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Shell’s “Green” Exit from China: Profit Over Planet

Posted by John Donovan: 2 May 2024

In a move that truly exemplifies their commitment to saving the planet, Shell has decided to bid farewell to their power generation business in China. But fear not, fellow Earthlings, for they’re not completely abandoning their efforts to combat climate change – they’re just prioritising profits over, well, everything else.

Shell’s CEO wants you to know that reducing global oil and gas production would be “dangerous and irresponsible.” Because obviously, what the world really needs right now is more hydrocarbons. It’s not like we’re facing a climate crisis or anything.

Closing divisions that generate green power and trade in low-carbon electricity, Shell bids adieu to nearly 2,000 employees across China, proving once again that when it comes to corporate responsibility, they’re the epitome of… something.

But hey, don’t let the door hit you on the way out of China, Shell. They’re keeping their electric vehicle charging operation open because, you know, electric cars are the future. Or maybe they just realized there’s money to be made there. Who can tell?

In a statement to Reuters, Shell reassured us that they’re selectively investing in power, which apparently means ditching anything that doesn’t line their pockets with gold. Ah, the sacrifices corporations make for the greater good.

And don’t worry, folks, they’re still committed to being a net-zero energy business by 2050. Sure, they’ve eased their carbon intensity target for 2030, but that’s just because they’re focusing on selling more power to commercial customers and less to those pesky retail ones. Because who cares about individual consumers, right?

Shell’s CEO wants you to know that reducing global oil and gas production would be “dangerous and irresponsible.” Because obviously, what the world really needs right now is more hydrocarbons. It’s not like we’re facing a climate crisis or anything.

But wait, there’s more! Shell’s not alone in their exodus from China. Apparently, it’s the trendy thing to do among Western companies. Something about trade wars, intellectual property theft, and oh, let’s not forget the whole Uyghur slave labor situation. But hey, as long as it’s profitable, right?

So, as Shell pats itself on the back for focusing on “higher margin core oil and gas business,” let’s raise a glass to their unwavering commitment to profit – I mean, progress. Because when it comes to saving the planet, who needs principles when you’ve got shareholders to please?

And just in case you were worried, Shell wants you to know that their commitment to operationalizing their “powering progress strategy” in China remains unchanged. Because nothing says progress like abandoning green energy initiatives and cozying up to oil and gas, am I right?

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