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All guns blazing from company that alleged Shell Corruption of Irish Police

“Let us clearly state Officers Gilligan, Gill Butler and Grimes offloaded alcohol exactly as described by OSSL, and as clearly understood by Michael Crothers CEO of Shell when he offered to pay for it in The Burlington Hotel in Dublin in the presence of legal people for both Shell /OSSL.”

By John Donovan

If you make a serious accusation against a public servant and that individual is subsequently cleared by an official investigation, it becomes an even more serious libel if the same unfounded accusation is repeated.

This upping of the defamation stakes is multiplied in the case of Irish police officers accused by OSSL of handling alcohol purchased by OSSL on behalf of Shell, as they have been effectively cleared of the allegations in FIVE separate investigations. Two by the Garda, two by Shell and the most recent by the Garda Ombudsman Commission (GSOC).

Despite this history, OSSL has today repeated and circulated the same allegations, naming specific Irish police officers as being involved in the corruption scandal surrounding the policing of the controversial Corrib Gas Project in Ireland. 

Extract from an OSSL email circulated today:

Let us clearly state Officers Gilligan, Gill Butler and Grimes offloaded alcohol exactly as described by OSSL, and as clearly understood by Michael Crothers CEO of Shell when he offered to pay for it in The Burlington Hotel in Dublin in the presence of legal people for both Shell /OSSL. 

The senior investigator of the GSOC, Johan Gronewald, has said that the matter is now closed and refuses to disclose the content of the completed report on the basis that it is a privileged document. I would have thought that in the public interest and for the sake of transparency, the report should be made public in its entirety, bearing in mind the astonishing claim that there was no evidence, when evidence was provided, including an invoice from OSSL to Shell for a large consignment of alcohol.

If the invoice is fake, and there was no alcohol, then surely charges should be brought against OSSL for creating a fake invoice and demanding money from Shell based on a fake invoice for goods that never existed? 

Many people in Ireland are likely to be puzzled if the named police officers allow this situation to continue by failing to issue defamation proceedings against OSSL, and against me, for continuing to publicise the allegations. 

Would you not defend your name if falsely accused of being involved in corruption?

Why is it that these Irish police officers are prepared to meekly accept being libelled, rather than give evidence under oath in the witness box and being subjected to cross-examination?

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