derisory being £110 million paid to the survivors (considerably less than £1 million per man) and not a single Occidental employee or company official was prosecuted in a court of law. To add insult to injury. Occidental’s lawyers spent considerable time and effort following the payments trying to recover the money from contractors on Piper Alpha, pursuant to indemnity obligations in contracts, which were common in the North Sea at the time of the disaster.
read more

Piper Alpha: Aberdeen offshore conference teaching disaster lessons

Screen Shot 2012-12-07 at 16.17.08

Screen Shot 2013-06-18 at 14.20.23

A three-day conference to encourage people working offshore to think about the lessons of the Piper Alpha disaster is being held in Aberdeen.

A total of 167 men died in the tragedy on 6 July 1988 when explosions and a fireball ripped through the rig.

(Related article: Shell’s North Sea history of safety violations, blackmail and blacklisting)

About 750 delegates will take part in ‘Piper 25’ at the Aberdeen Exhibition and Conference Centre (AECC).

The keynote speaker is Lord Cullen, whose report into the tragedy led to major safety changes. read more

BG Group corporate incubator for Shell strays?

“Nowhere in the flattering and in my judgement misleading CV for Finlayson is there any mention of the words safety, health or environment. It eulogises Finlayson for his optimising of production and operating performance, well that is what TFA was all about.”: “Anyway for fair reason or foul, Finlayson arrives, Carne leaves, Finlayson reaches the Board, Berget maybe gets his marching orders. Maybe all pals together they were keeping BG seats warm for the next Shell bum or maybe there was more to it as suggested, anyway it shows BG Advance as an entity acting as a corporate incubator for Shell strays?”

By Bill Campbell, retired HSE Group Auditor, Shell International

Post Piper Alpha it was readily apparent to Lord Cullen that the legislation pertaining to offshore oil and gas extraction was weak with regards to pinning down responsibility and accountability. At that time the statutory instrument SI 1019 made the Offshore Installation Manager (OIM) specifically responsible for what happened offshore re health and safety.

SI 1019 essentially made the OIM Captain of the ship and Occidental Directors appeared on paper at least to be twice removed from how these issues were handled offshore on their installations. read more

Shell’s North Sea history of safety violations, blackmail and blacklisting

Paying For The PiperBy John Donovan

Violation of this court order, Shell warned, could result in the families and survivors concerned being ‘subject to bodily imprisonment: Faced with such legal harassment, even case-hardened lawyers involved in the proceedings reeled in disbelief

A book first published in 1996, “PAYING FOR THE PIPER”, provides more evidence of the dark side of Royal Dutch Shell, which also reflects on its current Chief Ethics & Compliance Officer: Mr. Richard Wiseman.

The book reported on the industrial relations crisis which erupted after the world’s worst offshore disaster in which 167 oil workers died on 6 July 1988 in an explosion and fire on the Piper Alpha North Sea oil production platform, operated by Occidental Petroleum. read more

%d bloggers like this: